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Lenten recipes

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#41 Fr Raphael Vereshack

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Posted 05 March 2007 - 06:34 PM

Maybe we go through different physical phases as we get older.

In the monastery where I began my monastic life in my 20s without fail I would feel serious protein starvation by the 6th Week of Lent. My spiritual father always gave me a blessing to eat richer foods when this happened.

Our diet at the time was usually a combination of grains & legumes. It was based on a popular book of the time- I think it was called Diet for a Small Planet which explained that many people in the Third World have a very healthy diet with little meat. Whether this was correct or not the fact is that eating this way was surprisingly sustaining & put one in a healthy state of mind.

It's interesting that as some of the posts above note, we are open in our sense of fasting to influences from what are called 'alternative life styles.' It makes sense since we have an 'alternative life-style'.

In Christ- Fr Raphael

#42 Rick H.

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Posted 05 March 2007 - 07:46 PM

Monachos Lenten Latte:

Combine in a coffee grinder: 1 part espresso bean + 1 part espresso bean + 1 part espresso bean. Hold the grinder button down until your wife and/or kids start to be annoyed just a bit. Then fill espresso maker with water and turn button to "ON" position. Add espresso to steamed soy milk, with chocolate syrup and favorite flavors (viz. caramel and vanilla for 'Milky Way" latte) and enjoy with one of your favorite monachos threads.

#43 Karena Hryniuk

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Posted 05 March 2007 - 07:53 PM

I think the point here is that to have people get so malnourished that we see them collapsing, is not only dangerous but really unneccessary. After all the reason we fast is not to starve ourselves or to suffer terribly, rather to make us conscious.

So, then, to participate in the fast but to do so in a balanced manner is something a lot more realistic and responsible.

More recipes anyone..??

IC XC
~Karena

#44 Nina

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Posted 05 March 2007 - 08:20 PM

Well... I grew up in a so called "Third World" country. Meat, dairy and eggs were in great shortage. So it was kind of continuous fasting without prompted to do so from God. I have to tell you that people make you fast for long periods of time and... no mercy, or feasting, or reaping benefits involved. :)
Thank God I feel great, and as you can see I can write... I am not different, or did not suffer any damage from that time. :)

Father and Rick thank you for your sense of humor! :)

#45 Maria Murray

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Posted 05 March 2007 - 08:35 PM

Black bean (or split pea) soup
I turn on the crock pot in the morning, fill it up with water and a pound of dry black beans/peas.
3 hours before dinner, I add chopped up carrots, celery, onions, garlic and potatoes, then salt, pepper and dry parsley.

Also, buckwheat is good for protein. I usually just boil it in water and serve it with a little sugar. The kids love it too!

Another tasty one: Red winter wheat berries (it's a grain). Take about 3 times more water than the grain. They take about 1 hr to boil, then I add honey and poppy seeds, maybe walnuts.

#46 Gina

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Posted 05 March 2007 - 08:44 PM

Many thanks for all the Lent suggestions.

I've experienced the "brain fog," too, and it helped to just be really conscious of getting protein every meal. Just adding in nuts or beans to a recipe helps.

Some things we like:

Beans & Greens: You need canned beans or chickpeas; 1 bunch of dark leafy greens like kale or chard; onion, garlic, veg broth, seasonings. I make this either "barbecue style" with canned tomatoes and some bbq sauce for flavor, or Italian style with lemon juice or Balsamic vinegar. Fry up the onion in a saute pan over low heat until soft (you can also braise it in water or veg broth if not using oil), add garlic and drained beans. Let this cook together while you wash the greens. Wash them very well- soaking in a deep pot or sink is best. Shake them off then remove any tough stems and roughly chop. Pile them high in your pan and let them steam down, stir, and add your seasonings and a little veg broth or water. Cook about 10 minutes or until the greens are tender according to your taste, adding in liquid as necessary. We eat this over rice, quinoa or pasta and it's quite good and filling.

You can also steam whole leaves of kale or chard and use them as a meat substitute in sandwiches or burritos.

Grilled Vegetable Sandwich: Marinate some chopped vegetables (zucchini, summer squash, mushrooms, onions, chunks of bell pepper, eggplant, etc.) in vinegar or any citrus juice, oil (optional), garlic, salt and pepper, herbs etc. Grill on a tabletop grill, or you could roast them in an oven. Eat on a whole-grain roll with lettuce and hummus or tahini.

Split Pea Soup:
1 med. onion, chopped
1 stalk celery, diced
1 lg. carrot, diced
2 tbsp. oil
1 tbsp. Hungarian paprika (optional)
2 cloves garlic, minced
2 quarts vegetable stock or water
2 1/2 cups split peas, rinsed
1 tsp. dried thyme
1 bay leaf
1 tsp. salt
1/2 tsp. pepper

Heat oil in a soup pot over low-medium heat and add onion, carrot and celery. Cook, stirring occasionally, til onion is soft but not brown. Add garlic and Hungarian paprika and stir another minute. Add the remaining ingredients and bring to a boil. Boil 20 minutes, then reduce heat and simmer til all ingredients are soft, about one hour. Remove bay leaf. If you like a smooth soup, push through a fine sieve. This works nicely in a crockpot, too. Serve with some hearty pumpernickel or whole-grain bread.

#47 John Charmley

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Posted 05 March 2007 - 09:26 PM

Dear Fr. Raphael,

It makes sense since we have an 'alternative life-style'.


Indeed, it might be argued that we have the only real life style!

In Christ,

John

#48 Simon

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Posted 05 March 2007 - 11:33 PM

I live in Italy, and found myself in a supermarket with my priest. I bought half a kilo of frozen snails - I don't know if you get them in America - and made a stew, frying some onion, garlic and mushrooms in oil before adding the snails, and then a little white wine, and finally some paprika. In the part of Italy where I live, polenta is a staple, and I had the snails with it yesterday.
Fresh snails are maybe even better, though they're a bit of a bind to prepare, as you have to keep them for three days, giving them lettuce to eat, in a muslin covered wooden box, after which they should be boiled for half an hour, taken out of their shells, and cooked in the above fashion for a couple of hours.
I had them on Sunday - a feast day, even though it's Lent, as far as I can understand -so I don't reproach myself too much for having enjoyed them!
Happy fasting to all,
Simon

#49 Nina

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Posted 06 March 2007 - 12:59 AM

I live in Italy, and found myself in a supermarket with my priest. I bought half a kilo of frozen snails - I don't know if you get them in America - and made a stew, frying some onion, garlic and mushrooms in oil before adding the snails, and then a little white wine, and finally some paprika. In the part of Italy where I live, polenta is a staple, and I had the snails with it yesterday.
Fresh snails are maybe even better, though they're a bit of a bind to prepare, as you have to keep them for three days, giving them lettuce to eat, in a muslin covered wooden box, after which they should be boiled for half an hour, taken out of their shells, and cooked in the above fashion for a couple of hours.
I had them on Sunday - a feast day, even though it's Lent, as far as I can understand -so I don't reproach myself too much for having enjoyed them!
Happy fasting to all,
Simon


Yes there are places here in US where you can get snails.
Last year I spent Orthodox Easter in Italy and I treasure the memories!
Buona Pasqua!

#50 Paul Cowan

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Posted 06 March 2007 - 03:16 AM

1 onion and 4 garlic cloves chopped fine, sauteed in butter until limp not browned

Add +/- 1 quart heavy cream then
4 fresh chicken thighs raw hand boned then cut into chunks
1 link sausage your choice thin sliced

Allow chicken to fully cook then thicken with Corn Starch.
Pour over cooked penne pasta or other large pasta.
Serve with fresh pepper.


Ohhh, wait a minute. That's what I'm cooking the day AFTER Pascha. Now where did I put that other recipe? :)

Paul

#51 Paul Cowan

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Posted 06 March 2007 - 03:24 AM

Sliced mushrooms and garlic as much as the pan will hold. Sautee in the mushroom juice, add 2 huge handfulls of fresh english peas still in the pods. Cook until very tender and add your favorite shellfish. I like mussels.

Mix with seasonings and toss with favorite pasta or just as a dish by itself and stay away from the extra carbs.

Paul

#52 Paul Cowan

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Posted 06 March 2007 - 03:32 AM

Nothing beats a good ol' fashion peanut butter and jelly sandwich.

In a meat grinder, grind 1 pound of roasted unsalted nuts, Your choice. Almonds are the healthiest.

In a mixing bowl add enough honey and peanut oil (1/3 cup each roughly) to taste or consistency. Will keep unrefrigerated for a couple of weeks before souring,

or longer in the fridge. It will be rock hard though.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
1 pound of berries (I like blackberries) mixed with 4 cups sugar and cook until a rolling boil you cannot stir down.

Pour into jars and steam bath for 10 minutes.

I will leave the bread recipe up to you.

These usually cost my customers $5.00 a jar each. Enjoy our home-made PB&J recipes.

Paul

#53 Simon

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Posted 06 March 2007 - 12:37 PM

There's a lady in the congregation at Venice who makes a Lenten cake called St. somebody's cake - I can't remember the name of the saint, which she offers around after Liturgy. As I no longer go to the Venice church, can anyone give me the recipe. Apparently, after making the cake, it is salutary to request divine intercession from the Saint. Simon

#54 Olga

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Posted 07 March 2007 - 07:20 AM

Now here's a Fr Raphael secret Lenten classic recipe.

Take two slices of bread (store bought- Winnipeg rye preferably).

Put margarine on bread. (don't forget to put margarine also on the second slice).

Put peanut butter on top of margarine on bread.

Now- Carefully place the two slices of bread together.

And there you go: Lent as practiced by thousands of cullinarily challenged Orthodox especially here in the developed west.


Knowledge of such culinary secrets must happen by some sort of mysterious osmosis. How else could peanut butter have spread itself (ha ha) as Lenten fare so comprehensively all over the world? My husband is entirely capable of demolishing a 500g (1lb) jar of the stuff (crunchy, of course) during Lent.

#55 Olga

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Posted 07 March 2007 - 07:46 AM

The cake you mention sounds like Phanouropita, normally baked in honour of St Phanourios (name also spelled with an F) of Rhodes, whose feast day is August 26. The recipes are many and varied, but all use lenten ingredients, including dried fruit, nuts and spices.The Fanouropita custom involves making the cake, and giving a piece to seven different households.

Before eating the cake, the person should ask God to have mercy on the soul of St Phanourios's mother, who, as legend has it, was "sinful", though the nature of her sinfulness is not clear. The saint is invoked in finding lost objects, or in revealing what is unclear or unknown. The saint's name is derived from the word phaneroma, meaning revelation.

As an aside, I can vouch for this saint's intercessions in finding what is lost. My family has known a lovely Greek man called Phanourios for over 45 years, and I could write a book about events in his life which utterly defy logic. Some of these include finding lost objects in preposterous circumstances. The only explanation which makes any sense is the intercession of his patron saint.

#56 Simon

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Posted 08 March 2007 - 07:32 AM

Dear Olga, thanks a lot for the info. I'm pretty certain this is the cake concerned. I'd be so glad if you could give me one of the many recipes for it, thanks, Simon

#57 Simon

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Posted 11 March 2007 - 08:19 PM

Well, I found the recipe on the net, and proceeded to make it. I had a view to offering a slice to people who seem lost in their lives, as well as enjoying the taste of it. Though not an accomplished cake baker, things went OK, except for a thought. "Probably," I said to myself, "there's nothing in all this, but at least I'll be playing a part, and..." So, I phoned the priest, a Serb, who's never heard of Phainouropita, and he agreed to bless it today, Sunday.
There was the cake, golden brown in the oven last night, looking lovely. I decided to take it out, in order to turn it out, and as I took it, inexplicably the oven cloth slipped, and I burnt my thumb on the cake tin, which overturned, spilling the whole cake into and around the oven.
Oh, I've been eating it OK, and it's tasty enough ,but of course, I didn't take it to church, and any attempt to give it around has been abandoned, as it's all in pieces.
I really believe St. Phainourion was angry with my, for my blasphemimg thought. Next time round, I won't harbour such doubts.
By the way, if anyone can get the right prayers for the cake in a Slavonic language, it would be nice, as my priest can't speak Greek.
Continued happy fasting - I mean, really it is happy, isn't it? -
May God help us,

Simon.

#58 Fr Raphael Vereshack

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Posted 11 March 2007 - 08:46 PM

By the way, if anyone can get the right prayers for the cake in a Slavonic language, it would be nice, as my priest can't speak Greek.


I checked both my 2 volume set and my abridged version of the Slavonic Trebnik but there is no such prayer in it.

I suspect this is very much a Greek tradition.

In Christ- Fr Raphael

#59 Nina

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Posted 14 March 2007 - 03:31 PM

Well, I found the recipe on the net, and proceeded to make it. I had a view to offering a slice to people who seem lost in their lives, as well as enjoying the taste of it. Though not an accomplished cake baker, things went OK, except for a thought. "Probably," I said to myself, "there's nothing in all this, but at least I'll be playing a part, and..." So, I phoned the priest, a Serb, who's never heard of Phainouropita, and he agreed to bless it today, Sunday.
There was the cake, golden brown in the oven last night, looking lovely. I decided to take it out, in order to turn it out, and as I took it, inexplicably the oven cloth slipped, and I burnt my thumb on the cake tin, which overturned, spilling the whole cake into and around the oven.
Oh, I've been eating it OK, and it's tasty enough ,but of course, I didn't take it to church, and any attempt to give it around has been abandoned, as it's all in pieces.
I really believe St. Phainourion was angry with my, for my blasphemimg thought. Next time round, I won't harbour such doubts.
By the way, if anyone can get the right prayers for the cake in a Slavonic language, it would be nice, as my priest can't speak Greek.
Continued happy fasting - I mean, really it is happy, isn't it? -
May God help us,

Simon.


Simon,

I do not think that St. Phanourios "was angry" with you. In contrary he has rejoiced about the fact that you were doing all that for his intercessions. Saints have much love and that is why they became Saints.

You can bake another Phanouropita and take it to church. Oh and please do not forget to pray for St. Phanourios' mother. It is his request to all of us.

#60 Paul Cowan

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Posted 03 April 2007 - 04:10 AM

I realize this is 2 days after the fact, but I wanted to write it down before I forgot it. I kinda went nuts on Palm Sunday at the Asian seafood market near our house. I bought the biggest catfish they had, which for Texas it was pretty small, only a 10 pounder. I had them fillet it and give me all the bones.

I boiled the bones in 2 gallons of water for 2 hours with chinese celery and an onion. strained the broth and cut up the vegetables and picked the meat off the bones. I only used the meat from the bones, The rest of the fish I froze until next week.

I then added cut-up chinese brocolli, baby boc choy and fresh green peas in the pods to the broth with the celery and onion. Cooked until tender. About 1/2 hour. The longer it cooks the more it reduces for a better taste.

Add the VERY carefully picked through fish (no bones) and 1 pound of seafood mix (crab, octopus, shrimp, calamari) or better yet, 1# cubed mixed medley of different fishes. (fruits de mer?) Cook until seafood mix is done but not over done. Slightly thicken with cornstarch and water.

I just added S&P to taste. Serve over rice or with oyster crackers or plain. No I could not eat it all so it also got frozen until next week.

Enjoy
Paul




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