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#21 Father David Moser

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Posted 09 February 2008 - 03:25 AM

Even greasing the tin or tray is not recommended; simply dust the tin or tray with flour.


One priest I know (who is a master prosphora baker) has a set of pans dedicated to his prosphori. When they are fresh and hot from the oven, he gives them a quick swipe with a block of beeswax and lets them cool so that there is a thin coating of beeswax on the pan. This then keeps the next batch from sticking - and then he just adds a new coat of beeswax each time he bakes.

Fr David Moser

#22 Mary

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Posted 11 February 2008 - 09:04 PM

Tried this without the oil this past Friday. When no groans were heard, I revealed the secret of 'no oil'. And my husband was throughly surprised. "How did you fry it then?" he asked. I fried it in water. LOL Won't my mom keel over and die when I tell her I can fry veggies in water! She loves to fry stuff. =)

3 Tbs veg or safflower oil (or 3 Tbs of water!)
2 carrots chopped
1 small onion, chopped
1 small red bell pepper, chopped
6 oz mushrooms, sliced
16 oz firm tofu juliened - (it didn't retain it's shape after all the stirring around with the veggies, instead, it broke into nice little clumps that looked like, and tasted like hard boiled egg white!)
4 green onions, sliced
1/3 cup soy sauce
2 tsp ginger powder - (wasn't too much, really!)
3 Tbs cornstarch
2 tsp sesame seeds for garnish

Combine soy sauce, ginger and cornstarch, and set aside.
Saute the veggies and tofu in water, in a very hot pan (I use an iron skillet), till the veggies are crisp/tender. Add more water as needed. The add the soy sauce mixture and incorporate until thickened. This is were my tofu broke up into many pieces. I also added a bit more water, as it seemed the sauce was getting too thick.

If you wish, you can add the green onions in the end, as garnish, instead of frying it with everything else. I also had bits of broccoli and cauliflower, which I cut up small, and added to the pile of veggies, and they blended in well. Also, a bit of black pepper, was really good. Seemed to fill it out more, somehow.

Serve over warm rice.

#23 Olga

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Posted 12 February 2008 - 06:54 AM

Many Asian stirfry dishes are quite OK when substituting the oil with water (as Mary did), or with soy sauce, Chinese rice wine (which, despite the name, is salty and undrinkable), or even mild white vinegar.

#24 Mary

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Posted 14 February 2008 - 07:28 PM

I got brave after reading Fr David's post and made my favorite bread yesterday, without oil. It was delicious! Even I couldn't tell it had no oil in it!! Since I don't have a chunk of beeswax to grease my pan, I decided to sprinkle some cornmeal on it. The rolls didn't stick to the pan! Added bonus, so much easier to clean off cornmeal, than burnt grease!!! =)

I was surprised the bread remained as soft and as tasty, as with oil. It made me wonder, how many more things in life, I think I absolutely need, but I really don't; the things that I think make life taste better, but they really don't... I dunno.

My little girl was helping me shape the rolls and we were talking about bread. She's learning to say the Lord's prayer, so I asked her if she remembered the line in the prayer, that says something about bread.

".... give us this day our daily bread..."

My favoritest line of the prayer. But before I could get too thrilled with it, I was reminded of Jesus's words to the Devil, when He was tempted in the desert:

"... man shall not live by bread alone..."

I think I have far too much more than I need. I hope I'll be able to get rid of a lot of extra oil this Lent!

In Christ,
Mary.

#25 Sieglinde McGinnis

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Posted 17 February 2008 - 01:34 PM

Here's a contribution from me - once a month we have an 'international meal' and Saturday night was 'South America menu' night. This is what we had for our side dish:

Oven Baked Plantains

4 ripe plantains (the recipe said yellow ones with black spots were perfect, but my store only had mostly black ones which were fine, I think)

Peel plantains and cut into 1/2 inch slices.

Line a flat baking sheet with parchment paper and preheat oven to 400.

Place plantain slices in a single layer on the baking sheet and bake, turning occasionally, for 15 minutes or so until nicely browned.

If you've never had plantains, which I hadn't, they have a taste sort of like squash but not really. They're a little sweet, in fact. We all enjoyed them, even my picky daughter!

#26 Rick H.

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Posted 17 February 2008 - 01:42 PM

Take one pound of soy beans and boil for 5 mins. then turn off heat and let stand for 1 hour.

Drain beans and run through food processor.

Return beans to pot, add 16 cups of water and simmer for 20 minutes.

Strain soy milk through cloth.

Mix 1 cup soy milk with 3 shots espresso, and some chocolate-caramel-vanilla (enjoy!).

#27 Nina

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Posted 17 February 2008 - 10:56 PM

Rick, is this for real- how the soy milk is made? That's so cool - if yes.

#28 Rick H.

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Posted 17 February 2008 - 11:36 PM

Rick, is this for real- how the soy milk is made? That's so cool - if yes.



Yes Nina, this is for real. I have a large pot that I make 2 gallons of soy milk in every week for my family. I do all kinds of crazy stuff with the by product of the process which is the ground up beans called 'okara' as well.

Cow's milk is better in the lattes, but when I make my chai I like the soy milk there better. Maybe I'll post my world famous chai recipe later? :)

#29 Nina

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Posted 18 February 2008 - 04:08 AM

Yes Nina, this is for real. I have a large pot that I make 2 gallons of soy milk in every week for my family. I do all kinds of crazy stuff with the by product of the process which is the ground up beans called 'okara' as well.

Milk is better in the lattes, but when I make my masala chai I like the soy milk there better. Maybe I'll post my world famous chai recipe later? :)


Wow. Thanks. :D Yes, please do post your world famous masala chai recipe.

#30 Rick H.

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Posted 25 February 2008 - 12:10 AM

Dear Nina,

Without further delay, here's my recipe for Masala Chai/Spice Tea:

6-7 allspice (whole)
1/2 anise star
1 cardamom pod [opened]
10-12 cloves (whole)
2 cinnamon sticks (short sticks about 3")
1/4" ginger root [fresh]
6-7 white peppercorns

1 cup water
4 cups soy milk
2 heaping TBL Ceylon tea [ I use a brand called Red Label Tea--but any is fine, and Darjeeling works well too]
3 packs nutri-sweet or sweeten to taste


1.) Add spices to water, bring to a boil; remove from heat--steep 10 mins.

2.) Add milk, bring just to a boil; remove from heat, add tea and stir gently--steep 5 mins.

3.) Strain into pot, sweeten, and serve


And, this one is a mild one Nina. This is the version my wife likes and it's the one I serve to people who have never had it before. I have another recipe that I like better (and one that I steep longer to make it stronger) which is:

6-7 allspice
1 anise star
1 cardamom pod
3 cinnamon sticks
1/2" ginger root
6-7 black peppercorns

I've come to realize that different folks have their own versions.

If' I am in a hurry, there is a brand called Stash Tea that makes a great chai in a tea bag. I steep this with a little piece of ginger root and add soy milk and usually have a pretty good cup in about 4 mins.

About the homemade soy milk, I really like the Silk brand that Father David mentioned and it is definitely easier to pick it up at the store. I enjoy making soy milk though (becoming one with the soy :) ;) :), and we really go through it at my house so I save quite a bit of money by making it myself. I've actually turned into somewhat of a homemaker in the past year or two. I make homemade yogurt and yogurt cheese too that we use in different ways as well.

Thanks for your interest.

In Christ,
Rick

Edited by Rick H., 25 February 2008 - 12:45 PM.


#31 Mary

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Posted 25 February 2008 - 03:48 AM

Rick, your expertise is much appreciated.

What do you do with the soy beans after you've milked it? (sorry, dont' know what else to call your procedure!) =)

I have a bag of soy beans, that i thought I could grind up and add to my bread, but, boy, is it hard to grind!!! I think I'll just buy soy flour that's already ground up. But I need to know what to do with all my unground beans...

Thanks! =)

Mary

#32 Paul Cowan

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Posted 25 February 2008 - 06:04 AM

Compost them

#33 Rick H.

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Posted 25 February 2008 - 02:33 PM

What do you do with the soy beans after you've milked it? (sorry, dont' know what else to call your procedure!) =)



Mary--Some people on line refer to this as "milking the bean" so while it sounds kind of funny this is kind of what is going on.

But, with the by-product of the process, called okara, there is quite a few different things you can do with this. And, this is another benefit to making soy milk at home. Out of each 2 gal. batch of milk that I make I end up with a large bowl of the okara. This okara can be dried or put in the freezer to be used later, but too be honest with you for me I can't use all of it. When I first started making soy milk I had a freezer full in a short time and as much as I hate to waste it, I do exactly as Paul has said with the excess and compost it.

How you make the milk and how you grind the beans makes a big difference in the texture of the okara. I have a pretty powerful blender and I use the ice blade on it for this. But, what I'm getting at here is if you soak the beans overnight before making the milk and then grind them before putting them into the pot then the texture is very course. But, if you do the quick soak which is boiling them for 5 mins. and then letting them stand in the pot for 1 hour, they are softer and they can be ground up very fine to a texture much like Cream of Wheat. But, there are advantages to having a more course texture or a finer texture depending on what you are using it for. For example, I make bread too :) My wife calls my bread, my 27 grain bread. She is trying to be funny with this, because there are not 27 grains in there. But, I do try to use different whole grains. But, what I am trying to get at here is that if you want amore fluffy sandwich type bread, then the finer and the drier the okara the better. But, if you are making a heavy bread or something like ban nana nut bread or zucchini bread then the course okara is better and it doesn't matter how moist the okara is so much.

I actually like to take the Cream of Wheat style okara (very fine) and sweeten it with brown sugar, and have it for breakfast by itself in a bowl. Or, on the other hand, you can take the course okara and mix it half and half with oatmeal and have something very good too.

There really is a wide variety of things that you can do with the okara. And, again there is a great savings to all of this. It costs me about 1.79 for the beans to make 2 gallons of milk and I also get more okara than I seem to be able to use through the week in meals for this 1.79 as well.

Aside from baking with it, it can go a very long way when you season it and cook a batch of it with ground up vegetables and then use this as you might use ground hamburger or ground sausage in some other dishes. This is a great way to use it! I have containers of this cooked "meat mixture" in my freezer that can be pulled out and used in Mexican dishes (tacos, burritos, etc.), chili, sloppy joes . . . it works really well as a pizza topping too (this cooked mixture looks like hamburger or sausage on a pizza). It makes a great addition to a mushroom and spinach pizza. Any way you use ground meat, you can use this. Italian dishes, whatever . . . although I will share with you that if you use it straight-up with no pre-cooking/seasoning as mentioned above, then it does not absorb tomato sauce very well and does not have a good appearance in dishes with tomato sauce.

I'd like to find a way to make it stick together better so that I can make patties out of the "meat mixture." It's really cool though to make hamburgers with the meat mixture (the people in the Muscatine, Iowa who know about Made-Rite sandwiches or 'loose meat sandwiches' would love this). You can use the loose meat mixture on a hamburger bun and add whatever you normally have to hamburger to it and it's really very good. I like to make thick french fries in the oven, and have my 'okara burger' with a soy milkshake and think I am doing better than a trip to McDonalds healthwise.

But, there are so many things you can do with the okara Mary. The recipes online take some digging through, and some sites are better than others, but possibly there are some ideas there. Another thing I like to do is take the okara and mix it with honey and a flavor like coconut and then toast it on the sheet in the oven. When I want something sweet, I will take a slice of my 27 grain bread put it on a plate with some of my wife's homemade preserves and top it with the toasted coconut okara and eat it with a fork like a piece of cake or a pastry. I'm still blowing the calories on the sugar, but in this 'dessert' there are some whole grains and fibre going on that make it much better than a twinkie--at least some nutritional value in the trade. There really is so much to do with the okara.

But, here is one thing I'd like to pass along in case you want to give it a try. Wait until you have perfected your recipes before trying it on your family. When I first started using it, I served up a few dishes that weren't too good and this made my family not want to try it again. Actually, it was the source of much joking around here for quite a while. I remember when I served Reuben sandwiches with okara instead of corned beef, I was informed that I had not developed "The Okara Reuben" but was serving soybean and sauerkraut sandwiches! :)

Possibly, once one looks at some recipes online with this, then the same one can use his/her imagination and come up with their own uses based on what is being prepared at the present. Not counting the soaking time, it really is a good deal for those who need to watch their dollars. It takes me about 1 hour including clean up time, and when I am done I have about 2 gals. of milk sitting there in the Rubbermaid bottles and a nice supply of okara ready to go for the week.

I'm still trying to understand the nutritional aspects of what the soy bean offers. I think I am seeing some conflicting information as I look at this online. But, when it comes to nutrition an science what else is new? :)

I have a bag of soy beans, that i thought I could grind up and add to my bread, but, boy, is it hard to grind!!! I think I'll just buy soy flour that's already ground up. But I need to know what to do with all my unground beans...


I'd say boil them and make some good ole soy milk and okara. Or, another alternative may be to get some pea shooters for the kids and let them have at it. It has occurred to me a time or two that these beans look like they would have a high velocity great trajectory. :)

If you think you want to give soy milk and/or okara a shot let me know and I'll post the milk process and some other okara cooking helps that may allow you to have a shorter learning curve than I did. I have learned some tricks that are not readily available online that really help in terms of appearance and taste of the milk and okara.

--Rick

PS In the first chai recipe above, I noticed that I had shown 1-7 white peppercorns. I have changed it to what it should be which is 6-7 white peppercorns.

#34 Shelley Platt

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Posted 09 March 2008 - 05:04 PM

I've been making small loaves of bread daily, and substituting spelt flour for wheat. Here is a video with the recipe and tutorial from the book Artisan Bread in Five Minutes a Day. The book has lots of variations for all sorts of breads.


#35 Nina

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Posted 10 March 2008 - 12:32 AM

There are some recipes without oil in this book preview on line.

#36 Nina

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Posted 18 March 2008 - 04:42 PM

A very easy/good/healthy/without oil salad recipe that my mom and grandmother made always for fasting days:

1. Toss olives with pieces of oranges. Allow some minutes for the juices to combine and mix again. If desired scallions, or onions may be added. Serve with bread.

When oil is permitted, you can add some oil. Do not add salt if the olives are salty already. Also I like to use olives from Halkidiki (ask at a Greek store if you have one near by) since the kind of olive used is crucial for the taste of this recipe. The orange should be not very sweet, but definitely on the sweet side to achieve a great balance in the combination. The pieces of orange should be cut like little pyramids (I think because it does not mush them and it allows a bit from the juices to marinate together with the olives. However, you may combine according to your own taste.

2. Another great food during lent is koliva since it is prepared without oil. We had three Saturdays of the Souls these past weeks and it was so yummy to have koliva. Although one must distribute for the soul of the loved one as much koliva as they can after the service. But there is always a bit left at the end. And I always make some more. :) However if you can not consume it, do not leave koliva overnight. Also if it is blessed do not throw it in the waste, but place it higher somewhere where people, or animals do not step on. If there are birds around place it where birds can consume the koliva.

3. Similar to Koliva: Also what is called 'Noah's pudding', or known as 'Ashure' it is a great dessert for Lent. There are many recipes and versions of it and it is made by Christians, Jewish and Muslims alike. All have their own versions. Google the recipes and choose a favorite. :)

#37 Matushka Elizabeth P.

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Posted 18 March 2008 - 07:35 PM

Fasolada - Greek Bean Soup

Several years ago, a young student named Eleni, from Larisa in Greece, attended the local University of Texas, Pan American. She became like another daughter to us and often spent weekends with our family. Eleni was the first to teach us about Fasolada. She told us her mother made it at least several times a week during the Great Fast. To make her feel more at home, I tried to come up with a recipe for this wonderful Greek Bean Soup. I found and adapted the recipe below and it’s very good. The original came from: http://greekfood.bellaonline.com

The following history comes from the website’s author, who states, “The name of this soup is derived from the Greek name for bean, which is "fasolia." It is often spelled fassolada or fasolatha when translated in to English. There are those who consider Fasolada to be the Greek national dish. To paraphrase an old saying: "all of Greece has been brought up on bean soup." Today fasolada continues as a staple in the Greek villages. Eaten with fresh crusty Greek bread, some feta cheese if not during a fast, and a handful of Greek olives, fasolada makes a wonderful, complete dinner. Some people believe the dish should be made with chicken stock instead of water, but given the possible age of the original dish, and the fact that it is normal fare during fasting seasons, it seems more likely plain water or a vegetable stock was originally used instead. Either way you choose to make it, fasolada makes a very welcome hot and hearty soup on a cold day or during the spring Lenten fast.”

1 1/2 Cups Dried White Beans (Great Northern, for example) or equiv. canned
2 – 3 Carrots, Diced
2 – 3 Stalks Celery, with Leaves, Diced
2 Onions, Chopped
5 Roma Tomatoes, Chopped, or a Can of Diced Tomatoes
3 Cloves Fresh Garlic, Minced
2 Qts. Water or Vegetable Stock
1 Tsp. Dried Thyme of Several Sprigs Fresh Thyme
2 Tsp. Dried Oregano
Optional: 1/3 Cup Olive Oil, if an "Oil" Day
Freshly Ground Black Pepper, To Taste (1/2 tsp)
Salt, To Taste

Soak the beans, in water to cover 2 inches above the beans, overnight.
This reduces the "gassy" nature of the beans. Drain the beans.

In to a large soup pot add carrots, celery, onions and garlic. Saute in a bit of olive oil until the vegetables are softened. Add water (or stock), thyme and oregano, beans and tomatoes. Bring to a boil, then simmer, covered, until the beans are tender or about 2 1/2 hours. Add the remaining olive oil, if not fasting, as well as pepper and salt. Return to the heat thoroughly. Simmer for about 10 additional minutes and serve. This serves 6 - 8 people as a main dish soup.

St. George's Orthodox Church
Rio Grande Valley of Tropical South Texas
www.stgeorgepantry.org
http://matushkaelizabeth.vox.com/

Edited by M.C. Steenberg, 18 March 2008 - 08:32 PM.
Removed series of broken font tags


#38 Matushka Elizabeth P.

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Posted 18 March 2008 - 07:38 PM

Last year, I put up many of my fasting recipes on our parish outreach ministries website at: http://www.stgeorgep...ianrecipes.html

Perhaps some of these recipes will be helpful to others here, as these wonderful entries will be to me. Many thanks!

#39 Effie Ganatsios

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Posted 21 March 2008 - 07:53 AM

Garlic Rosemary Lentil

This one has no oil either, and it's the one that I had too much of, that I added to the leek soup. It's really good. I think I'll add some to our spaghetti sauce next, and see what happens.

5 cups water
3 cups chopped onion
2 cans (14.5oz each) of white beans
1 cup diced carrots
1 tsp dried rosemary, crushed - seems like a lot, but it turned out good
3/4 tsp sage (I only had ground sage, but it worked)
1 lb. dried lentils, sorted and rinsed
2 gloves garlic, pressed
1/2 bay leaf
salt and pepper to taste

Combine everything in a slow cooker (crock pot) and cook on low for 6 hrs or on high for 3 hrs. In a pressure cooker - cook for about 5 minutes.

Serve with salad and bread.

First time I made it, it was soupy, because I made it just before we ate. This last time, I made it early in the day. When I opened my pressure cooker in the evening, all the liquid had been absorbed! It looked like we could use it for filling tortillas, which we'll try next time. But, since it was so much drier, it was hard to eat it with bread. But, just with romaine leaves, it was great.


Mary, this recipe sounds wonderful and it is full of goodness. I don't use anything out of a can, so I suppose I could soak lima beans overnight, put them in a pressure cooker and cook until soft and then use them with your recipe. This would work for me. I have never thought of lentils and dried beans together but it sounds good.

I can also use fresh rosemary and sage instead of dried, only a little more than you recommend. I have the most amazing bay leaf bush. Ever since I started to use its leaves I have realized that the dried stuff we get in the supermarket is totally useless. The same applies to most herbs I feel. My oregano plant disappeared last year (the year we didn't have any snow so I didn't bother to cover it with mulch and protect it). I have dried oregano from two years ago and when you open the jar the aroma is incredible. This set me to thinking about storebought dried herbs and how long they are stored before they reach our table. Normally, herbs are supposed to be used for one year only, but as my dried oregano proves, and judging by the aroma, the packaged herbs are much, much older than that.

Thank you for this lovely thread.

Effie

#40 Effie Ganatsios

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Posted 21 March 2008 - 08:05 AM

[quote name='Matushka Elizabeth P.']Fasolada - Greek Bean Soup

The original came from: http://greekfood.bellaonline.com

The following history comes from the website’s author, who states, “The name of this soup is derived from the Greek name for bean, which is "fasolia." It is often spelled fassolada or fasolatha when translated in to English. There are those who consider Fasolada to be the Greek national dish. To paraphrase an old saying: "all of Greece has been brought up on bean soup." Today fasolada continues as a staple in the Greek villages. Eaten with fresh crusty Greek bread, some feta cheese if not during a fast, and a handful of Greek olives, fasolada makes a wonderful, complete dinner. Some people believe the dish should be made with chicken stock instead of water, but given the possible age of the original dish, and the fact that it is normal fare during fasting seasons, it seems more likely plain water or a vegetable stock was originally used instead. Either way you choose to make it, fasolada makes a very welcome hot and hearty soup on a cold day or during the spring Lenten fast.”

1 1/2 Cups Dried White Beans (Great Northern, for example) or equiv. canned
2 – 3 Carrots, Diced
2 – 3 Stalks Celery, with Leaves, Diced
2 Onions, Chopped
5 Roma Tomatoes, Chopped, or a Can of Diced Tomatoes
3 Cloves Fresh Garlic, Minced
2 Qts. Water or Vegetable Stock
1 Tsp. Dried Thyme of Several Sprigs Fresh Thyme
2 Tsp. Dried Oregano
Optional: 1/3 Cup Olive Oil, if an "Oil" Day
Freshly Ground Black Pepper, To Taste (1/2 tsp)
Salt, To Taste

Soak the beans, in water to cover 2 inches above the beans, overnight.
This reduces the "gassy" nature of the beans. Drain the beans.

In to a large soup pot add carrots, celery, onions and garlic. Saute in a bit of olive oil until the vegetables are softened. Add water (or stock), thyme and oregano, beans and tomatoes. Bring to a boil, then simmer, covered, until the beans are tender or about 2 1/2 hours. Add the remaining olive oil, if not fasting, as well as pepper and salt. Return to the heat thoroughly. Simmer for about 10 additional minutes and serve. This serves 6 - 8 people as a main dish soup.

QUOTE]

Hello, Elizabeth. Fasolada is indeed a common weekly dish in all traditional Greek homes. It is full of nutrition and goodness.

Just some comments on your recipe. I don't use garlic with beans, except when cooking red beans with tomato sauce and parsley (a totally different dish). Nor do I use thyme and oregano. My mum adds cubed carrots and potatoes but I don't because my family prefers me not to. I also add a generous amount of paprika.

I don't use stock, whether meat or vegetable, but I add amounts of hot water as needed.

Variation : When using the very large lima beans I simmer until nearly all the water has been absorbed, I then add a little olive oil, salt, pepper and paprika and put the whole thing in the oven. I then serve it hot, with a small teaspoon of olive oil and lemon juice on top.

When not fasting I also crumble feta cheese on top of the mixture and allow it to bake for a few minutes, until there is a nice crust on top. Lots of women add hot chilli pepper (boukovo) to the beans while they are cooking.

No matter what version you use, fasolada is still delicious.

Fasoli means bean and Fasolada means bean soup with olive oil. Fasolakia means green beans.

Effie




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