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Orthodox Study Bible - Complete edition


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#101 Effie Ganatsios

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Posted 23 July 2008 - 08:11 AM

steeper roads

Andreas, I live on top of a hill and a doctor, years ago, said that the only thing I needed to do to stay in good health was walk down to the town centre each day and then walk up my hill to my house.

Right! I would like to see him do this.......

This hill is definitely getting steeper each year.

I have a card that says on the cover...... after fifty, our bodies change in many ways...... Open the card and it says..... Thank God, our eyes also change............

The above quote is from memory.... which, by the way, is also going downhill.... on a really steep hill.....

#102 Olga

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Posted 23 July 2008 - 09:18 AM

Middle age is when everything hurts. And what doesn't hurt doesn't work. :))

#103 Rdr Andreas

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Posted 23 July 2008 - 11:18 AM

We know there is red martyrdom and white martrdom, and the Celtic Church had green martyrdom. I propose there should be a grey martyrdom. This is for those who patiently and even with thanks endure the infirmities of middle and old age. Especially relevant in our times when (in western countries) our life expectancy is so much greater than in former times. I want a crown for cheerfully accepting that they print things smaller and makes hills steeper these days, and things hurt or don't work.

#104 Effie Ganatsios

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Posted 25 July 2008 - 08:48 AM

I want a crown for being polite when 30 year old men call me "auntie" - a form of polite address to elderly ladies. I should say middle aged ladies.

I am particularly irritated when handsome 30 year olds call me this.................................

Effie

Edited by Effie Ganatsios, 25 July 2008 - 08:50 AM.
thought it absolutely necessary to add "middle aged ladies"


#105 Alice

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Posted 25 July 2008 - 10:23 AM

I want a crown for being polite when 30 year old men call me "auntie" - a form of polite address to elderly ladies. I should say middle aged ladies.

I am particularly irritated when handsome 30 year olds call me this.................................

Effie


It is a funny thing in Greece--I find it nice and respectful that young people call me 'Kyria Aliki' and infact, it is much nicer than in the U.S. where everyone is on purely first name basis (no matter what the age difference), but on the other hand...it makes one terribly aware of their 'middle age'!!! :-(

Regards,
Alice

#106 Rdr Andreas

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Posted 25 July 2008 - 01:36 PM

So far as I can tell, the Russian use of the patronymic isn't quite so age-related and does preserve the formality which we abandoned in England. Thus, for example, I address a similar-aged person I know at church as 'Alexander Andreyevich'. It seems nice to me.

#107 Olga

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Posted 25 July 2008 - 10:30 PM

So far as I can tell, the Russian use of the patronymic isn't quite so age-related and does preserve the formality which we abandoned in England. Thus, for example, I address a similar-aged person I know at church as 'Alexander Andreyevich'. It seems nice to me.


There is no equivalent title of Mr or Mrs in the Russian tradition. Everyone, irrespective of age difference, can be properly referred to by their first name and patronymic. Though children may, as they do in Greek custom, call an older person uncle/aunty and their first name.

#108 Paul Cowan

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Posted 26 July 2008 - 12:52 AM

I want a crown for being polite when 30 year old men call me "auntie" - a form of polite address to elderly ladies. I should say middle aged ladies.

I am particularly irritated when handsome 30 year olds call me this.................................

Effie


Miss Effie,

When I deal with "older" women to show them respect whether they are married or not, I call them Miss (name). It suits all needs and occassions, especially down here in the south.

I feel I can not make you irritated since I am not handsome nor 30.

#109 Effie Ganatsios

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Posted 26 July 2008 - 04:21 AM

That sounds good, Paul!

The picture in my head (probably from films I watched in the past). A delicate little old lady, dressed in pastel, filmy, lacy dresses. Probably wearing a pearl necklace she inherited from her grandmother. Lavendar scent wafting in the air around her. Well bred and with a sweet voice.

Delicately sipping a mint julep in the afternoon on her verandah.

Or gulping half a dozen when fed up with her image.




Effie

p.s. Paul have you read A Municipal Report by O Henry?
One of my favourites.






Yes, yes, definitely me

#110 Olga

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Posted 26 July 2008 - 07:48 AM

Effie, you may be inspired by this little poem:

WARNING (by Jenny Joseph)

When I am an old woman I shall wear purple
With a red hat which doesn't go, and doesn't suit me.
And I shall spend my pension on brandy and summer gloves
And satin sandals, and say we've no money for butter.
I shall sit down on the pavement when I'm tired
And gobble up samples in shops and press alarm bells
And run my stick along the public railings
And make up for the sobriety of my youth.
I shall go out in my slippers in the rain
And pick the flowers in other people's gardens
And learn to spit.

You can wear terrible shirts and grow more fat
And eat three pounds of sausages at a go
Or only bread and pickle for a week
And hoard pens and pencils and beermats and things in boxes.

But now we must have clothes that keep us dry
And pay our rent and not swear in the street
And set a good example for the children.
We must have friends to dinner and read the papers.

But maybe I ought to practice a little now?
So people who know me are not too shocked and surprised
When suddenly I am old, and start to wear purple.

#111 Effie Ganatsios

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Posted 26 July 2008 - 04:11 PM

Olga, I liked your poem.

And there is a lot of truth in it. The older you get the more comfortable you feel, the more you rely on your own judgement and don't really care that much about what other people think. As long as you are OK with your conscience.


The strangest thing is that you become "invisible". I don't know if this is good or bad, but it is very comforting. I love being invisible.

Effie

#112 Tian Mee Boyaci

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Posted 01 May 2012 - 03:20 AM

Christ is Risen!! Father, did anyone reply to your Q on Proverbs 22:6 missing from Orthodox Study Bible Thank you. Ariadne

#113 Bruce Geerdes

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Posted 04 January 2013 - 04:44 PM

Apologies for highjacking this thread about aging and poetry but I thought some might be interested to hear that there is now an Orthodox Study Bible app for the iPhone & iPod touch.

http://vdub.us/osb-as

Hope to have an iPad version soon (in the next few months).




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