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Patron saint for Lisa?


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#1 Katrina Delsante

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Posted 21 June 2007 - 08:19 PM

Is there a patron saint for women named Lisa? Since it is such a popular name for Italian-American girls it seems like there should be some saint, at least in the West for this name. Perhaps Lisa is a derivation of some longer name? I have no clue (sadly a frequent occurence!).

Any help is appreciated!

Katrina:)

#2 Peter Farrington

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Posted 21 June 2007 - 09:13 PM

Dear Katrina

I think that Lisa is a shortened form on Eli-LISA-beth so there are lots of saints to chose from.

In Christ

Peter

#3 Dcn Alexander Haig

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Posted 21 June 2007 - 09:16 PM

Is there a patron saint for women named Lisa? Since it is such a popular name for Italian-American girls it seems like there should be some saint, at least in the West for this name. Perhaps Lisa is a derivation of some longer name? I have no clue (sadly a frequent occurence!).

Any help is appreciated!

Katrina:)



'Lisa' is short for 'Elizabeth'. The two main saints (although there are others) are:
  • St Elizabeth the Mother of St John the Baptist (5 September)
  • Grand Duchess Elizabeth (5/18 July)
With love in Christ

Alex

#4 John Charmley

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Posted 21 June 2007 - 09:41 PM

Dear Katrina,

There is an Akathist to the Holy Royal Martyr (and an ikon) here:
http://www.serfes.or...toelizabeth.htm

In Christ,

John

#5 Katrina Delsante

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Posted 22 June 2007 - 12:25 AM

Of course! Sheesh...I am such a dope sometimes. How did I not figure this out?:P I love the Grand Duchess Elisabeth! She'll be hearing from me real soon!

Here's the funny thing too. My sister and I were talking about the spelling of Elisabeth just the other day. I'm one of those sorry souls who needs God to tell them something like a hundred times before they get it. He literally has to spell things out for me sometimes (as was the case here for sure!)

I apologize for the interruption of this wonderful website. I'll just go back to my usual routine of making dinner and changing diapers and leave this forum to the really smart people.

Thanks a bunch for your help!

Katrina

#6 John Charmley

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Posted 22 June 2007 - 10:49 AM

Dear Katrina,

I'll just go back to my usual routine of making dinner and changing diapers and leave this forum to the really smart people.

Sounds like you are doing something more serviceable to the Lord in a day than some of us manage in a week - so we'd miss your presence here.:)

Glad we were able to help.

In Christ,

John

#7 James Blackstock

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Posted 24 June 2007 - 12:41 PM

I was intrigued by this little thread and it reminded me that some time ago, I tried to find out more about the name Linda (my wife is Linda) I received some info from a monk in Greece who informed me that the name Linda had it's origin in the Greek language....[I thought this sounded like something that came from the movie "My Big Fat Greek Wedding"] He went on to say that there was a Patron Saint for this name...St Golindenaux! Does anyone here know anything about a Saint for this name? Was Saint Golindenaux a real person? Skeptical...

#8 Effie Ganatsios

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Posted 24 June 2007 - 04:55 PM

James, Greek priests have a little book with all the saints names in it (even those that are rarely heard).

My name Effie is a pet name for Euterpe - an ancient greek name. Euterpe was one of the 9 muses. She was the muse of music. I was named for my grandmother which is the tradition here.

Ancient Greek names usually don't have a Saint's day and I was always under the impression that there was no St. Euterpe. However, my priest found it for me in his little book.

So there just might be a saint with the name the priest gave you.

This question of names and where they come from is a little sad. I have heard of people in some countries naming their children after film stars and singers.

As for the name Linda, without being very certain, I think it might be German.

In Greece we have the name Melinda - which means lovely honey.

Effie

#9 Father David Moser

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Posted 24 June 2007 - 07:11 PM

Golindenaux! Does anyone here know anything about a Saint for this name? Was Saint Golindenaux a real person? Skeptical...


This sounds a lot like the Martyr Maria Golindhuka (I have seen/heard this name in a dozen different iterations). Maria was, as I recall, the daughter of a Persian nobleman. She became a Christian and was arrested and tortured for her faith. Whenever she was tortured to exhaustion and left to die, she would be miraculously healed. The king finally threw her in a pit/locked her in a deep dungeon and left her to die where she was forgotten. For many years she had neither food nor water - but she continued to pray and put her hope in Christ. Our Lord sent to her an angel who granted Maria the gift of no longer requiring food or drink to live and so she survived and struggled in prayer forgotton in the dungeon. Many years later she was discovered, still alive, and was released. She returned to the Christian community where she told of God's providence for her and continued to glorify God. Even after her release she retained the gift of God needing neither food nor drink, although she would always taste a little food when in public so as not to scandalize others or make public the miracle of God. She did travel to Constantinople later in her life and there her story was made known to the Church.

The above is a very rough sketch depending on my faulty memory - I have copy of the life somewhere, but right now the only place on my desk that isn't covered by piles of books and papers is my computer so it'll take some time to find.

Fr David Moser

#10 James Blackstock

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Posted 24 June 2007 - 11:05 PM

Fr:, if you find it please let me know. Perhaps someday I can find an Icon of this saint for my wonderful wife...(we've been married for 37 years, believe me she is already a saint!)

#11 Paul Cowan

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Posted 25 June 2007 - 12:34 AM

Fr. David,

The above is a very rough sketch depending on my faulty memory - I have copy of the life somewhere, but right now the only place on my desk that isn't covered by piles of books and papers is my computer so it'll take some time to find.


You are a very modest and humble person. But you have been found out. ;)

Holy Martyr Maria (Golindhuka) of Persia, was sewn into a wineskin and cast into a pit to die. But God nourished her with invisible food and drink, and she remained alive. Later, she spent many months in a pit with wild animals, where she was given neither food nor drink. When she was hungry, an angel appeared to her and, making the sign of the Cross, touched her lips, saying, "Henceforth thou shalt feel neither hunger, nor thirst; and if, as one who art not yet incorporeal, thou desirest to eat, such will be according to thine own volition." The Saint finally escaped and went to live among the Christians of Persia, strengthening and encouraging them, but even there the Saint experienced neither hunger nor thirst, although at times, wishing to show that she was not a ghost, she would take a little piece of bread and, moistening it with water, would eat thereof.


This snippett from http://roca.org/OA/134/134a.htm an editorial you wrote "Strength to Resist".

Paul

#12 Father David Moser

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Posted 25 June 2007 - 02:46 AM

This snippett from http://roca.org/OA/134/134a.htm an editorial you wrote "Strength to Resist".


Well, thanks to my faulty memory, I must say that I had completely forgotten about writing that. Thanks for the trip down memory lane.

Fr David Moser




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