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#1 Mary

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Posted 08 February 2008 - 02:48 PM

It wasn't as hard as I thought. It was actually pretty simple. I decided to just cut out the oil from the vegan recipes I've been experimenting with, to see what would happen! And I was as surprised as everyone else that it tasted so good. =)

Leek Soup:

This has been our all time favorite vegetable soup. Add some fresh baked rolls to it, and it's heavenly! Andrew (my 9-yr old) said one day: "Mom, how is it that vegetables can taste so good?" And I told him it was God's gift to us, because I'm not a great cook. Or maybe it's because St Euphrosinos has been cooking instead of me! =)

2 14.5oz cans of diced tomatoes (you can, of course, use fresh tomatoes, or one large can of 25oz - 28oz).
1 large onion, choppped
4 cloves of garlic, pressed (or more if you feel a particular desire for more)
2 Tbs oil ( - which it really doesn't need!!!)
6 Large Leeks, white part, chopped. (I use some of the green parts too - the softer, light green parts).
1 large celery stalk, chopped
2 medium carrots, chopped
6 cups of vegetable broth
1/4 cup of cabbage, chopped (for some reason, the red cabbage adds more flavor to this soup, than the green)
1/2 tsp basil
1/2 tsp thyme
Salt & Pepper to taste

I sometimes add a few potatoes, chopped. And this last time, I added 2 cups of left over Garlic Rosemary Lentils that I had. We also add this soup to our store bought spaghetti sauce. It makes a lot, so there's plenty to experiment with.

Regular directions: (with oil) - In a large soup pot, heat oil and cook onion till nearly translucent. Add the garlic. Saute a few more minutes. Add the remaining vegetables and saute some more. Add seasonings. Put all the sauted veggies in a crock pot, add tomatoes and broth. Cook on low for 7-9 hours or on high for 4-6 hours.

I like the use the pressure cooker - just pressure for 4 minutes under 10lbs of pressure. But this last time, I was talking to mom on the phone, and forgot to put the top on my pressure cooker, and it all boiled to perfection anyway! Except, I can't say how long it took, because I was busy talking...

When cooking without the oil - it's much easier, just dump everything into the pot as your chopping each ingredient, add the liquids, cook till everything is done. If you're talking to your mother, or are on Monachos, cook it on medium or low heat, and don't turn your stove on full blast. =)

#2 Mary

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Posted 08 February 2008 - 02:50 PM

Garlic Rosemary Lentil

This one has no oil either, and it's the one that I had too much of, that I added to the leek soup. It's really good. I think I'll add some to our spaghetti sauce next, and see what happens.

5 cups water
3 cups chopped onion
2 cans (14.5oz each) of white beans
1 cup diced carrots
1 tsp dried rosemary, crushed - seems like a lot, but it turned out good
3/4 tsp sage (I only had ground sage, but it worked)
1 lb. dried lentils, sorted and rinsed
2 gloves garlic, pressed
1/2 bay leaf
salt and pepper to taste

Combine everything in a slow cooker (crock pot) and cook on low for 6 hrs or on high for 3 hrs. In a pressure cooker - cook for about 5 minutes.

Serve with salad and bread.

First time I made it, it was soupy, because I made it just before we ate. This last time, I made it early in the day. When I opened my pressure cooker in the evening, all the liquid had been absorbed! It looked like we could use it for filling tortillas, which we'll try next time. But, since it was so much drier, it was hard to eat it with bread. But, just with romaine leaves, it was great.

#3 Mary

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Posted 08 February 2008 - 02:56 PM

2 cups diced onions
2 cups diced green peppers
1 cup diced celery
2 garlic cloves minced
1 tbs oil (Optional)
4 cups diced fresh tomatoes
2 cups sliced fresh mushrooms
1 can (15oz) tomato sauce
2 cans (6oz each) tomato paste
1/2 cup burgundy wine or water
2 Tbs sugar
1 Tbs red wine vinegar or cider vinegar
2 Tbs minced fresh basil (or 2 tsp dried)
2 Tbs minced fresh oregano (1 tsp dried)
1 tbs minced fresh parsley (1tsp dried)
1 tsp dried rosemary
1 bay leaf
1 tsp salt
1/4 tsp pepper

If using oil, saute onions, peppers, celery and garlic first, then add everything else, bring to a boil. Reduce heat, cover and simmer for 1 1/2 hrs. Discard Bay leaf.

I'll let you know what happens when I try this next, with 2 cups of my Garlic Rosemary Lentil added to it! =)

#4 Mary

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Posted 08 February 2008 - 03:02 PM

Much less complicated than the previous one. A bit soupier. I think I'll add a can of tomato paste to it next. I liked it with bread too, instead of spaghetti. But then, I love bread, anytime.

3 large carrots, finely chopped
2 large onions, chopped
6 garlic cloves, minced
15 medium tomatoes (about 6 lbs) - chopped
1/3 cup chopped fresh basil
3 Tbs chopped fresh Oregano (or 1 Tbs dried)
11/2 tsp salt
1/4 tst pepper

Bring everything to a boil, cover and simmer on low heat for 1 to 11/2 hrs or until thickened. ( I know I simmered it for over and hour, but it didn't thicken in that time - a can of tomato paste is much cheaper than 3 hrs of gas, I'm sure!)

#5 Mary

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Posted 08 February 2008 - 03:18 PM

None of my recipes are complete without bread! The only way I can get my kids to not complain about experimental food is if there's fresh bread on the side. That way, if they really, really don't like the meal, they can always eat bread. I make my own. Tastes much better.

2-3 cups of white flour
1 cup of oatmeal mix*
21/2 tsp of yeast
1 Tbs of honey (you can use sugar. I like to use Honey so I can think of St John the Baptist...)
1 Tbs oil - I haven't yet, tried it without oil. But my guess is, the oatmeal, makes it so soft, so it won't really miss the oil... I'll let you know. I make this bread at least once a week, so either today or tomorrow, I'll find out what it's like without oil.
1 cup of warm water
1 tsp salt

Dissolve the honey in the warm water, then add the yeast to it.
Whisk in 1 cup of white flour.
Let it rise for an hour. You'll have a spongy mass after an hour.

(normally, the bread recipes tell you to mix in all the flour, before you let it rise. But I found that, allowing it to rise before all the flour is added, lessens the amount of rising time after the flour is added, which keeps your bread dough softer. Normally, it forms a dry outer crust while rising - unless you use other methods to keep it moist. This was much easier.)

Add the salt, the cup of oatmeal mix, and then however much white flour you need to make the dough stop being sticky.

Shape into rolls. Place on a lightly greased pan.

Bake for 350F for 15 minutes or until golden brown.

This, folks, is the only recipe that's entirely my own. All others are from other sources, and if you'd like to know, I can tell you where I got them from.

*The Oatmeal Mix

This is actually a breakfast concoction of various ingredients, that I grind up to add to my bread, because the kids don't like it as breakfast! I like it as breakfast, but it's better as bread.

Dr Bruce Milliman's Immune Support Breakfast (yes, it's true, eat it two or 3 times a week, and you'll improve your health).

4 cups rolled oats or barley
2 cups oat bran (I like to use one cup of oat bran and one cup of wheat germ)
1 cup sunflower seeds (raw) - ground
1 cup raw, unsalted nuts - I've found almonds to be the best
1 cup lecithin granules (not the liquid!)
1 cup flaxseed, ground

Mix everything up together. It has to be stored in the fridge because of the lecithin and flaxseed. The flaxseed has to be ground, otherwise, you wont' be able to digest it. It's also not as easy to chew as the sunflower seeds - which you may leave whole, if you wish.

One serving is 1/2 cup of the dry mixture, with 1/2 cup of liquid - soy milk, rice milk, nutmilk, apple juice, or regular milk. I think it tastes best with soy milk. Or you could just use water. Let everything soak for awhile before you eat it. I didn't like it heated up.

It's very filling. I can't eat a whole 1/2 cup.

This is what I grind up, really fine, to add to my bread, pancakes and waffles, and anything else that requires flour, except, of course, for brownies! I use 1 cup of this mixture to two cups of white flour. You can use more or less, as your taste buds dictate.

Let me know if you try it out. =)

In Christ,
mary

#6 Nina

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Posted 08 February 2008 - 03:20 PM

Wow thanks Mary! And now my recipe: Lamb and rice without oil - (you just use the fat of the lamb instead) - I am kidding. :P


Super-quick No-oil Lenten Cookies
(Tried and delicious)

1 cup raising
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon baking powder
1 teaspoon baking soda
1 cup sugar
1/2 cup tahini
1 cup applesauce
2 cups flour
1 teaspoon cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon nutmeg

Mix sugar and tahini. Add in the apple sauce. Add in the remaining ingredients. Drop by spoonfuls onto greased cookie sheets. Bake in 350 oven for 8-10 minutes. (Although I baked the cookies for a little longer just check on them and decide for yourself). This recipe is from Food for Paradise, p.118

Also keep in mind that tahini and orange juice are fantastic for baking Lenten without oil. Also tahini is very good for other super quick recipes: Link

#7 Mary

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Posted 08 February 2008 - 04:24 PM

Here's a VERY useful site, with a list of all products in the stores that are Vegan!!! That'll save a ton of time, and worry about reading labels!!

http://www.peta.org/accidentallyVegan/

Sorry, I think it's American.

#8 Nina

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Posted 08 February 2008 - 04:38 PM

What about in the case when the ingredient's label reads: Processed in facilities which process eggs, milk etc.? What can we do?

#9 Mary

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Posted 08 February 2008 - 04:53 PM

What about in the case when the ingredient's label reads: Processed in facilities which process eggs, milk etc.? What can we do?


Well - if you think about it, our homes are like that. It just means that products containing those indgredients are also made in the same facilities. If you have kids, there's always going to be milk in the fridge - but it doesn't have to find it's way into your coffee! =)

That warning on the labels is more for people with really severe allergies. I've heard of kids going into shock, even though they were eating the right things, but their food was prepared in the same place as other foods are prepared, that contain the things that they're allergic to.

For example, we make nut rolls twice a year, and we make some with nuts and others without. We use a separate table for making the rolls with nuts, and also, we don't use the same rolling pins! Can never tell who might roll over and die because we used the same rolling pin on a nut roll and a nut-free roll!!!

#10 Nina

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Posted 08 February 2008 - 05:26 PM

Well - if you think about it, our homes are like that. It just means that products containing those indgredients are also made in the same facilities. If you have kids, there's always going to be milk in the fridge - but it doesn't have to find it's way into your coffee! =)


Really??? :( I do not drink coffee (and you can have coffee without milk) but if there is milk in the fridge I want smoothies, or hot chocolate.

That warning on the labels is more for people with really severe allergies. I've heard of kids going into shock, even though they were eating the right things, but their food was prepared in the same place as other foods are prepared, that contain the things that they're allergic to.

That is my question. Will that break the fast for us if the product is vegan itself? I can always ask my spiritual father though because lately I see this a lot in labels. But overall I get the idea of what happens. :P

#11 Sieglinde McGinnis

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Posted 08 February 2008 - 07:02 PM

Wow, Mary, that Leek soup recipe looks delicious.....I think we'll try it next week! I'm casting about frantically for yummy-but-legal things to put on the table; I'm not doing too badly but the children are about to decide that a culinary revolt is in order. I must make a good list and go to the grocery store!

#12 Mary

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Posted 08 February 2008 - 07:23 PM

Wow, Mary, that Leek soup recipe looks delicious.....I think we'll try it next week! I'm casting about frantically for yummy-but-legal things to put on the table; I'm not doing too badly but the children are about to decide that a culinary revolt is in order. I must make a good list and go to the grocery store!



How old are your kids, Sieglinde? Mine are 9 & 6. Whenever I try new things, the deal is, they're tasters/testers. They get to rate the recipe. All recipes that get 4 or 5 stars are repeated (not right away!) - and those that get 3 stars are only used again, if a 4 or 5 star isn't available, and those that get 2 and under are out of our lives forever. And of course, the bread on the side helps, if the recipe happens to get 0 stars. =)

I still haven't worked out a good compromise when the grown ups really really like a recipe, and the kids absolutely hate it... (kinks in my system...)

Also, I don't expect the kids to fast as strictly as I do, so they're allowed to sprinkle a bit of cheese on their spaghetti, a little butter on their bread... I was thrilled to find that my little girl couldn't tell that the fake soy cream cheese, wasn't the real thing. (I usually don't tell them what they're eating unless they make a disgusting face and figure out for themselves that it's something unusual...) =) And, of course, they still drink milk. They also eat lunch at school, with is totally non-lenten. But when they're older, and wish to fast all day, I can pack some lenten lunches for them.

I was just looking at this website: www.tofurky.com - there's so much stuff available that's made to look like the real thing! I'm not sure about the taste though. I myself have avoided using too many substitutes - but it might be helpful for the kids. I must experiment with the tempeh thing, though...

Mary

#13 Mary

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Posted 08 February 2008 - 07:27 PM

Really??? :( I do not drink coffee (and you can have coffee without milk) but if there is milk in the fridge I want smoothies, or hot chocolate.


Yes, really. Makes for extra temptation in the house, but what else can we do? I don't mind soy milk in my cereal, but I'd hate to drink a cup of soymilk before I go to bed...

Since I don't use sugar, I need milk in my coffee. Creamer's ok, but it gets to you after a while. I like to drink tea with honey on fast days...

That is my question. Will that break the fast for us if the product is vegan itself? I can always ask my spiritual father though because lately I see this a lot in labels. But overall I get the idea of what happens. :P

Personally, I'd think it's way too obsessive, and the only thing being broken is the 'spirit of the fast' not the dietary aspect of the fast. But, that's my opinion. ;)

In Christ,
mary.

#14 Mary

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Posted 08 February 2008 - 07:43 PM

This is an absolute favorite. Can't believe I forgot it! Took it to church one night, for a lenten potluck, and everyone was sort of quiet in a weird way. We usually don't scrutinize the food people bring, and we know who remembers it's fasting and who doesn't. Then one of the oldest ladies came to me and said very carefully and quietly: "Is that Lenten?" I, of course, wanted to have fun with them, so I hadn't announced that it was lenten. I wanted to see their reactions... lol =) Anyway, they couldn't tell it didn't have any milk/cream in it. The kids love this one.

2 cups cubed russet potatoes (about 2 medium)
1 cup sliced carrots (about 2 medium)
1/2 cup chopped onion
1 can broth (about 2 cups)
1/2 cup water
1/2 tsp salt
1/4 tsp white pepper
1/4 tsp black pepper
2 6.5oz cans whole baby clams, undrained (we also tried frozen clams - which work really good - my husband thought they tasted better than the canned. Use whole clams - we tried bits and pieces once, and it wasn't good at all.)
1 can (15 oz) - white beans, drained

1 can coconut milk (about 11/2 cups to 2 cups)
2 Tbs chopped fresh chives (1 Tbs dry*)
1 tsp paprika


Put everything except the coconut milk, chives and paprika in a large enough pot. Bring to a boil, cover and simmer 15 - 20 min. or until potatoes are tender. Stir in remaining ingrediants, and heat through.

Serve with bread and salad.

*If you're using dry chives, add it in the beginning.

#15 Nina

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Posted 08 February 2008 - 08:20 PM

I was just looking at this website: www.tofurky.com - there's so much stuff available that's made to look like the real thing! I'm not sure about the taste though. I myself have avoided using too many substitutes - but it might be helpful for the kids. I must experiment with the tempeh thing, though...

Mary


Mary,
I tried to make sausages from tofurky and my fiance hated them so I do not prepare them anymore. But maybe your family will like them. I do not know.

I buy the real tempeh, not the one that is prepared, and I cook it and it is great. We love tempeh, and tofu. Both of these are like eating meat, or eggs depending on the recipe.

#16 Mary

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Posted 08 February 2008 - 09:01 PM

I buy the real tempeh, not the one that is prepared, and I cook it and it is great. We love tempeh, and tofu. Both of these are like eating meat, or eggs depending on the recipe.


And what exactly do you mean by 'real tempeh'? A month ago, when I tried to look for it, not even the international supermarket near us had any. So we searched for it online and only found recipes of how to make your own tempeh, which requires some kind of starter, like the kind used for making cheese.

But I did find some in the website I mentioned, and there's a store nearby that carries their products. But that's tempeh that's already prepared, is it not? So, please clarify this tempeh mystery for me!! Thanks! =)

We do use tofu. I like the firm one, to stir fry with veggies and so forth. If you freeze it, then thaw it, and squeeze the liquid out (or put something heavy on top for a while) - it changes the texture of the tofu, so it's a bit more chewy. I liked it, but the kids, and my husband didn't like it. That was 3 against one, so that technique is out of our lives forever, unless I want to just cook for myself, and make every one else cook for themselves... (Hmmm.... that sounds like a really good idea...)

Mary

#17 Nina

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Posted 08 February 2008 - 09:17 PM

:D Real tempeh I said because maybe of the bad experience with the tofurky (since my sweetheart rejected it I got it to heart because he never gives negative feedback to my cooking ;) ). So honestly when I looked in the link you provided and saw this, the tempeh looked kind of pre-made to me. And by real :D I meant the one you buy raw and cook yourself and prepare recipes. Sorry but I never got tempeh from tofurky and so I do not know how it is but it looked pre-made to me like the sausages I tried from them.

You can get tempeh (the real one :P) at Whole Foods. I have noticed they have sales when we have Lent and if you buy several (notice the expiration date) they do not spoil if you refrigerate them. The one they have here is from Lightlife and it can be with wild rice, grains, etc.

I get the tofu there also. Trader Joe's has also very reasonable prices and vegan products. Also with the tofu it depends on the recipe. I think I posted a recipe that is really delicious with tofu and potatoes, at the Lenten recipes thread - (I hope you did not make that and they hated them :O 'cause we love it).

#18 Father David Moser

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Posted 08 February 2008 - 09:20 PM

At this very moment, I am baking oil-less bread

5 pounds of flour
2 Tbsp salt
5 cups of boiling water
1/2 cup of warm water
1 Tbsp flour
1 Tbsp yeast
2 cups of flour

Mix 5 pounds flour and salt together and stir in the boiling water, let sit for a couple of minutes while you mix the sponge.

Mix warm water, yeast and Tbsp of flour and set in a warm place to rise

Return to the dough. Carefully knead the water fully into the dough (there will be "hot spots" of near boiling water hidden in the lump so be careful). Turn the whole thing out on a kneading board when it begins to hold together and continue to knead. When the lump of dough is firm and elastic, return to the bowl, cover and let rest for 10-15 min. After 15 min, make a "bowl" shaped depression in the dough and pour in the sponge. Add 1 c. four to the sponge and knead together into a sticky mass. Fold the sponge into the larger lump of dough and knead together until well mixed and the dough is firm but moist and elastic. Use addl flour to keep the dough from sticking. Return to bowl, cover put in a warm place and let rise 1 hr or until double in bulk.

Punch down the dough, remove it from the bowl and knead briefly to remove air bubbles. Divide dough into 4 smaller lumps. Each lump will make about 20 small prosphora - these can be hand shaped or rolled and cut, stamped and assembled

Put on cookie sheet dusted with flour and cover. let rise for 1/2 hour. Preheat oven to 350. Just before you put the loaves in the oven - pierce each one with a needle (or skewer) 5x in the shape of a cross. Bake for 12-13 min. They should be pale beige (not brown). Put baked prosphora into a towel lined box and cover with a dry towel and then a damp towel and let them come to room temp. Then bag and freeze until needed. It is usually best to bake prosphora at least three days before it will be used.

Fr David Moser

#19 Olga

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Posted 08 February 2008 - 09:22 PM

I can vouch for the wonders of coconut milk (just don't put it in your coffee - errk!), and a lot of Asian food is lenten, too.

#20 Olga

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Posted 09 February 2008 - 02:26 AM

To add to Fr David's post, all prospora should be made with flour, yeast, water, and a little salt. Nothing else, no oil or other shortening. As well as being the simplest and "purest" bread, having any shortening in prosphora will soon earn the wrath of your priest, as the oil content retards the absorption of the wine and water by the bread, and it leaves an oil slick in the chalice which makes cleaning it more difficult. Even greasing the tin or tray is not recommended; simply dust the tin or tray with flour.




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