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#41 Effie Ganatsios

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Posted 18 August 2007 - 08:13 PM

"Title: Imam Baldi
Categories: Vegetables
Yield: 6 servings

3 Japanese eggplants
2 Yellow onions, chopped
-coarsely
1 Tb. olive oil
1 lb Ripe tomatoes, chopped
-coarsely
3 Cloves fresh garlic, minced
1/2 ts Dried basil
1/2 ts Dried oregano
1/2 ts Salt, or to taste

Preheat the oven to 350F. Lightly oil a large baking dish.

Cut each eggplant in half lengthwise. Scoop out the insides and
coarsely chop them; set aside. Place the shells face down on a
baking sheet and bake for 15 minutes.

In a skillet over medium-high heat, saute onion in olive oil for 10
minutes, stirring frequently to prevent browning. Add tomatoes,
garlic, eggplant insides, basil and oregano. Simmer until soft,
about 10 minutes. Season with salt to taste.

Fill eggplant shells with mixture. Bake for 30 minutes. Serve hot.

Makes 6 servings.

The name of this recipe literally translates as “the Imam fainted”.
The legend goes that the ruler liked this dish so much, he fainted
with delight."


When we're not fasting we add a bechamel sauce on top of each eggplant shell and bake until lightly browned....................................................


Rick, post your picture because next we'll be talking about eskimos or something!!!

#42 Paul Cowan

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Posted 18 August 2007 - 08:18 PM

The name of this recipe literally translates as “the Imam fainted”.
The legend goes that the ruler liked this dish so much, he fainted
with delight."


Interesting. In the legend from the website I found it says the IMAM fainted because his wife used so much of olive oil. A full cup in that recipe. I suppose both can be true at the same time.

"Honey, that's the best ratatouille you ever made. You used how much?"

#43 Mary

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Posted 18 August 2007 - 08:24 PM

"Title: Imam Baldi


Ok - so it's not just any Imam, it has to be a bald one... interesting!

Aaaand now, I wish I could post the picture with my French flag here and thus in complete authority (from my kitchen) :) to tell you that ratatouille and imam bayaldi (at least the one from my family's recipe) may have as main ingredient aubergine, but are two different recipes. And the whole idea with imam bayaldi is to be very esthetical and not sloppy at all. You have to preserve the form of the aubergine so you can really convey the image of the 'fainted imam', or as some others translate it 'stuffed imam' - I am not sure which one is more correct.


This is getting to be more than interesting... not just any Imam, but a bald aborigine, who is also an Imam!

I'm glad I'm not bald! :)

Mary

#44 Effie Ganatsios

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Posted 18 August 2007 - 08:24 PM

Interesting. In the legend from the website I found it says the IMAM fainted because his wife used so much of olive oil. A full cup in that recipe. I suppose both can be true at the same time.

"Honey, that's dog gone good. You used how much?"


Probably both. Some women fry the eggplants but if you just brush them with a little olive oil and then grill them you use only a little and then your husband loves you and doesn't divorce you for squandering all his hard earned money, because, let's face it, olive oil is very expensive..............sending you home to your mama is definitely cheaper.

#45 Paul Cowan

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Posted 18 August 2007 - 08:30 PM

I think before Matthew scolds us for getting off topic, we should either post a profile picture of ourselves as a stuffed bald oily imam or move these posts over to the lenten recipe thread. ;)

Paul

#46 Nina

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Posted 18 August 2007 - 08:37 PM

Now you have me freaking out! Last I heard, an Imam is a muslim priest. You eat Imams?! And they're delicious?!!! :confused:

Nina... I hope you don't ever post a picture of yourself, and remind me to never give you my home address. Why, if run out of Imams for dinner, you might come after me!! :P

Mary.


Giggle....A LOT!

Dear Mary, what do you think? We are Christians and have been accused in the past for "cannibalism" - I have to state here that this is a joke.

Yes, you say that because you want to have exclusivity over the pictures I have emailed you. But I know where you live - la la la la la la.

Dear Effie,

Yes, I see that you make the one version of the dish which is very popular also here in the Greek community. Since my family was from the Poli, they make the version that is more similar of the area there. That is why we also call it bayalldi. So just versions.

Comparing the recipes we do not use:

Big eggplants. We use small (normal size) ones (2 eggplants for serving) - they call them here Italian eggplants.

also we do not use:

basil
oregano

and if there is no fasting time we use minced meat when preparing the stuffing for the imam.

However we use in our recipe:

lots of parsley,
1 bay leaf,
lots of garlic,
and red wine vinegar

#47 Marie+Duquette

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Posted 18 August 2007 - 11:25 PM

Since I'm having indi-gestion with all this food, I decided to simply go "blueberrying" ... these are the very best anti-oxidents in God's Creation!

marie-duquette

#48 Effie Ganatsios

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Posted 19 August 2007 - 04:40 AM

Giggle....A LOT!

Dear Mary, what do you think? We are Christians and have been accused in the past for "cannibalism" - I have to state here that this is a joke.

Yes, you say that because you want to have exclusivity over the pictures I have emailed you. But I know where you live - la la la la la la.

Dear Effie,

Yes, I see that you make the one version of the dish which is very popular also here in the Greek community. Since my family was from the Poli, they make the version that is more similar of the area there. That is why we also call it bayalldi. So just versions.

Comparing the recipes we do not use:

Big eggplants. We use small (normal size) ones (2 eggplants for serving) - they call them here Italian eggplants.

also we do not use:

basil
oregano

and if there is no fasting time we use minced meat when preparing the stuffing for the imam.

However we use in our recipe:

lots of parsley,
1 bay leaf,
lots of garlic,
and red wine vinegar


Nina, I downloaded the recipe I posted from an internet site. I also do it your way except for the bay leaf and red wine vinegar. I have a wonderfully aromatic laurel bush (daphne) from which I pick my leaves, the aroma is unbelievable, just opening a jar of dried bay leaves in winter is wonderful. I never knew that bay leaves had such a terrific aroma, which makes me wonder how many flavours and aromas we are missing from the commercial market that we don't even know about. My red wine vinegar is from our own wine - we have a vinegar barrel - and I use it for everything, even cleaning.

Nina, when you say Poli, you don't mean Constantinople do you? All the Asia Minor Greeks are famous for their cuisine.



Effie

p.s. when we fill eggplant shells with the minced meat mixture we call them
papoutsakia or scarpinakia = little shoes......................mmmmmmmm delicious...........

#49 Effie Ganatsios

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Posted 19 August 2007 - 04:45 AM

Since I'm having indi-gestion with all this food, I decided to simply go "blueberrying" ... these are the very best anti-oxidents in God's Creation!

marie-duquette


Maria, I can't find them here!!!!!!!!!!!! There is a wild variety on the mountain slopes around here that woman use to make a liqueur, but they're not the same. And as you said, the very best anti-oxident...........

Effie

#50 Herman Blaydoe

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Posted 19 August 2007 - 12:47 PM

I hereby declare this thread thoroughly and deliciously hijacked!

Herman

#51 Mary

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Posted 19 August 2007 - 06:16 PM

I hereby declare this thread thoroughly and deliciously hijacked!

Herman


and the best part is, you can eat as much as you want because it has zero calories and no artificial ingredients! =)

Mary

#52 Rick H.

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Posted 19 August 2007 - 06:26 PM

and the best part is, you can eat as much as you want because it has zero calories and no artificial ingredients! =)

Mary



Just like coffee! :)

#53 Rick H.

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Posted 19 August 2007 - 06:35 PM

Just like coffee! :)



Speaking of coffee . . . here's a reprint from an earlier discussion:

Monachos Lenten Latte:

Combine in a coffee grinder: 1 part espresso bean + 1 part espresso bean + 1 part espresso bean. Hold the grinder button down until your wife and/or kids start to be annoyed just a bit. Then fill espresso maker with water and turn button to "ON" position. Add espresso to steamed soy milk, with chocolate syrup and favorite flavors (viz. caramel and vanilla for 'Milky Way' latte) and enjoy with one of your favorite monachos threads.

#54 John Charmley

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Posted 19 August 2007 - 09:48 PM

Dear Rick,

And as you load up your photo and read your coffee recipe, perhaps some advice on pants might be useful?

Just a thought;)

John

#55 Rick H.

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Posted 20 August 2007 - 09:30 AM

Dear Rick,

And as you load up your photo and read your coffee recipe, perhaps some advice on pants might be useful?

Just a thought;)

John




Dear John,

Yes, photos, recipes, and fashion statements! But, we already have a pants thread--'women in pants.' So to avoid duplication or a lack of focus in this thread, I wonder if we are not lacking a 'men in pants' thread? Or, as we consider the field of cultural anthropology as it relates to Scotland, Greece, and other middle eastern countries, would we be politically incorrect to leave out a thread for 'men in skirts?'


For example, here's a simple, but stylish package featuring a casual kilt, leather sporran, kilt pin and a pair of kilt socks, colour matched to the kilt. Ideal for wearing with a football or rugby top.



[ATTACH]51[/ATTACH]


The Tartan Army, not too sure how good these guys would be on the battlefield but possibly a start to our new topic.


Rick

PS I don't really see how the socks are color matched to the quilt.

Attached Files



#56 John Charmley

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Posted 20 August 2007 - 09:58 AM

Dear Rick,

I am sure I saw that guy last time I was in Edinburgh. From what I remember about Scotsmen, I'm not sure that kilts would quite fit in with the more general theme of chaps and pants - viewers of Braveheart might recall why.

The theme of chaps in skirts reminds me inevitably of the (no doubt apocryphal) comment of the young child taken for the first time to Mass in a High Anglican Church who turned to its mother and asked: 'Why is that man wearing a dress, and does he know his handbag's on fire?' Such are the trials for those unused to men in clerical garb and censers.

:) John

p.s. You ought to make it clear (no disclaimers though) that that is not a photograph of you in the Henry tartan (is it?);)

#57 Nina

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Posted 20 August 2007 - 06:22 PM

Nina, I downloaded the recipe I posted from an internet site. I also do it your way except for the bay leaf and red wine vinegar.


The vinegar balances the oil. So it is the perfect combo.
We use bay leaf in almost everything. After cooking discard it because it is toxic if digested - I have read, not that I have tried it.

It is so great that you have home made/grown cooking things. That is the best.

And yes, I meant Constantinople. They make a cold soup (gazpacho-but not Spanish :)) also to go with it. Now in summer that combination is fantastic. So cooling and refreshing meal! I love that soup but it is not for everyone, or always... it has lots of garlic so it is anti-social... actually it is anti-everything :) like the 'Seinfeld' episode with Kavorka. :) You can see it on YouTube if you have never seen it.

p.s. when we fill eggplant shells with the minced meat mixture we call them
papoutsakia or scarpinakia = little shoes......................mmmmmmmm delicious...........


Yes. :) But I was afraid to reveal this information because Mary's comments (imagination) might run wild :).

#58 Mary

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Posted 20 August 2007 - 10:00 PM

Yes. :) But I was afraid to reveal this information because Mary's comments (imagination) might run wild :).


Thank you for helping me preserve the few shreds of rational thinking remaining in my brain cells. :P

#59 Effie Ganatsios

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Posted 21 August 2007 - 05:27 AM

The vinegar balances the oil. So it is the perfect combo.
We use bay leaf in almost everything. After cooking discard it because it is toxic if digested - I have read, not that I have tried it.

It is so great that you have home made/grown cooking things. That is the best.

And yes, I meant Constantinople. They make a cold soup (gazpacho-but not Spanish :)) also to go with it. Now in summer that combination is fantastic. So cooling and refreshing meal! I love that soup but it is not for everyone, or always... it has lots of garlic so it is anti-social... actually it is anti-everything :) like the 'Seinfeld' episode with Kavorka. :) You can see it on YouTube if you have never seen it.



Yes. :) But I was afraid to reveal this information because Mary's comments (imagination) might run wild :).


I definitely want the recipe for your soup.

"Little shoes" does sound really strange, doesn't it? Why "little shoes" and not "little boats" or something??

The Imam fainting is not so bad either. I wonder what other strange names for dishes are floating around.............

The Greek women from Constantinople are famous for their cooking, for taking care of their households and their husbands, and for their beauty.

God's bounty : cinnamon, bay leaves, cloves........ mmm what man-made aroma can match these

Nina, I don't know if any of Maria Ioannidou's books have been translated into English but if they have I highly recommend that you buy them. One in particular - Loxanne (Λωξαντρα) is one of my favourite books. Her books are about her family when they lived in Constantinople and about their life there before the Turks forced the Greeks to leave their ancient homelands. She is a Constantinopolitissa................... a woman from Constantinople.

#60 Nina

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Posted 21 August 2007 - 02:52 PM

I definitely want the recipe for your soup.


Of course, Effie! I can PM it to you.

"Little shoes" does sound really strange, doesn't it? Why "little shoes" and not "little boats" or something??


I like your suggestion. :) Mary is right that some dishes have weird names.

God's bounty : cinnamon, bay leaves, cloves........ mmm what man-made aroma can match these


I agree! Actually they make here potpourri, with the ingredients you mentioned, for Christmas. Cinnamon and Christmas are very connected here... (I miss Christmas!)

Also in northern Europe they make a mulled wine which is called Glühwein and the entire house smells like cinnamon, cloves etc. And it is amazing because I came across an old recipe book, which used the ingredients for Glühwein and called it the 'Hippocrates's wine' (although Hippocrates's wine is different - from what I have read, although I am not very sure because many things are attributed to him).

Nina, I don't know if any of Maria Ioannidou's books have been translated into English but if they have I highly recommend that you buy them. One in particular - Loxanne (Λωξαντρα) is one of my favourite books. Her books are about her family when they lived in Constantinople and about their life there before the Turks forced the Greeks to leave their ancient homelands. She is a Constantinopolitissa................... a woman from Constantinople.


This would be so interesting! I will research about her thank you for letting me know!

I hope we are ok here... because this is the 'Test Area'... or maybe we should move these posts to Lenten recipes? Although wine is not so Lenten :) - speaking of which...

I thought of an argument for those who do not believe what the Fathers say about the bread and wine becoming the real Body and Blood of Christ: if we can not drink wine during Lent, how come we receive it at church, unless it is the Blood of Christ as Fathers say (appearing to our senses as wine) ?




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