Jump to content


Photo
* - - - - 1 votes

Planning a road trip to various monasteries in the USA


  • Please log in to reply
32 replies to this topic

#21 Monica Zugravu

Monica Zugravu

    Junior Poster

  • Members
  • 1 posts

Posted 04 August 2008 - 05:01 PM

In a year and a few months when I turn 18, I want to take a road trip. I was thinking I could take 2-4 weeks during the summer, save money, and go on a road trip all over the USA and say a day or two at various monasteries. Is this feasible?

Thanks! :)

Hello Justin!

I suggest going to Holy Protection Monastery. The service is in Greek, but they can offer you a book with the service in both English and Greek. The sisters there are very nice and you can take your time to pray or read books from the library. I attached some photos with the monastery and with one of the guest rooms.

#22 Fr Dn Theodoros

Fr Dn Theodoros

    Regular Poster

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 16 posts

Posted 23 August 2008 - 10:54 PM

My wife and I just had one of the best vacations ever. We drove to Erie PA from Toronto and (at the last minute) decided to visit a few monasteries in the general vicinity. We first visited The Nativity of the Theotokos Monastery in Saxonberg. One word - PARADISE! The following day, off we went to St. Gregory Palamas in Hayesville, Ohio. We said the Paraklisis to the Virgin and had lunch. Afterwards we spent some time chating with both Fr. Joseph (Hegumen) and Fr. Michael. Came back with a lot of spiritual guidance. Finally we visited the Monastery of the Transfiguration in Ellwood City, PA. We went early in the morning for Matins and Divine Liturgy. The service was just angelic! After breakfast, we took a walk around the grounds. Shear beauty! After lunch, Mother Haritina chatted with us about Toronto (her former hometown).

We left PA and Ohio spiritually rejuvenated!

If you can, I would highly recommend this type of mini-pilgrimage to anyone!

Only advice, CALL the monasteries before you go. We called the day before and asked if we would be able to visit. Each one was more that happy to have us there for a visit. They each invited us to stay for lunch and allowed us time to visit the grounds.

In Christ,

Theodoros

#23 John Mitchell

John Mitchell

    Regular Poster

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 53 posts

Posted 22 June 2011 - 04:34 PM

I adore Tennessee! It is my opinion that the South is one of the best places a body could ever live! :D The monastery I want to join has to be in the South. ;) Or Alaska. Cause I like the cold. :P

You see, I want to be a monk. So I figured a typical woohoo I am out of high school and am an official adult road trip would be a perfect time to go to different monasteries to see if A) Monasticism is for me and B) Which I would want to join. My SF, Fr. Ambrose, is in Ohio at St. Gregory Palamas monastery.

It's great to know that someone who posts here put up that amazing website! :D I go there all the time to go to different monastery websites so I can daydream about what it will be like! ^_^;


I was born a Tennesseean. It is my plan to visit monasteries in the south. There arent any near me. except in Georgia and Florida I will have to pray for the ways and means to get to places in the mountains where busses dont go in order to visit more than one in a single trip. Your prayers for me would be appreciated as well.

#24 Alice

Alice

    Very Frequent Poster

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 673 posts
  • Orthodox Christian Member

Posted 02 October 2012 - 01:39 PM

Hello Justin!

I suggest going to Holy Protection Monastery. The service is in Greek, but they can offer you a book with the service in both English and Greek. The sisters there are very nice and you can take your time to pray or read books from the library. I attached some photos with the monastery and with one of the guest rooms.


My husband and I went there yesterday for their Feastday. I suggest to anyone within driving distance of a Greek monastery, to try to visit them on their feastdays. It reminds me of being in a town or island in Greece...beautiful services, lots of people, hospitality, a sit down meal under a tent, coffee, cookies, etc. You will be fed both bodily and spiritually, and there are always many delicious treats and other goods (books, icons, prayer ropes, etc.) to buy to take home. We bought a piece of the most delicious 'bougatza' (cream filled 'pita' topped by confectioner's sugar) for the ride home, and it was one of the best I have ever had--even in Athens they were not this good!

The nuns make amazing artisan breads for sale on the weekends, and their tsoureki (sweet holiday bread) is the best I have had in this country. In fact, our parish ordered from them this year for our annual post-Resurrection service meal, and everyone agreed that this year's were the best. (The others were from commercial Greek bakeries)..The nuns use only the finest ingredients, and as one mother said when I asked her how it is that their meals are always so tasty, "a sprinkling of seasoning from the Panaghia"! :-)

#25 Ryan

Ryan

    Very Frequent Poster

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 837 posts
  • Orthodox Christian Member

Posted 02 October 2012 - 07:31 PM

My husband and I went there yesterday for their Feastday.


I was there too! I should have gotten some of that bougatza... I just didn't know what was what.

#26 Alice

Alice

    Very Frequent Poster

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 673 posts
  • Orthodox Christian Member

Posted 02 October 2012 - 10:54 PM

I was there too! I should have gotten some of that bougatza... I just didn't know what was what.



Dear Ryan,

How I wished that I knew before hand! I would have loved to have introduced you to the world of Greek delicacies! :-)

God willing, 'kai tou hronou' (and next year)!

In Christ,
Alice

#27 David Naess

David Naess

    Regular Poster

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 93 posts

Posted 05 October 2012 - 03:23 AM

Two monasteries in the northeast that I would definately recommend:

New Skete in Cambridge, NY (between Albany and Saratoga, about 2 miles from the Vermont state line.)

St. Tikhon's in South Canaan, PA (just NE of Scranton.) The oldest Orthodox Monastery in the lower 48 states.

Both of the above are OCA monasteries.
The Liturgy at New Skete will knock your socks off! (They do "The Praises" in cascading 6 part harmony.)

There is a lot of controversy over New Skete, but I believe that everybody who wants to see the full spectrum of monastic life should visit New Skete (if for no other reason than to see their dogs and taste their cheesecake!)

Edited by David Naess, 05 October 2012 - 03:41 AM.


#28 David Naess

David Naess

    Regular Poster

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 93 posts

Posted 05 October 2012 - 03:34 AM

re: Confession at a monastery.

You will want to give this some long, hard thought.
A chanter at my church confessed at a monastery one time...
He was given a pennance of not being allowed to take communion for 3 years!

Once his priest found out about it, the priest had no choice but to carry out the order.

I was told that I should start every intimate discussion with an Igumen with: "This is not a confession."

If you would like to confess at a monastery, Fr. Daniel at St. Tikhon's is an amazing confessor...

Fr. Daniel is a blind priest who confesses non-monastics. He has the gift of "the sight" and, in my case anyway, has (on more than one occasion) told me everything that was on my confession list -- and then some before I said a word!

Edited by David Naess, 05 October 2012 - 03:55 AM.


#29 Alice

Alice

    Very Frequent Poster

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 673 posts
  • Orthodox Christian Member

Posted 05 October 2012 - 12:43 PM

re: Confession at a monastery.

You will want to give this some long, hard thought.
A chanter at my church confessed at a monastery one time...
He was given a pennance of not being allowed to take communion for 3 years!

Once his priest found out about it, the priest had no choice but to carry out the order.

I was told that I should start every intimate discussion with an Igumen with: "This is not a confession."

If you would like to confess at a monastery, Fr. Daniel at St. Tikhon's is an amazing confessor...

Fr. Daniel is a blind priest who confesses non-monastics. He has the gift of "the sight" and, in my case anyway, has (on more than one occasion) told me everything that was on my confession list -- and then some before I said a word!


The canons give long penances for grave sins, and monastic confessors do follow that. One should probably not seek out a spiritual Father from a monastery if one is not yet ready for that level of Orthodoxy.

Thank you for sharing about Father Daniel of St. Tikhon's. Does he speak English well?

Two monasteries in the northeast that I would definately recommend:

New Skete in Cambridge, NY (between Albany and Saratoga, about 2 miles from the Vermont state line.)

St. Tikhon's in South Canaan, PA (just NE of Scranton.) The oldest Orthodox Monastery in the lower 48 states.

Both of the above are OCA monasteries.
The Liturgy at New Skete will knock your socks off! (They do "The Praises" in cascading 6 part harmony.)

There is a lot of controversy over New Skete, but I believe that everybody who wants to see the full spectrum of monastic life should visit New Skete (if for no other reason than to see their dogs and taste their cheesecake!)


Many years ago we were in Vermont, and my husband went to Liturgy in the morning at New Skete. He said it was different, but nice.

The Inn keeper where we stayed in Vermont-- a Greek Jew-- was the one who actually told us about the monastery (!) and he also supported them by buying their cheesecakes for the inn... and I must say that they were AMAZING!! :-)

#30 Mark Harris

Mark Harris

    Regular Poster

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 125 posts
  • Orthodox Christian Member

Posted 05 October 2012 - 09:49 PM

this is a trip I will be making in 2013 http://www.romanianm...ina-monasteries

#31 Alice

Alice

    Very Frequent Poster

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 673 posts
  • Orthodox Christian Member

Posted 05 October 2012 - 10:49 PM

Sounds wonderful! Have you been to Romania before?

#32 Mark Harris

Mark Harris

    Regular Poster

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 125 posts
  • Orthodox Christian Member

Posted 06 October 2012 - 08:48 PM

Hi Alice, yes I have been many times , my wife is also from Romania and we were there for a holiday just this summer. We visited the Orthodox Cathedral in Iasi where Saint Maria Paraschiva rests.

#33 David Naess

David Naess

    Regular Poster

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 93 posts

Posted 08 October 2012 - 04:04 AM

The canons give long penances for grave sins, and monastic confessors do follow that. One should probably not seek out a spiritual Father from a monastery if one is not yet ready for that level of Orthodoxy.

Thank you for sharing about Father Daniel of St. Tikhon's. Does he speak English well?



Many years ago we were in Vermont, and my husband went to Liturgy in the morning at New Skete. He said it was different, but nice.

The Inn keeper where we stayed in Vermont-- a Greek Jew-- was the one who actually told us about the monastery (!) and he also supported them by buying their cheesecakes for the inn... and I must say that they were AMAZING!! :-)


Fr. Daniel appears to be a home grown American. Either that or he doesn't have a trace of an accent.




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users