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Which versions of the LXX are best?


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#1 Kris

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Posted 15 February 2008 - 04:27 PM

Brenton's edition is riddled from start to finish with extraordinary errors; and beyond this, is not truly the Septuagint: it is essentially a Greek version of the Hebrew canon, so reassembled and manufactured by Brenton from LXX texts. It includes the books and verses of the Hebrew canon, with non-Hebrew material as an apocrypha, and the in-line content of most books altered to accord with the Hebrew editions.


While I was aware that Brenton's translation left much to be desired, I was not aware that the Greek text found in his edition was so far removed from the original LXX.

As such, I'm left needing to buy another Greek Old Testament. The only available adition I've come across online is Rahlfs and Hanhart's Septuaginta. The edition is based on the Codex Vaticanus, but with the Codex Alexandrinus and Sinaiticus being prefered in certain places.

Is this a good edition to get? How much does it differ from the texts used in the Church's liturgical cycle?

Also, if I go to a normal church bookstore (or the one at Essex), will all the Greek Old Testaments correspond with that of the Church, or are there varied editions? And if there are variations, which should I get?

Thanks!

In XC,
Kris

#2 Christophoros

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Posted 15 February 2008 - 08:05 PM

May I suggest an ecclesiastical Septuagint utilized by the Church of Greece and published by Apostoliki Diakonia?

http://www.apostolik...op/default.aspx

This edition is also online:

http://www.apostolik...asp&main=OldTes

#3 Kris

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Posted 15 February 2008 - 08:17 PM

May I suggest an ecclesiastical Septuagint utilized by the Church of Greece and published by Apostoliki Diakonia?

http://www.apostolik...op/default.aspx

This edition is also online:

http://www.apostolik...asp&main=OldTes


Thanks for the link. Now that I have the details from the website I can probably ask the bookshop near my church to order it for me. I would order it online, but I don't trust my poor Greek in any situation involving a credit card.

#4 Michael Stickles

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Posted 15 February 2008 - 09:19 PM

Thanks, Christophoros - that link to the online edition is going in my favorites.

Kris, Holy Cross Bookstore offers the Zoe Brotherhood version of the Septuagint text (their volume also includes the Greek NT), which is the other modified version of Rahlf's LXX text that Christophoros mentioned in the other thread (as one of the texts used by P. Papoutsis as a basis for the Holy Orthodox Bible). It's a little more expensive ($37.50 versus 20€ = ~$30), but that would eliminate the language worries in using your credit card :-).

The Rahlf edition itself can be viewed online at the University of Frankfurt's TITUS project website. When I first looked at the site, the Greek text was not fully readable (lots of little boxes where letters should have been), but changing my browser's default font to Microsoft Sans Serif took care of the problem (Arial and Times New Roman didn't work). The Apostoliki Diakonia online text doesn't give me that problem.

I also looked for the Moscow Edition of the Septuagint, but to no avail. I did find one copy of Grabe's Septuagint (which the Moscow Edition came from) at Alibris.com, but it is an original early 1700's edition priced at $1182. A little (OK, a lot) out of my price range.

Mike

#5 Anthony

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Posted 11 February 2009 - 05:51 PM

As such, I'm left needing to buy another Greek Old Testament. The only available adition I've come across online is Rahlfs and Hanhart's Septuaginta. The edition is based on the Codex Vaticanus, but with the Codex Alexandrinus and Sinaiticus being prefered in certain places.

Is this a good edition to get? How much does it differ from the texts used in the Church's liturgical cycle?


Just to go back for a moment to the original question (which doesn't mean I am not grateful for the other information and links provided), I would also be interested to know how satisfactory the Rahlfs edition is from an Orthodox point of view, from anybody who is familiar with it.

#6 Michael Stickles

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Posted 11 February 2009 - 07:00 PM

Just to go back for a moment to the original question (which doesn't mean I am not grateful for the other information and links provided), I would also be interested to know how satisfactory the Rahlfs edition is from an Orthodox point of view, from anybody who is familiar with it.


Anthony,

There is a thread titled "Different English editions of the Septuagint: Which to use?" which was active from Oct. 2003 through June 2005 (total of 83 posts). I haven't done more than scan through it, but it might have the sort of information you're seeking (beware of the off-topic rabbit trails which start popping up on page two).

The threads "Bible Translations" and "Church Translations of the Bible" might also have useful insights, though I think they focus on whole Bibles (OT+NT), and I haven't scanned to see if they cover the LXX at all.

Unfortunately, I'm afraid that one of Dcn. Matthew's comments from the first thread I mentioned may still be true:

The genuine 'Orthodox edition' of the LXX can only be found scattered across the huge numbers of Liturgical texts that quote from it, and in the writings of the Fathers that do the same -- this is why it so difficult to determine the Orthodox reading of the text. If you are interested in deeply understanding the text itself, I would recommend that you obtain both Rahlfs' second edition and the A.D. (Apostoliki Diakonia) volume, so that you can see for yourself how the two relate.


In Christ,
Michael

#7 Anthony

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Posted 11 February 2009 - 07:25 PM

Thank you very much, Michael, there is indeed much useful and relevant information in that thread, especially Fr Matthew's comments. I think I will try to get hold of the Rahlfs text (which should also be particularly easy right here).




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