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Monastery of St Gregory Palamas, Ohio


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#1 David Naess

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Posted 26 October 2007 - 03:26 AM

I was talking to my priest today about monasteries and he directed me to consider:

The Monastery of St. Gregory Palamas
in Perrysville, Ohio.

They have a site:
http://sgpm.goarch.org/Monastery/


but they don't say very much about what sort of work they do.

Can anybody fill me in?

I have sent an initial inquiry to the abbot.

#2 Rick H.

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Posted 26 October 2007 - 11:29 AM

Dear Dave,

Thanks for starting this thread. I would like to learn more about this monastery too.

It looks like it is about 2 hours away from my house. If you hear back from them, possibly you could share what you have found out about opportunities for visiting or staying for a day or two?

In Christ,
Rick

#3 Herman Blaydoe

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Posted 26 October 2007 - 11:43 AM

They work out their salvation.

A young seeker approached an elderly monk asking: "What do you do in the monastery?" The old monk replied: "Oh, well, we fall down and we get up. We fall back down again and we get back up. And then we fall down and get up again."

#4 David Naess

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Posted 26 October 2007 - 01:14 PM

They work out their salvation.

A young seeker approached an elderly monk asking: "What do you do in the monastery?" The old monk replied: "Oh, well, we fall down and we get up. We fall back down again and we get back up. And then we fall down and get up again."

Howdy Herman!

Awww -- c'mon...

You know what I mean.

What do they do to generate income for the monestary!

Guess visual comedy is just about all you can do if you are tonsured into silence, eh? ;->
...'course I'm a different case cuz I know sign language!

Dave

#5 Herman Blaydoe

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Posted 26 October 2007 - 01:29 PM

Well, I believe they strive to be as self-sufficient as possible, with gardens and such. They make and sell candles, and accept donations.

Beyond that, while some Orthodox monasteries engage is specific activities, like New Skete which trains guide dogs, or Mercy House which serves the New York inner city, most simply engage in whatever activity helps keep the body occupied without interferring with inner prayer, and praying the hours. They seek the company of God and sometimes allow us non-monastics to share in their experience. For the Orthodox, monasteries are not generally money-making or social service endeavors. If I misspeak, I look forward to correction.

Herman

#6 Nina

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Posted 26 October 2007 - 06:29 PM

For the Orthodox, monasteries are not generally money-making or social service endeavors.

Herman


Yes, you are right. And they are always there in case we need prayer. And what prayer that is!

#7 David Naess

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Posted 28 October 2007 - 03:04 AM

I am taking a shot in the dark here, but it looks like they do a lot of work in providing liturgical material to churches and choirs.

Hmmm... here I've been telling myself:

"If you want to learn the theology, study the liturgical cycles!"

#8 George Vatsis

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Posted 16 November 2007 - 07:41 PM

Hi all -

I am new here, this is my first post actually. Just to chime in on the St. Gregory Palamas monestary, the place is beautiful, and the monks there do make candles. You may know monk Seraphim Dedes, an Athonite monk, used to reside there as Abbot. He has translated all of the 8 tones from Byzantine Greek into English. CDs are available from the monastery website, and I have to admit he sings the hymns beautifully. I believe they are planning on having livestock on the land when more monks are present.

In Christ,

George

#9 David Naess

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Posted 17 November 2007 - 02:36 AM

Howdy George!

Thank you very much!

That indicates that they have plans for future expansion.

p.s.: WELCOME!

#10 Moses Ibrahim

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Posted 17 January 2008 - 05:17 AM

Hieromonk Alexei Young the spiritual child of Fr. Seraphim Rose is a monk in that monastery. I know there are about 3-4 monks there. Thats all for now.

#11 Justin Farr

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Posted 25 January 2008 - 02:48 AM

This is where I hope to be a monk someday. My SF, Fr. Ambrose, resides there!

He told me that the websites focuses more on the written word. However, I really enjoy pictures and I found these a few months ago taken of the monastery. :)



#12 David Naess

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Posted 08 March 2008 - 03:14 PM

Howdy Justin!

Thanks for that link!

#13 George Vatsis

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Posted 10 March 2008 - 04:47 PM

Justin -

How is the health of Fr. Ambrose? God be with him.

On another note, the latest Talanton, a monthly brochure from the monastery, states that there are 8 monks residing there.

George

#14 Eric Peterson

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Posted 10 March 2008 - 06:17 PM

I'd like to visit that monastery, too. That one and Holy Cross Hermitage in WV seem to me to be good monasteries, though I haven't visited either one yet.

#15 Guest_Augustine Martin

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Posted 12 June 2012 - 05:35 PM

This post hasn't been updated in four years. Any new information? I'm interested in that monastery.

#16 George Vatsis

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Posted 22 June 2012 - 02:12 PM

Hi John,

Fr. Joseph was officially tonsured as Abbott in March. Also a large guest house was completed in the last year, allowing for visitors including families to stay overnight at the Monastery. If you are able, you should go and visit.

#17 Guest_Augustine Martin

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Posted 29 August 2012 - 08:55 AM

I visited there in July. It seems to be a healthy place, although it's not my rhythm. The monks are very impersonal. They will "banish" you to the guest house, so bring a friend to talk to. Also, the services can be very dry. But it's worth a visit. The abbot and the other priest seem to have a lot of wisdom.

#18 Rick H.

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Posted 29 August 2012 - 11:04 AM

I visited there in July. It seems to be a healthy place, although it's not my rhythm. The monks are very impersonal. They will "banish" you to the guest house, so bring a friend to talk to. Also, the services can be very dry. But it's worth a visit. The abbot and the other priest seem to have a lot of wisdom.



I agree with you John there is a lot of wisdom at St Gregory Palamas. My daughter visits there frequently, I have been there once. I am guessing that Fr. Michael was not there the day you were there. He is very engaging and has much depth, and also one of the best senses of humor I have ever seen. I remember the day he came to sit with me outside in the 'park' area. I was knocked off my guard and wasn't sure if he was a real monk or a stand up comedian in a monk suit (I didn't expect to laugh so much at a monastery) . . . he is pretty cool, and as I found out through the day he is deep and very 'insightful' with much to offer, he is at the same time disarming and seeming able to see inside of you. They invited us up to the main house and I spent about 1.5 hours there talking more and found the whole place very interesting. I do know what you mean though, I think, because when I first got there I thought some of the other monks really kept to themselves (always staring at the ground when they walked or did anything), and I found myself starting to mirror them . . . but that changed as I made the effort to engage with them. For example, I asked one stone faced tough looking monk with dark hair and a dark beard where he was from. He said "Toledo." I said "Toledo! you've got to be kidding me, to me you look like you just got off the boat from Greece yesterday." I told him, "Well, you've got the look 'anyway." And, then he laughed and became like a regular guy and started talking and he wasn't stone faced anymore with me for the rest of the day.

St. Gregory Palamas is not like Disney Land, and I don't think we rate monasteries like we do hotels, but I give them 5 stars. When I was there I saw the biggest pile of firewood I have ever seen and I found out the monks had cut and split it all by hand. Maybe they were tired when you were there for some reason.

I wonder how their vegetable garden looked when you were there with the drought. They get a lot of food from their place and I know they have been trying to get some grapes established but as most other places this has been a terrible year for those of us like to grow and harvest things.

#19 Fr. Ambrose

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Posted 29 August 2012 - 03:42 PM

Hieromonk Alexei Young the spiritual child of Fr. Seraphim Rose is a monk in that monastery. I know there are about 3-4 monks there. Thats all for now.


I just came across this message. I, Hieromonk Alexey Young, was tonsured to the Great Schema and am now Hiero-schemamonk Ambrose. Although still a member of the brotherhood at St. Gregory's, I serve as chaplian for the nuns at the Skete of the Entrance of the Theotokos, about a mile down the road from St. Gregory's. --Fr. Ambrose

#20 Zosimas Sidway

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Posted 02 September 2012 - 09:51 PM

I visited there in July. It seems to be a healthy place, although it's not my rhythm. The monks are very impersonal. They will "banish" you to the guest house, so bring a friend to talk to. Also, the services can be very dry. But it's worth a visit. The abbot and the other priest seem to have a lot of wisdom.


I have been visiting at St Gregory's since April 2005, and can affirm it is quite healthy. Their rhythm is also quite rigorous, as you can see from their schedule. If you are able to stay for more than an overnight, you would certainly be welcomed to help with chores (and would be expected to if you stay more than three days). The informal 'motto' of the monastery is posted here and there in the various buildings: "Prayer - Work - Silence." This is a reminder for the brothers, as well as for us visitors. The monks are extremely quiet, but as Rick H. experienced with Fr Tryphon from Toledo, they have their own engaging personalities.

Rick H, you'll be glad to know the vegetable garden is doing well. I happened to notice the grape vines seemed to have grown considerably also.

Some friends of mine from my parish in Cincinnati made a pilgrimage to St Gregory's just this past January, which you can read about here (photo slide show included): http://www.christthe...onasteries.html




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