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Lenten recipes

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#21 Father David Moser

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Posted 02 March 2007 - 09:33 PM

Roasted Peppers


Roasted Peppers are also a very tasty topping for grilled portabellos. I usually clean about 4 big portabellos at a time - just taking the stem out and washing the intact cap. Then I marinade in oil, red wine or balsamic vinegar and whatever spices sound right. Then I grill them until hot all through with a few grill marks on the top of the cap for asthetics. Put a portabello on hamburger type bun with a half a roasted red bell pepper on top and eat it just like a burger - or you could serve them on a plate as you would a chop or small steak.

Fr David Moser

#22 Nina

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Posted 02 March 2007 - 09:33 PM

Bean Soup (oil or no oil)

Boil beans in hot water in an uncovered pot for 5 minutes. Rinse and boil for another 15 minutes in a covered stock pot with 3 cups hot water. Saute onion until translucent in olive oil or for no oil add 2 tablespoons bean stock from the pot and try to saute the onion. Add garlic, tomato sauce (or fresh tomato pureed), parsley, salt. Cook for 10 minutes or until a thick sauce is formed, then pour everything into the pot. Cover tightly and cook for 2 hours over low heat, or for 30 minutes in a pressure cooker. This should produce a thick juice, covering beans by 1 1/2 inch. Add oregano the end. Serve warm adding some red wine vinegar mixed well with crushed garlic and drizzle with oil if allowed.

Some people like to add chili powder and mint. Experiment!

2 cups of dry white beans
1/2 cup chopped onion
1/2 cup olive oil
garlic
2 tablespoons tomato sauce (or 1 tomato pureed)
1 tablespoon chopped parsley
vinegar
salt, oregano

P. S This goes well with toasted bread, olives, roasted peppers, Greek salad.

#23 Nina

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Posted 02 March 2007 - 09:38 PM

Roasted Peppers are also a very tasty topping for grilled portabellos. I usually clean about 4 big portabellos at a time - just taking the stem out and washing the intact cap. Then I marinade in oil, red wine or balsamic vinegar and whatever spices sound right. Then I grill them until hot all through with a few grill marks on the top of the cap for asthetics. Put a portabello on hamburger type bun with a half a roasted red bell pepper on top and eat it just like a burger - or you could serve them on a plate as you would a chop or small steak.

Fr David Moser


Yes Father that sounds so good. I like Portabella mushrooms because they have similar taste with steak but never combined it with roasted peppers. Thank you for the idea! :)

#24 Nina

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Posted 02 March 2007 - 09:48 PM

Mix of Veggies (Oil)

2 lbs of peppers, eggplant, okra, potatoes
1/2 cup oil, divided
1 cup chopped onion
4 garlic
1 cup peeled chopped tomatoes
1 tablespoon chopped parsley
Salt
Pepper


Cut off inedible tips of vegetables. Wash and slice them into 1 inch squares. Saute everything separately in half of the oil. Sauté onion and tomatoes in the remaining oil, and season with parsley, salt, and pepper. Put everything in a stock pot with a cup of water, cover tightly, and simmer until almost all moisture has cooked away. This can be done also in the oven. Serve with tofu, salad, bread.

#25 Nina

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Posted 02 March 2007 - 10:11 PM

Leeks

Leeks 1.5 kg
oil 4-5 Tablespoons
1 diced onion
tomato paste 1 Tablespoon
vinegar 2 tablespoons
bay leaf
salt, black pepper and (ground) red pepper

Clean really well the leeks and cut diagonally in 2 inch length pieces. Saute onion and add leeks. Saute until wilted a bit. Stir carefully often (leeks should not disintegrate) . Add tomato paste, red pepper, mix carefully and add water until half covered. Add salt, black pepper, bay leaf, some red wine vinegar. Cover and cook over low heat for 30-40 min.

Serve with rice and salad.

#26 Nina

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Posted 02 March 2007 - 10:12 PM

Salad

Roasted red peppers and onions, toasted walnuts over arugula, garlic dressing,
Toss lightly and serve.

#27 Nina

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Posted 02 March 2007 - 10:21 PM

Kritharaki Soup

If you have a Greek store nearby look for Kritharaki (Rice shaped semolina) or in Italian store look for semolina orzo.

Saute onion. Add celery, carrots, potato, mushrooms. Add boiling water. Cook for some minutes and add the kritharaki or orzo. Cook as directed in the package. Add parsley at the end, salt and pepper and lemon when serving.

Also in Greece the tradition for Holy Thursday is to boil water and add tahini (sesame paste), Kritharakia, salt. Cook as long as directed and serve. No oil.

#28 Nina

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Posted 02 March 2007 - 10:25 PM

Peas

Saute onion and garlic. Add diced tomato or tomato paste. Add peas (when I do not find fresh I buy the frozen ones), water to cover them half, carrots, potato, salt. It should have some juice when ready but not as a soup. Sprinkle with dill.

#29 Karena Hryniuk

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Posted 03 March 2007 - 01:45 AM

Thank you Nina and everyone for all the ideas! We all have a few more recipes to add to our repertoires.

It seems this fasting time around, even eating in moderation I seem to be expanding around the waistline instead of shrinking. All the rice, quinoa, pasta, pita bread. These carbohydrates are starting to stick!

Size 10 approaching...

IC XC
~Karena

#30 M.C. Steenberg

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Posted 04 March 2007 - 08:18 AM

This thread has been created to house the many Lenten recipes being shared by members,

#31 Fr Raphael Vereshack

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Posted 04 March 2007 - 02:42 PM

This thread has been created to house the many Lenten recipes being shared by members,


Thanks Matthew.

Now here's a Fr Raphael secret Lenten classic recipe.

Take two slices of bread (store bought- Winnipeg rye preferably).

Put margarine on bread. (don't forget to put margarine also on the second slice).

Put peanut butter on top of margarine on bread.

Now- Carefully place the two slices of bread together.

And there you go: Lent as practiced by thousands of cullinarily challenged Orthodox especially here in the developed west.


In Christ- Fr Raphael

#32 John Charmley

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Posted 04 March 2007 - 09:49 PM

For those who like Middle Eastern food - without the meat:

1 packet of tofu (smoked or unsmoked)
1 medium sized onion (preferably red) roughly chopped
6 soft apricot slices
6 dates (stoned)
1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon (& 1/2 stick)
1/2 teaspoon cumin (ground)
cube of ginger-root, thinly sliced
up to 4 cloves of garlic, roughly sliced
pinch of salt and pepper
honey to taste
couscous with raisins

tablespoon of rapeseed oil (or granola, sunflower)

Place oil in tagine dish or casserole dish, heat gently, adding first cinnamon, then cumin, ginger and garlic: saute gently, adding onion.

As onion begins to soften, add tofu and make sure it is thoroughly mixed in with the spices and oil. When onion is soft, add boiled (and still hot) water, enough to make the tagine gravy; add apricots and salt and pepper to taste. Cover and leave to cook on low heat for about 20 minutes.

Then add dates and honey to taste, leave uncovered for 10 minutes at most. Add more water (carefully) if it begins to evaporate too much.

In the meantime, cook couscous, add raisins and cover until tagine is ready.

Serve with green beans or other green vegetable.

Enjoy!

INXC

John

#33 Paul Cowan

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Posted 04 March 2007 - 10:24 PM

Even if you are the squeemish type, you will like this. Just have someone else prepare it for you.

1- Large Octopus, cleaned and rinsed
Garlic- as much as you like

I stuff the head with cleaned garlic pods and then just dump several more pods in the pan

You can cook this with NO spices or my wife uses a "little" ground red pepper, garlic and Old Bay seasoning.
Sprinkle on top, cover and bake at 300f for 2 hours.

Now this is the fun part, eat it. It is 100% edible! It tastes almost buttery.

You can also let this cool and cut it up for salads.

Save the juice and thin it with water and thicken with corn starch for a gravy on rice or potatoes.

Mix the juice with red wine vinegar and use as a salad dressing.

Use your imagination. Cooking is an art form.

Paul

#34 Karena Hryniuk

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Posted 04 March 2007 - 10:29 PM

Here's a sandwich that I tried during last years Great Lent. You might think the ingredients don't fit so well at first glance but its very tasty and makes a great lunch (trust me)

You will need:

Whole grain bread
Hummus
A handful of cranberries
Cucumber - thinly sliced
Lettuce greens - (arugula works best here but any nice greens will do)
Freshly ground black pepper

Toast two slices of the bread, then spread hummus on both sides. Sprinkle on the cranberries and layer on the cucumbers and greens. Grind fresh black pepper on the whole lot. This sandwich is crunchy, savory and a nice bit tart with the cranberries.

Enjoy

ps. -Fr Raphael's secret Lenten recipe was todays lunch :)

ICXC
~Karena

#35 Paul Cowan

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Posted 04 March 2007 - 10:31 PM

Cut a butternut squash in half and seed

put upside down in a pan with a

whole garlic pod (cut off and expose the top) along with a whole cleaned onion.

Cover and cook until tender on 350F about 1 1/2 hours.

Let cool to the touch
In batches, scoop out squash, garlic and onion into a food processor. Add enough water (chicken broth later in the year) to keep it liquidy.

Add 1 can with juice smoked oysters. Puree all.

Transfer to pot and heat. Add Rice or Soy milk and thicken with corn starch. Season to taste with salt and white pepper.

This is also good without the shellfish, for those with alergies.

Garnish with parsley and a couple of smoked oysters per bowl. Serve with oyster crackers.

Paul

#36 Nina

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Posted 05 March 2007 - 02:16 PM

Thank you Nina and everyone for all the ideas! We all have a few more recipes to add to our repertoires.

It seems this fasting time around, even eating in moderation I seem to be expanding around the waistline instead of shrinking. All the rice, quinoa, pasta, pita bread. These carbohydrates are starting to stick!

Size 10 approaching...

IC XC
~Karena


You are welcome Karena!

About gaining weight during fasting. I have heard this a lot, but I do not have the same experience. Try to cook carbohydrates in moderation and rely more on veggies and soups. Also if you are not very fond of exercise, try prostrations. I have heard that that is the exercise of the monks. :)

#37 Fr Raphael Vereshack

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Posted 05 March 2007 - 02:42 PM

Nina wrote:


About gaining weight during fasting. I have heard this a lot, but I do not have the same experience. Try to cook carbohydrates in moderation and rely more on veggies and soups.


Actually this brings up an important question since some go through acute protein starvation as the fast goes on (actually I had one elderly parishioner completely pass out while during prostrations during the Prayer of St Ephraim last week).

Since we need calories and protein what is a good Lenten source for this?

In Christ- Fr Raphael

#38 Nina

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Posted 05 March 2007 - 03:06 PM

Actually this brings up an important question since some go through acute protein starvation as the fast goes on (actually I had one elderly parishioner completely pass out while during prostrations during the Prayer of St Ephraim last week).

Since we need calories and protein what is a good Lenten source for this?

In Christ- Fr Raphael



I have heard from a vegan, that fruits and vegetables have sufficient calories and protein. In particular legumes (beans, lentils, garbanzo etc) have much more protein than meat.

I am not a MD, or nutritionist, but maybe lack of iron is the cause of fainting, because of anemia. The elder parishioner might want to consume spinach, raisins, nettle tea (lots of iron) and take vitamins supplement. Most importantly he should consult with his spiritual father because pushing himself harder might destroy the purpose of fasting. Fathers of the Church recommend discernment because fasting harder than one's capabilities might result in severe exhaustion, or illness and ultimately cause the interruption of fasting (which is not the goal!) So, as the ancients advised "Know thyself!" and talk to your spiritual father!

#39 Karena Hryniuk

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Posted 05 March 2007 - 03:48 PM

One thing to add to the previous few posts...

Being a vegetarian I remember well when I first changed my eating habit to Veganism, it was like living in a constant world of mental cloudiness and lethargy.

The only thing that cured that grey haze was to switch to an all Raw Diet. My thoughts were clear, had plenty of energy and felt better than I had in years. Common sense would say that eating flour all day would certainly depreciate and cause lack of vitamins and minerals in the diet.

Raw Foodism is becoming more popular these days, and is perfect for Lent. So amongst the carbohydrates, to balance it out with salads and fresh fruits creates variety and should also help the fainting spells if any.

Here's some good information on Raw Foodism for those interested in incorporating into their Lenten diets.

http://www.thegardendiet.com/

In Christ
~Karena

#40 Rebecca Gabl

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Posted 05 March 2007 - 04:48 PM

I scrolled through that website...there's something creepy about feeding a baby almond milk and veggie smoothies instead of breast milk. (I know that's not what you're suggesting...) But yeah, I agree that filling up on white flour carbs is a bad idea. Ever since the fast started, my athletic performance has gone down, even though I've tried to eat a healthy diet. Oh, well. :)

I tried to go part of the first week of Lent on only raw foods, and it really did a number on my stomach...I had to branch out to oatmeal and bread. But I've always had a sensitive stomach. :(




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