Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

Introductions from 2007

new members

  • This topic is locked This topic is locked
734 replies to this topic

#41 Anastasios Theofilou

Anastasios Theofilou

    Junior Poster

  • Members
  • 0 posts

Posted 15 January 2007 - 03:56 PM

Hello,
My name is Anastasios. I am married, I have four children.
Christ is risen!

#42 Peter Farrington

Peter Farrington

    Very Frequent Poster

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 647 posts

Posted 15 January 2007 - 04:22 PM

Hi Anastasios

And a warm welcome to this forum.

I am also married and also have four children.

This place can often be a welcome break! :)

Peter

#43 John Charmley

John Charmley

    Very Frequent Poster

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,101 posts
  • Guest from Another Religious Tradition

Posted 15 January 2007 - 05:07 PM

Dear Anastasios,

A warm welcome to Monachos.

I hope you find what you need here.:)

In Christ,

John

#44 Rose

Rose

    Junior Poster

  • Members
  • 1 posts

Posted 16 January 2007 - 08:35 PM

Hi everyone,:)
Our family will be expecting our first grandchild (sex unknown as of now), and this baby will be raised in the Greek Orthodox religion. I'm lost. There is so much I don't know and would like to learn, so that I don't feel so "left out." I understand that the baptism is a very long ceremony. Can someone kindly explain Orthodox baptism to me; age of the baby, the need for two sets of clothing, the oil, the baby being submerged three times, I would be most grateful for any information. My son was married in a Greek Orthodox ceremony. I am a practicing Lutheran.

#45 Fr Raphael Vereshack

Fr Raphael Vereshack

    Moderator

  • Moderators
  • 4,420 posts
  • Orthodox Christian Member
  • Verified Monastic Cleric

Posted 16 January 2007 - 11:06 PM

Hi everyone,:)
Our family will be expecting our first grandchild (sex unknown as of now), and this baby will be raised in the Greek Orthodox religion. I'm lost. There is so much I don't know and would like to learn, so that I don't feel so "left out." I understand that the baptism is a very long ceremony. Can someone kindly explain Orthodox baptism to me; age of the baby, the need for two sets of clothing, the oil, the baby being submerged three times, I would be most grateful for any information. My son was married in a Greek Orthodox ceremony. I am a practicing Lutheran.


Hello Rose. I am an Orthodox priest. I have baptized quite a few infants (and adults also) over the years. I am sure that other priests present on this forum can also add to what I will say.

There are a number of different traditions within Orthodoxy about when the baby should be baptized. But in general nowadays it is common that we wait 40 days. As to the proper age for when a baby or anyone else for that matter should be baptized the only really suitable answer is as soon as the time is right. No age is too young because in the Orthodox Church we accept infant baptism. Normally however most do wait 40 days before baptizing the newly born child.

When someone is baptized in the Orthodox Church they are immediately clothed in a white baptismal robe after the three immersions. Normally for a baby this is a white dress. Since the child would be baptized naked this means that before the baptism or immersing in the water all clothes or diaper needs to be removed. Hence I suppose the reference to two sets of clothing; ie what the child would wear to church & then the white dress after the baptism.

Oil could refer to two different things during the baptismal service. Probably you are referring to the oil with which the child would be anointed right before the immersion in baptism. This is a normal part of the service. First the oil which would be in a container of some kind is blessed with a brief prayer. Then the child is anointed with the blessed oil on various parts of the body. The remaining oil in the container is then poured into the baptismal font to the chant of Alleluia.

The Greeks pour a very large amount of oil into the baptismal font and if I recall correctly (I am a Russian priest and have only been to one baptism in a Greek church before) rub the person down with the oil before the baptism. So this would be very striking to anyone watching.

There is another anointing with a very special type of oil called myrrh. This anointing is done after the baptism/immersion and is considered a sacrament. But I think you may be referring to the first kind of anointing with oil.

The reason the child is immersed three times is that the baptized goes down into the water in representation of Christ's death and then comes up again in representation of Christ's resurrection. The reason for three immersions is that the person is baptized in the Name of the Three Persons of the Holy Trinity. Hence when the person is baptized the priest says, "the servant of God (name) is baptized in the Name of the Father (immersion), and of the Son (immersion) and of the Holy Spirit (immersion).

The immersing of children in Baptism can seem fearsome to someone who has not witnessed this before. But do not fear- no child has ever been hurt after 2000 years of baptizing in this way. Also many priests have ways of covering the child's face when they are baptized in the water. Normally everyone will pitch in and try to help so don't worry.

I hope these few words of explanation are of some help. Mainly keep in mind that for us Baptism is a most joyous occasion when someone is brought into the Church of Christ.

In Christ- Fr Raphael

#46 Tanya Hoadley

Tanya Hoadley

    Regular Poster

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 60 posts

Posted 17 January 2007 - 12:53 AM

Dear Rose,

Welcome! I am sure that members on this site will answer your questions far better than I could.

As you learn about Orthodox Baptism, I'm sure you will find many ways of sharing in this most wonderous sacrament.

When my first child was baptised, I made a beautiful baptismal gown and my mother embroidered it. (So beautiful and delicate are her stiches.) Mom also bought a thick, white baby bath blanket (the ones with the extra small triangle of cloth that cover the baby's head). This was perfect for covering the wet and somewhat oily baby after immersion. The hardest part is trying to dress the slippery little bundle of joy!

In Christ,
Tanya

#47 Rose

Rose

    Junior Poster

  • Members
  • 1 posts

Posted 17 January 2007 - 03:22 PM

Dear Father Raphael,
Thank you so much for the detailed explanation of the baptism. We also view baptism as a very joyous occasion (even though we do it a little less intensely) and are so looking forward to the birth of our first grandchild!

Tanya thank you for the info on the bath blanket. Sounds like a terrific idea.

As a non-Greek and non-Orthodox person, I need all the help and advice I can get. It is very much appreciated.

#48 Cyprian (Humphrey)

Cyprian (Humphrey)

    Frequent Poster

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 314 posts

Posted 17 January 2007 - 07:52 PM

Greetings to one and all!

I have "lurked" around this site and read through threads for a while before deciding to join. It's not likely that I'll have much to say, as there seem to be a considerable number of highly knowledgable persons who will post what needs to be said far before I could even fully comprehend the situation.

Unless anyone has any questions about Canadian military administration and/or small party raiding tactics :rolleyes: . That's just my joke because I am an ex-soldier, and being a clerk in the military, I was employed often as the imaginary "enemy force" for exercises and we often imitated, as best we could, small party recconassaince and raids on the "good guys". I seriously doubt anyone here would ever want to know about that.:)

But now, I am a monk (rhiasaphormonk specifically) living remotely from my monastic community (the Monastic Community of St Silouan the Athonite, Ottawa, ON, Canada), with the blessing of the abbot (Bp SERAPHIM), specifically due to some personal and financial obligations. So now I live as lone monk, going to a parish church, and being "undercover" Monday to Friday 8:00am to 4:00pm. Kind of a weird, almost schizoid, experience, which I fully intend to not be permanent.

Please pray for me, the sinner

Cyprian

#49 John Charmley

John Charmley

    Very Frequent Poster

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,101 posts
  • Guest from Another Religious Tradition

Posted 17 January 2007 - 10:11 PM

Dear Cyprian,

It is always a big moment when the lurking turns to joining - so welcome here. You are in an interesting, and possibly unique situation by the sound of it, and I should be very surprised if you did not have much to contribute.

Although the old 'reputation' system is no longer with us, I know from it that some of the most active members of this site rarely actually post - but read and pray.

I hope that whatever it is you are seeking here you will find - and much more.

In Christ,

John

#50 Trudy

Trudy

    Retired member, no longer active on forum

  • Guests
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 190 posts

Posted 18 January 2007 - 03:05 AM

But now, I am a monk (rhiasaphormonk specifically) living remotely from my monastic community (the Monastic Community of St Silouan the Athonite, Ottawa, ON, Canada), with the blessing of the abbot (Bp SERAPHIM), specifically due to some personal and financial obligations. So now I live as lone monk, going to a parish church, and being "undercover" Monday to Friday 8:00am to 4:00pm. Kind of a weird, almost schizoid, experience, which I fully intend to not be permanent.


Dear Brother in Christ Cyprian,

May I add my humble welcome to the others here.

Truly you are far from home and that must be difficult, as well as your situation. May God grant you strength to endure.

It is wonderful to have another monk on this discussion board. Perhaps you've read some of Fr. Seraphim Black's posts? I do hope you will share thoughts as you feel lead.

In Christ,
Athanasia

PS: Thank you for the good quote on your profile. It is good to keep it in my mind.

#51 Caroline MacDonald-Haig

Caroline MacDonald-Haig

    Junior Poster

  • Members
  • 0 posts

Posted 18 January 2007 - 06:37 PM

A new member to this site, directed via a short course on Theology run by St Paul's Theological Centre at Holy Trinity Brompton, London. Checking out the text of our first lecture on Constantine and the Monks of the Desert.

#52 Cyprian (Humphrey)

Cyprian (Humphrey)

    Frequent Poster

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 314 posts

Posted 18 January 2007 - 06:52 PM

Thank you both for your kind words. I have sometimes been the recipient of some criticism for being a monastic outside a monastery, but it's nice to know there is also some encouragement at times.

Fr Cyp

#53 Peter Farrington

Peter Farrington

    Very Frequent Poster

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 647 posts

Posted 18 January 2007 - 06:57 PM

Hi Caroline

A warm welcome to the site. I hope it is helpful to you in many ways.

Best wishes

Peter

#54 Marie A.

Marie A.

    Regular Poster

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 35 posts

Posted 18 January 2007 - 08:21 PM

Welcome to the site, Caroline. I've been a member for awhile but I'm mostly a lurker. My dh and I entered the Orthodox Church on the eve of the Feast of the Nativity of our Lord Jesus Christ in December. I have learned much here and it has been very helpful in my journey to the Orthodox faith. BTW my dh is a former Episcopalian and I am a former Roman Catholic.

Peace in Our Lord Jesus Christ,
Marie

#55 John Charmley

John Charmley

    Very Frequent Poster

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,101 posts
  • Guest from Another Religious Tradition

Posted 19 January 2007 - 12:09 AM

Dear Caroline,

Welcome - nice to have another Anglican here. I hope that you will find not only information you want here, but also things you need. Enjoy the community.

In Christ,

John

#56 Nina

Nina

    Very Frequent Poster

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,149 posts

Posted 19 January 2007 - 04:12 PM

Greetings in Christ to you all!

I found monachos.net while looking for some info about Byzantine hymns. I am impressed from the site and glad at the same time because I have learned so much (and I have only been through 10% of the site's contents) and still learning from it.

Nina

#57 Maria Murray

Maria Murray

    Regular Poster

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 63 posts

Posted 19 January 2007 - 06:06 PM

Thank you all for your warm welcome comments, they are very much appreciated! This place has been of much great help already. I don't know if my opinions and distorted thoughts can be worth much to the people of such depth here, but I wanted to share a couple of things about my journey in response to John.

As I had some experiences in the Orthodox church when I was younger, they always painted my perception as insincere rituals the people were following out of duty that didn't have any effect in their lives. Indeed this is was left in my mind because that's what it was for me. I have no idea why it never occurred to me to somehow investigate this further. I specifically remember standing in church during the Liturgy thinking, I am supposed to be closer to God here, but why do I feel so far from even caring about that? Every visit to church was mostly filled with some sort of frustration. I was very intimidated by clergy as well and was fearful to even come in close proximity to them somehow imagining I'd be struck by lightning or they would get mad at me and consider me a horrible sinner unworthy of being in a church. Such terrible misunderstandings and blindness permiated my experience with the church. In what I perceived and read, I saw everything painted in this manner: do this, don't do that, hold your hands this way, wear this and not that etc etc. Where is God in that? Besides every one kept saying all other faiths are wrong, that irritated me. Eventually I used my kids' misbehavior and my husband's sighs in church as excuses to give up on trying.

As a result, some time later, what greatly attracted me to the Protestant faith was seeing the fruit of the love for God in their lives and their sincerely I didn't see in the Orthodox people (in my perception of it). I was suggested some evangelical books that made so much sense to me. One particular thing that struck me was a realization that Christ was the savior of the world because I somehow totally missed that in the Orthodox church (don't ask me how) and that I, althought claimed to be a Christian, did not live like one and that it needed to change. Eventually as I soaked up everything I could get my hands on in the Protestant literature, I started seeing many holes that couldn't be filled no matter how you stretch it. Who knows how long this would go on if it hadn't been for us having a new baby and the necessity to firmly decide in what faith she'd be baptized and raised. I suddenly felt a ton of resposibility weighing on me to make an informed decision. So off we went to look into various Christian faiths and to visit churches. It was painful to learn that I had been blind and wrong about many things, particularly the role of Tradition. For some period of time, my husband and I were stuck between Catholicism and Orthodoxy - both have very good arguments and we spoke with wonderful priests from both. Eventually my husband said something that made great sense: we cannot use our limited minds to descern between the two. I must admit, I really didn't want to be Orthodox again and neither did I want to be Catholic, so I prayed that if it's God's will, I will submit to whichever He leads me to, with His help. Gradually I realized somehow that God has always been in the Orthodox church and that I had simply been blind to it. My husband followed this by wanting to be a proper spiritual leader to his inevitably Orthodox family.

While I regret detouring away from the Church, I see it as a lesson in humility. It seems we learn the most when we admit we are wrong... It's so hard to do. To admit I am wrong, I am a sinner and I fail all the time. But the journey to Christ always seems to be paved in humility, of which we still have very little. We also developed great love for people of the other Christian faiths we came to know so closely. While we may disagree with their theology, we no longer question their sincerity or look down on them in any way. And we found that all that is true and beautiful in Protestanism and Catholicism is still true and beautiful but in a fuller form in Orthodoxy. This is just a beginning of a journey.

#58 Herman Blaydoe

Herman Blaydoe

    Moderator

  • Moderators
  • 4,157 posts
  • Orthodox Christian Member

Posted 19 January 2007 - 06:21 PM

This is a very moving and inspiring story! Thank you for sharing it. Welcome home. God be with you and your family!

Your servant,
Herman

#59 John Charmley

John Charmley

    Very Frequent Poster

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,101 posts
  • Guest from Another Religious Tradition

Posted 20 January 2007 - 12:02 AM

While I regret detouring away from the Church, I see it as a lesson in humility. It seems we learn the most when we admit we are wrong... It's so hard to do. To admit I am wrong, I am a sinner and I fail all the time. But the journey to Christ always seems to be paved in humility, of which we still have very little. We also developed great love for people of the other Christian faiths we came to know so closely. While we may disagree with their theology, we no longer question their sincerity or look down on them in any way. And we found that all that is true and beautiful in Protestanism and Catholicism is still true and beautiful but in a fuller form in Orthodoxy. This is just a beginning of a journey.


Dear Maria,

This is a beautiful and moving post. What regret can there be for such a journey and such lessons learned? We are all sinners, and we all fail all the time, but your senitments expressed here breathe what St, John says in 1 John 4:11-12:

11 Beloved, if God so loved us, we also ought to love one another.
12 No one has seen God at any time. If we love one another, God abides in us, and His love has been perfected in us.


Your penultimate sentence is a perfect example of such love, and we are all in your debt for sharing it with us.

In Christ,

John

#60 Stephanos Nikopolis

Stephanos Nikopolis

    Junior Poster

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 11 posts

Posted 22 January 2007 - 10:25 AM

Hello All,

Though from a Roman Catholic background, I learned of to Orthodoxy and became Orthodox mainly through study of history while living the first fifteen years of my adult life mostly in Mediterranean Europe.

I earned the equivalent of a masters degree in Byzantine History from the University of Ioannina in Epiros, Greece, during which time, in 2002, I was chrysmated into the Orthodox Church by the bishop and fathers of the monastic community of Nikopolis/Preveza.

A researcher, writer, economist and translator, for a living I translate mostly economic and financial texts from Spanish, Portuguese, French, Italian and possibly Greek into English.

I am also an avid writer and I maintain two blogsites, one on purely economics, the other containing Orthodox-inspired theological aphorisms and essays, influenced by one who is an economist, among other things, mostly related to the Orthodox Tradition.

I don't know if I am allowed to broadcast the URL (http://stephanosofepiros.wordpress.com/), but if not I could send a private message to anyone interested.

In any case, I hope to come into contact with fellow Orthodox around the world, especially those interested in theology, the akolouthia, the New Testament, Patristics, iconographic art, and a bit of history, not necessarily in that order.

I currently live with my wife in the US and we are expecting our first child. I ask for your prayers for a healthy mother and healthy baby, God willing; at the moment we seem to be on a good path.

We hope to be able to visit the Orthodox community in Preveza/Nikopolis this year and in the coming years, among other places, God willing.

The blessings of Christ to all!




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users