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Lenten recipes

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#221 Nina

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Posted 23 March 2009 - 12:43 AM

Easy, tasty and healthy snack: take a ripe avocado. Split down the middle. Split down the middle. Remove pit...sprinkle salt and pepper and eat by scooping out with a spoon!


I also add a bit of lemon juice to an avocado.

Sometime my husband adds a bit of ketchup on the avocado also for more taste.

#222 Paul Cowan

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Posted 23 March 2009 - 05:01 AM

I've never been one for tofu, but I thought I would give it a serious try this season.

I still don't much care for it.

1 block soft tofu, pureed
1 pkg onion dip mix
corn chips
refrigerate

There you go Fr. 3 ingredients

Now to make it palatable; add salt, white pepper, lemon juice and another pkt of dip mix. Have large glass of water nearby. You're gonna need it.

#223 Alice

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Posted 23 March 2009 - 12:06 PM

I've never been one for tofu, but I thought I would give it a serious try this season.

I still don't much care for it.

1 block soft tofu, pureed
1 pkg onion dip mix
corn chips
refrigerate

There you go Fr. 3 ingredients

Now to make it palatable; add salt, white pepper, lemon juice and another pkt of dip mix. Have large glass of water nearby. You're gonna need it.


Firm tofu sliced, dredged in a little flour and fried is delicious...for an Asian flavour, add some ginger or sesame dressing, or soy or teryaki sauce to the pan at the end......add to some brown rice and it makes for a satisfying and tasty meal, and cooked like this, one will change their mind about tofu!

Speaking of changing the mind about tofu, in the U.S., in many supermarkets, a frozen dessert product called 'Tofutti' exists. There are also Tofutti 'ice cream sandwiches', which I have tried, and are even better than the real ice cream ones....

Another ready made supermarket product which is satisfying during the fast is the Slavic food 'pierogies'...I have bought the potato and cabbage filled ones, sauteed them in oil with some onions, and they really are 'stick to the ribs' type satisfying...men who like filling foods will especially like them.

Many gourmet take out stores sell ratatouille. Buy some and mix it with pasta or eat with crusty bread.
Also, french lentil salads are popular at gourmet take out stores. These are also tasty and Lenten....

The beauty of fasting in the U.S. vs. Greece, is that the availability of so many really good quality different vegan foods (Asian, Indian, etc.) without having to cook too much, is great, and therefore, it is extremely convenient and easy to fast with little trouble or too much boredom.

I once bought some ready made 'vegan' food ( I believe imported from Germany) in Greece, and almost got sick, it was so disgusting....Ladera (oily/fasting vegan) foods are very good and delicious in Greece, but the variety becomes a bit limited after a while, and after a few weeks, I find it can get tiring and discouraging.

Although I will give credit to McDonald's in Greece, and Goodie's fast food...McDonald's has a few 'McSarkakosti' (Sarakosti:Lent) dishes (YES, you heard correctly !!!), and I hear the Goodie's does to, including, some awesome kolokithokeftedes (fried zucchini fritters/nuggets)

Alice

Edited by Alice, 23 March 2009 - 12:46 PM.


#224 Paul Cowan

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Posted 23 March 2009 - 08:54 PM

[a frozen dessert product called 'Tofutti' exists. There are also Tofutti 'ice cream sandwiches', which I have tried, and are even better than the real ice cream ones....


You've never been to Texas have you Alice?

I will seek out this frozen tofu thingy you mention, but NOTHING beats a bowl of Blue Bell ice cream.

I recently tried store bought fried tofu cubes with black fungus that are pretty ok.

#225 Alice

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Posted 23 March 2009 - 10:44 PM

You've never been to Texas have you Alice?

I will seek out this frozen tofu thingy you mention, but NOTHING beats a bowl of Blue Bell ice cream.

I recently tried store bought fried tofu cubes with black fungus that are pretty ok.


Paul,

I do admit that I have never been to Texas (though my husband has-- if that counts!), and I also admit that your Blue Bell ice cream sounds delish, BUT--and here is the $10,000 question-- IS IT VEGAN?!?

Let's try to stay on track with the fast and with this thread....because we still have a few more weeks to go!! *wink* --(and then you can eat Blue Bell to your heart's content!) :-)

Be well,
Alice

#226 Kseniya M.

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Posted 23 March 2009 - 11:32 PM

Blue Bell ice cream.


I have a Firefox add-on called No Script that reports this link (www.bluebell.com) as a reported attack site. Possibly a hacker managed to stick something on it? Since I'm a bit goosey about going there with all the warnings I'm getting, I'd love it if you (Paul) could tell us a bit more about it (like, is it vegan?).

-Kseniya

#227 Alice

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Posted 24 March 2009 - 12:18 AM

Kseniya,

I had no problem going to the site on my computer, but the reason I was teasing Paul is because it is most definitely NOT vegan--(real dairy cream)...and that is why I told him to wait until the fast is over to think about it...

We proudly make Blue Bell Ice Cream the old fashioned, traditional way, so it tastes just like it
was hand cranked.

As you'd expect, we use the finest milk, cream, sugar and other ingredients money can buy.


Ofcourse, I would love to hear Paul's description of what exactly makes it special!..and we can all salivate reading it! *wink*

The only vegan ice cream I know of is 'Tofutti' and it is very good...

http://www.tofutti.com/ts.shtml

Alice

#228 Paul Cowan

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Posted 24 March 2009 - 12:29 AM

IS IT VEGAN?!?

Let's try to stay on track with the fast and with this thread....because we still have a few more weeks to go!! *wink* --(and then you can eat Blue Bell to your heart's content!) :-)

Be well,
Alice


Ok, you two. I admit I got ahead of myself, I just took exception to something being purported better than something from TEXAS. (It's a cultural thing)

NO it is definitely NOT vegan. Sorry about the bad site. I had to go in through a back door myself. It really is their site. Don't know who hacked it.

Their slogan is "We eat all we can and sell the rest." In their employee breakroom, they have a walk in freezer with every kind of product they sell and it is ALL free as long as you are on shift that day. No, you can't take it home for free. So they do live up to their slogan.

I'll try to stay on topic. ^;^

Edited by Paul Cowan, 24 March 2009 - 12:32 AM.
added slogan


#229 Tanya Hoadley

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Posted 24 March 2009 - 06:38 AM

Hi to all,

I couldn't help noticing that of all the threads in my unread post list, this thread has the most views... over 1200.

Hmmm or should I say Mmmm.

Anyway, here's my contribution.

Hurry up and eat before running out the door 'cause I'm gonna be late for work casserole

1) Boil water
2) Put ramen noodles in bowl
3) Add boiling water
4) Rummage in freezer and find non freezer burnt vegetables while waiting for noodles to get soft
5) Add frozen veges and as the thaw they will cool down the noodles so that you can..
6) Hurry and eat and not burn your tongue as you race out the door to work.

Tanya

#230 Fr Raphael Vereshack

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Posted 26 March 2009 - 03:37 PM

Without Chinese soups I don't know what I would end up eating during Great Lent.

You can also add frozen shrimp to these (make sure though you add these or the frozen vegetables to the water first before you put in the noodles as the noodles cook so fast) then add a few drops of real soy sauce.

In Christ- Fr Raphael

#231 Kseniya M.

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Posted 26 March 2009 - 06:54 PM

2 large carrots, peeled and chopped small
1 cup Kashi (or any whole grain)
1 clove garlic, minced
1/4 tsp thyme
1/2 tsp salt

Combine all ingredients in a 1.5 quart (small) crockpot. Add water to cover, then add 1-2 extra cups. Cook on low for 6-8 hours.

This is a lot of grain for a small crockpot, so care must be taken that the liquid doesn't evaporate off. It makes a thick and hearty stew.

#232 Effie Ganatsios

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Posted 27 March 2009 - 07:12 AM

I

2 large carrots, peeled and chopped small
1 cup Kashi (or any whole grain)
1 clove garlic, minced
1/4 tsp thyme
1/2 tsp salt

Combine all ingredients in a 1.5 quart (small) crockpot. Add water to cover, then add 1-2 extra cups. Cook on low for 6-8 hours.

This is a lot of grain for a small crockpot, so care must be taken that the liquid doesn't evaporate off. It makes a thick and hearty stew.


I do not know the above recipe but the ingredients are very nutricious. I do not know what Kashi is but I use Bulgar wheat now instead of rice in dishes that need rice. I saute it with a small chopped onion (olive oil or just plain water can be used for this) and then boil it thoroughly because it needs to be soft before being added to most dishes. I only use a small amount but it is delicious and even a small amount goes a long way.

"In English, kasha generally refers to buckwheat groats, but in Slavic countries, kasha refers to porridge in general, and can be made from any cereal, especially buckwheat, wheat, barley, oats, and rye. It is one of the oldest known dishes in the Slavic cuisines of the Eastern European cuisine, at least a thousand years old.[1][2]"

Apparently Kasha is buckwheat groats.
Bulgar is wheat groats.

We learn so much on this forum. I will ask in my favourite natural foods shop for buckwheat groats. The owner imports so many wonderful things that she is sure to have them - and if she hasn't she will get them for you. Last week I bought a bottle of pure cranberry juice from Germany. The cranberry juice in the supermarkets has had sugar added to it and is therefore forbidden. Yesterday afternoon I had a refreshing drink of a little of the above cranberry juice (it is concentrated) on a couple of ice cubes topped with a can of Souroti - mineral water (the best). Lovely..........................

3 ingredients : concentrated German cranberry juice, mineral water, and icecubes..................

The women here make a liqueur using cranberries, tsipouro (pure home made alchohol) or vodka, and sugar. Delicious and very good for the stomach, but not so good for everything else.

Effie

#233 Kseniya M.

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Posted 27 March 2009 - 01:44 PM

I do not know the above recipe but the ingredients are very nutricious. I do not know what Kashi is but I use Bulgar wheat now instead of rice in dishes that need rice.


When I refer to Kashi, I'm referring specifically to a 7-grain+sesame mix available in the US (it claims to be complete protein), but you can substitute any grain or combination of grains that will thicken a stew. I also like millet in stews (it's good to toast millet in a dry pain for 5 minutes before adding it to the stew). Barley or brown rice would work very well too.

This particular stew came out very tasty.

I've been concocting various stews based on the following formula:

a few cups of something starchy (potato, carrot, winter squash, etc)
a cup of whole grain (millet, Kashi, etc)
a clove or two of garlic, minced
some herbs (thyme, sage, rosemary, etc)
some salt
throw it all in a crockpot, cover with water, add extra water for the grain to soak up, and simmer all day

These stews have been coming out very well, with one notable exception when I went a little bit berserk with the garlic. I need to find a good garlic soup recipe... (and leave out the potato).

Serve with a nice salad or some steamed veggies on the side and you have a good meal that's strictly lenten. Even my teenager has been going back for seconds.

-Kseniya

#234 Paul Cowan

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Posted 27 March 2009 - 02:01 PM

I need to find a good garlic soup recipe... (and leave out the potato).



-Kseniya


Try this out for some ideas.

#235 Michael Stickles

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Posted 28 March 2009 - 03:35 PM

When I have to prepare something myself, my favorites are multi-ingredient recipes that someone else has put together for me to heat up :-)

Del Monte Harvest Selections Santa Fe Style Rice & Beans (does contains light vegetable oils) - pull back corner of plastic cover, nuke for however long the box says, stir, eat!

(The things my wife makes are much better, but I don't think that helps anyone else looking for simple recipes :-)

- Michael

#236 Anna Stickles

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Posted 05 February 2010 - 11:37 PM

Well here we are again, maybe we can come up with a few more interesting recipes this year. It keeps the kids from getting bored with the same old stuff (ok I'll admit it I probably get bored sooner then the kids) It would be nice to gather all the recipes together without having to sort through pages of chatter, but I guess it is fun to read.
Lenten Cornbread

2 c white flour (or whole wheat flour - this makes a denser bread)
2 c cornmeal
1 ts salt
2 TB sugar
4 ts baking powder
3/4 c applesauce
2 c soy milk
2/3 c oil
mix dry ingredients, stir in wet ingredients, bake at 400 for 25-30 min in a 9x13 pan.

sauce for vegetable mix (we like it over stir-fry veggies or a broccoli, cauliflower, carrot mix)

1/4 c peanut butter
stir into this 1/2 cup hot water
add 1/4 c soy sauce
1/4 ts ginger
1 TB brown sugar
1 ts cornstarch

pour over veggies for the last minute or so of cooking and let thicken.




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