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Eating blood


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#21 Algernon

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Posted 29 July 2014 - 03:15 PM

Apostolic Canon 63: If any Bishop, or Presbyter, or Deacon, or anyone else on the sacerdotal list at all, eat meat in the blood of its soul, or that has been killed by a wild beast, or that has died a natural death, let him be deposed. For the Law has forbidden this. But if any layman do the same, let him be excommunicated.

 

What "Law"?



#22 Phoebe K.

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Posted 29 July 2014 - 04:39 PM

The Law which is being referred to hear is the Jewish Law in the Old Testament against the consumption of Blood which the Apostles in the Counsel of Jerusalem indicated that all Christians should follow as well.

 

Blood of animals being closely linked to the sacrifices of the OT and to Idols. As well of course as the explicit command form God to Noah to not eat the blood of the animals when the Lord permitted humans to eat animals.  The command about blood predates the Abraham covernet, so like the commands and promises from that time holds for all humanity not just a specific people.

 

Phoebe



#23 Michał

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Posted 06 August 2014 - 07:19 AM

Eating dishes containing blood is fairly popular here among everyone including priests. I have to admit I like some.



#24 Kosta

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Posted 10 August 2014 - 07:03 AM

I'm not talking about sucking the blood from a living animal. I'm talking about blood cakes, blood sausage, etc that comes from a dead animal.

 

 

We are not to eat blood regardless. In fact we are not to even eat animals that have been strangled or that have died natural deaths. Animals are to be slaughtered only,  that way their blood can pour out and be received back into the earth.


Edited by Kosta, 10 August 2014 - 07:05 AM.


#25 Michał

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Posted 10 August 2014 - 09:58 PM

So any idea what it has been ignored in Slavic countries?



#26 Rdr Andreas

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Posted 14 August 2014 - 09:00 AM

So any idea what it has been ignored in Slavic countries?

 

Same reason as many things are done in supposedly Orthodox countries which ought not to be done.



#27 Ben Johnson

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Posted 07 September 2014 - 05:10 AM

I wonder how healthy it is to eat blood?



#28 Michał

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Posted 07 September 2014 - 01:40 PM

I wonder how healthy it is to eat blood?

 

Very good. It is a very good source of vitamins and minerals.



#29 Rdr Andreas

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Posted 07 September 2014 - 02:19 PM

It seems that those here who want to and do eat blood (as in black pudding/blood sausage) disregard the sayings of the Holy Fathers, and what Fr David said.



#30 Michał

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Posted 08 September 2014 - 08:45 AM

It seems that those here who want to and do eat blood (as in black pudding/blood sausage) disregard the sayings of the Holy Fathers, and what Fr David said.

 

 

I am  pretty sure other posters disregard fathers in some other ways. Not sure about Fr. David since I have no idea who is he.

 

So you are more venerable than me, a fan of blood sausage, head cheese and stuff like that. So?



#31 Rdr Andreas

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Posted 08 September 2014 - 12:23 PM

I said nothing about myself and you are free to follow your own will.



#32 Olga

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Posted 08 September 2014 - 12:50 PM

I am  pretty sure other posters disregard fathers in some other ways. Not sure about Fr. David since I have no idea who is he.
 
So you are more venerable than me, a fan of blood sausage, head cheese and stuff like that. So?

 
Dear Michał
 
May I remind you that it is expected for members of this forum to conduct themselves in a civil manner. Smugness and arrogance have no place here, and in particular when the targets are an archpriest and a tonsured reader.

 

Please bear this in mind when posting in the future.



#33 Rdr Daniel (R.)

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Posted 08 September 2014 - 03:33 PM

What we must bear in mind here is that although our opinions may differ  we are Orthodox Christians and therefore must try to obey the teachings of the Church. The teaching of the Church is that we do not consume blood as set out in the Apostolic council of Jerusalem: 

 

"The Apostles, and the presbyters, and the brethren, to those in Antioch, and Syria, and Cilicia, brethren who are of the nations, greetings.

 

Seeing we have heard that certain having gone forth from us did trouble you with words, subverting your souls, saying to be circumcised and to keep the law, to whom we did give no charge, it seemed good to us, having come together with one accord, chosen men to send unto you, with our beloved Barnabas and Paul, men who have given up their lives for the name of our Lord Jesus Christ. We have sent, therefore, Judas and Silas, and they by word are telling the same things

 

For it seemed good to the Holy Spirit, and to us, no more burden to lay upon you, except these necessary things, to abstain from things offered to idols, and from blood, and from strangled things, and from sexual immorality; from which keeping yourselves, ye shall do well. 

 

Farewell." - Epistle of the Holy Ecumenical Council of Jerusalem - Acts of the Apostles. Emphasis mine.

 

In Christ.

Daniel,


Edited by Daniel R., 08 September 2014 - 03:34 PM.


#34 H. Smith

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Posted 29 January 2015 - 06:26 PM

OK, let's talk about blood dishes in Orthodox countries.

First, I heard on one forum that Mayiritsa, the Greek soup had blood, but I think that it's just the intestines like you say.

 

Second, I heard that ancient Greece, particularly Sparta, had a "black soup" called "melas zomos", made of blood. I don't know if Greeks still eat it.

 

Third, some places say that the Greek "loukanika" sausage is made with blood, but I am not sure if that's always true.

 

Serbia has krvavice, blood sausage. Belarus does too, where it is called "крывяная каўбаса" (literally: "blood sausage").

 

I am sure that it's rare for Palestinian Orthodox to eat blood, since their broader society's culture came from or was influenced a lot by Judaism and Islam. One Palestinian writer talked about how their family reacted to cultural differences in the larger world when they went abroad: "[I]n Roumania in the 1970's Hassan Ahmad suffered the same fate: this time the food on his plate was blood sausage. He was a guest at the home of a Roumanian family and he just looked at the hostess and declared that he simply could not eat it." (Children of Bethany: The Story of a Palestinian Family, By Saïd K. Aburish)

 

What about my own experience?

Blood sausage from pork is popular in Polish food (kishka), as is duck blood soup. I have had both and am not a special fan of either, although as far as taste goes, I would eat them if someone served them to me. The kishka was dark and a bit soggy if I remember it right. They both tasted a bit like iron and blood. They weren't awful. I think the first time I had czernina, duck blood soup, when I was hungry, I liked it more than the second time. I love trying different foods, but those are not something I particularly like.

 

I had a kosher version of Polish kishka I bought in a Jewish-owned supermarket in the US and liked it. It was comparable to other sausages and pork products, except it seemed more moist and softer.

 

By comparison with non-blood products, I don't like hamloaf, which is even softer. I do like scrapple, but it doesn't taste especially healthy.



#35 H. Smith

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Posted 29 January 2015 - 06:41 PM

I would like to try Irish blood pudding that they make like a sausage and eat with their breakfast, but am concerned about breaking the canon.



#36 H. Smith

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Posted 29 January 2015 - 06:42 PM

Also, I am curious as to how Greek priests react to the fact that their culture has blood foods when the canons and the New Testament (Acts 15) are against it.



#37 Brian Patrick Mitchell

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Posted 29 January 2015 - 07:29 PM

It has long seemed to me that the things forbidden in Acts 15:29 refer to three categories of things to avoid:

 

1. Things inherently immoral, like fornication.

2. Things that are not inherently immoral, and are in fact sometimes permissible, but that might cause someone weak of faith to stumble, like eating meat offered to idols.

3. Things that are not inherently immoral but that are in character unseemly or disgusting and therefore are spiritually hazardous, like eating blood (or animals strangled so as not to drain them of blood).

 

The patristic quotations above seem to express the concern stated in 3.



#38 Kosta

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Posted 30 January 2015 - 02:49 AM


Also, I am curious as to how Greek priests react that their culture has blood foods when the canons and the New Testament (Acts 15) are against it.


The greeks have blood foods??? Im greek and a cook and I don't know of any blood foods.

Edited by Kosta, 30 January 2015 - 02:49 AM.


#39 Michał

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Posted 30 January 2015 - 05:00 PM

 Blood sausage from pork is popular in Polish food (kishka), as is duck blood soup. I have had both and am not a special fan of either, although as far as taste goes, I would eat them if someone served them to me. The kishka was dark and a bit soggy if I remember it right. They both tasted a bit like iron and blood. They weren't awful. I think the first time I had czernina, duck blood soup, when I was hungry, I liked it more than the second time. I love trying different foods, but those are not something I particularly like.

 

Had blood sausage twice this week. The first time it was poor quality and not very good, but for the second time it was much better.

 

Never had tried blood soup, though. We made it from pork (not duck) and I denied when I was offered it becuase of disgust. Now I regret because it looks like I will not have an opportunity to try it again (same for fried brains).



#40 Anton S.

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Posted 02 February 2015 - 07:52 AM

I have been in the Church for quite a long time and have never been aware of this prohibition of eating blood. So, when I read this thread, I went to our parish priest and asked him if it was really a sin to eat blood. He told me that it was.

 

Somehow, priests do not often warn people of that in our country. I am not sure whether it is because food made from or with blood is not much eaten here or because they do not consider it a serious sin. In any case, I am glad that I have not (as far as I remember) eaten blood sausage since I was baptized.

 

So, for many years I have live thinking that no food was considered absolutely prohibited to Orthodox Christians except for that dedicated to idols (pagan deities) and the flesh of strangled animals.

 

By the way, when I asked, many years ago, a very wise and prayerful hieromonk if it was unacceptable to eat food sold by Krishnaites (they always dedicate their food to Krishna before as much as to taste it), he answered that everything depended on the strength of your faith, as the Lord promised to His disciples that they would not be harmed even by poisoned food. But, the hieromonk continued, as we do not have such ardent faith, we should not take any risks.

 

I wonder, if this can refer to blood as well? Or is eating blood intrinsically harmful? And why, then, our priests do not speak about that more often?






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