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The 'great schism' - a positive event?


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#21 Kosta

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Posted 14 December 2009 - 04:21 AM

Some historians will say classical learning came to Europe from Constantinople; some historians will say it came through Spain.


I would agree with both. The seedlings of classical learning may have even ignited in Italy after 1204, when large amounts of booty was carried off from Constantinople. After the fall of Constantinople many byzantine romans fled to the city-states of Italy. Some even before such as Manuel Chrysolarus. You also had the Moors of Spain contributing alot. Many greek manuscripts translated into arabic and into the european languages. There was an italian renaissance and a spanish rennaisance. Throw in the invention of the gutenberg press to tie everything together and you have a renaissance.

#22 Speros

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Posted 14 December 2009 - 06:30 AM

I hope this Phyliss person isnt a scholar. First off at that time Orthodoxy was shrinking due to the advance of Islam. Alexandria and Syria was no more. Asia Minor eventualy was taken over by Turks and Islam introduced. This weakening of the eastern empire is a major factor in the schism. Rome began to look westward more and more. There was a cultural shift.

Secondly the renaisance came to be because as Islam entered western Europe, they brought with them greek books from places like Alexandria. These spurned a revival in western europe lifting them out of the dark ages. The muslims actually used these books more for cooking than anything, so no they were not trashed once they got into western hands.
As Olga has said the growth of Orthodoxy occured in the 8th century because of conversion of northern territories not east. Even a highschool drop out knows this.


Tickle is a well known scholar of theology and church history. While bad things happened as a result of the schism, they shouldn't cause one to overlook the good. There was widespread missionary effort by the Eastern Church post-Schism. And the Eastern Church was able to preserve its identity largely because of its split with Rome.

#23 Herman Blaydoe

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Posted 14 December 2009 - 12:53 PM

Tickle is a well known scholar of theology and church history. While bad things happened as a result of the schism, they shouldn't cause one to overlook the good. There was widespread missionary effort by the Eastern Church post-Schism. And the Eastern Church was able to preserve its identity largely because of its split with Rome.


It is not about "preserving identity", it is about preserving the Apostolic Witness, it is about preserving Truth. The split caused the Truth to be diluted in the west and led to further splits in the so-called "reformation". "How good and pleasant it is, when brothers dwell in unity" says the psalmist. The split was neither good nor pleasant. Unity and like-mindedness were a recurring theme in the letters of the Apostles. So sad it gets such short shrift in today's designer religions.




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