Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

Time of distribution of the antídoron


  • Please log in to reply
7 replies to this topic

#1 Dimitris

Dimitris

    Regular Poster

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 176 posts
  • Orthodox Christian Member

Posted 25 September 2006 - 08:38 PM

Good evening!

This is my first post here, so I want to say hallo to everybody. Since English is not my mother tongue I would like to apologize both for possible mistakes in language and for my ignorance in Orthodox faith. I was baptized as Orthodox, but I still have to learn much.

I would like to ask about the practices of the distribution of the antídoron. I visited churches of Russian, Bulgarian, Antiochian, Romanian, Serbian and Ecumenical Patriarchate. In all these churches I observed that the antídoron is distributed to all people (both those who took communion and those who did not) after the liturgy, received by the priest whose hand is being kissed. In Church of Greek I observed, that those who take communion immediatelly after communion receive the antídoron by taking it out of a dish, thus not having to kiss the hand of the priest. But after the liturgy they again received the antídoron by the kissed hand of the priest.

How are these practices to be interpreted? I thought that in the opinion of the Church of Greece one should not kiss anything (not even the hand of the priest or icons) for a certain time after having received the communion. But then it would make no sense to receive the antídoron a second time by kissing the hand of the priest. Do I maybe misinterprete the practices or did I misobserve them (which I do not rule out)? Does the pratices really vary from archbishopric to archbishopric or is it the individual decision of the priest or metropolitan?

Kind regards,
Dimitris

#2 Olga

Olga

    Moderator

  • Moderators
  • 2,825 posts
  • Orthodox Christian Member

Posted 26 September 2006 - 04:07 AM

Hello Dimitris

I have had experience in attending both Greek and Russian churches, and in both, the taking of antidoron is the same. Those who have received communion take antidoron from a tray or basket immediately after communion, and then at the end of the liturgy as you described, along with the rest of the congregation.

As for the "no kissing after communion", this seems to be a purely Greek "pious custom", which also "forbids" spitting, bleeding or weeping for the rest of the day. Why this prohibition on the release of these bodily fluids is not clear to me, other than being told "this is how it is", without any further explanation.

On the other hand, it is common practice in Slavic churches for the communicants to kiss the base of the chalice after receiving communion, then receive the antidoron, and be given a mouthful of warm water mixed with wine to drink, to "wash down the communion". I have never seen communicants avoid venerating icons or to kiss the priest's hand at the end of the liturgy, either.

#3 Antonios

Antonios

    Very Frequent Poster

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,039 posts
  • Orthodox Christian Member

Posted 26 September 2006 - 04:21 AM

Dear Dimitris and Olga,

I also have experienced it where the recipient takes antidoron immediatley after partaking of the Holy Gifts and then at the then of the liturgy from the hand of the priest. In my understanding, the taking of antidoron directly after communion is to 'wash down' the Gifts. The taking of the antidoron again at the end of the liturgy is not necessary, howere many still do out of habit, custom, etc. The kissing of the chalice is also common, though many dissuade such practices out of fear of tipping the chalice over.

#4 Irene

Irene

    Frequent Poster

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 259 posts
  • Guest from Another Religious Tradition

Posted 26 September 2006 - 05:47 AM

I have had experience in attending both Greek and Russian churches, and in both, the taking of antidoron is the same. Those who have received communion take antidoron from a tray or basket immediately after communion, and then at the end of the liturgy as you described, along with the rest of the congregation.

As for the "no kissing after communion", this seems to be a purely Greek "pious custom", which also "forbids" spitting, bleeding or weeping for the rest of the day. Why this prohibition on the release of these bodily fluids is not clear to me, other than being told "this is how it is", without any further explanation.

On the other hand, it is common practice in Slavic churches for the communicants to kiss the base of the chalice after receiving communion, then receive the antidoron, and be given a mouthful of warm water mixed with wine to drink, to "wash down the communion". I have never seen communicants avoid venerating icons or to kiss the priest's hand at the end of the liturgy, either.


I also have experienced it where the recipient takes antidoron immediatley after partaking of the Holy Gifts and then at the then of the liturgy from the hand of the priest. In my understanding, the taking of antidoron directly after communion is to 'wash down' the Gifts. The taking of the antidoron again at the end of the liturgy is not necessary, howere many still do out of habit, custom, etc. The kissing of the chalice is also common, though many dissuade such practices out of fear of tipping the chalice over.


I have been told by pious Russians at my Church that you shouldn't even clean your teeth for 24 hours, if you accidently cut yourself and bleed you should gather up the bandages and burn them and you should never kiss anything. When they kiss, they turn their heads a little so that they don't really kiss, it ends up being more of a hug with cheeks touching.

So many things end up being customs and not Church law that it becomes a little confusing, for instance I was told while helping out cooking at a Church function never to use a knife on St John the Baptist's feast days, and I was told while in the Kitchen at the Nun's monastery never to throw bread in the bin because "Jesus said unto them, "I am the bread"". When I mention these customs, most people have never heard of them.

In Christ
irene

#5 Kris

Kris

    Very Frequent Poster

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 383 posts

Posted 26 September 2006 - 11:01 AM

Hi,

Strictly speaking (although very few follow this) the antidoron given out at the end of the Liturgy should not be taken by those who already received blessed-bread after partaking of the Holy Mysteries. The meaning of the word "antidoron" (instead of the gifts) is itself an indication of this.

Kissing things (except the Chalice) should be avoided after communing in order to not spill any of the Gifts that might remain in your mouth. That being said, you do wipe your mouth with the cloth immediately after communing, and so its unlikely that kissing icons or the priest's hand would be a problem.

As for the "no kissing after communion", this seems to be a purely Greek "pious custom", which also "forbids" spitting, bleeding or weeping for the rest of the day. Why this prohibition on the release of these bodily fluids is not clear to me, other than being told "this is how it is", without any further explanation.


This is not merely a "pious custom", but a precaution taken to ensure that one does not spill any of the Body and Blood of Christ that might remain in your mouth after having partaken of the Holy Mysteries (I have not heard about not weeping though).

Nor is it a purely Greek custom. It is something observed universally among the Orthodox (atleast among the Slavs, who make up the bulk). I know that the same prohibitions for spitting, etc. are also observed by Coptic Christians.

Of course, this does not mean that the majority of the faithful observe, or even know about these rules.

In XC,
Kris

#6 Dimitris

Dimitris

    Regular Poster

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 176 posts
  • Orthodox Christian Member

Posted 29 September 2006 - 09:20 PM

In my understanding, the taking of antidoron directly after communion is to 'wash down' the Gifts.

This interpretation makes sense to me. Thank you all for your replies.

Dimitris

#7 Scott Pierson

Scott Pierson

    Very Frequent Poster

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 370 posts

Posted 02 November 2006 - 12:20 PM

In my understanding, the taking of antidoron directly after communion is to 'wash down' the Gifts.


My priest told me that it was instituted to prevent people from hiding the Eucharist in their mouth and taking it out of the Church with them to sell or give to people who were doing penance , the sick, sorcerers, etc.

You wash it down so that there is proof it is down.

#8 Tanya Hoadley

Tanya Hoadley

    Regular Poster

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 60 posts

Posted 03 November 2006 - 06:56 PM

Greetings,

I can't recall where I learned this, but I seem to recall that taking the antidoron and some warm wine mixed with water after communion was a type of agape meal, the first after the communion fast.

I think that all of the customs have the same goal; to ensure that the Body and Blood of Christ is handled and consumed with the utmost care of these precious gifts. I believe that any local custom that ensures this is truly Orthodox.

In Christ,
Tanya




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users