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Announcing social groups?


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#1 Amy

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Posted 03 April 2008 - 09:28 PM

Thanks to Nina, I have figured out how to start a social group. Once that is accomplished, how do you announce your group so that others may join?

#2 Paul Cowan

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Posted 04 April 2008 - 03:04 AM

Just as you are now doing.

And for those interested, there are 3 social groups I would like to invite you all to participate in.

Orthodox Christians in and from Texas.

and

Altar Servers

and

Friends of Athonite Monasteries in North America

I think the social groups are a unique feature to Monachos and with focused interest, perhaps we can stay on topic and/or find things a little easier when searching specific subjects?

Paul

#3 Amy

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Posted 04 April 2008 - 03:38 AM

Oh. Well, in that case, if anyone is interested I've started a group for converts to Orthodoxy and would enjoy meeting others who have been on this path. :)

Please join us here: Converts to Orthodoxy

#4 Anthony

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Posted 04 April 2008 - 11:49 AM

I would also like to invite people to this social group for people interested in languages.

I think these social groups are an excellent idea, and would welcome some comments on the intended "division of labour" between them and the main fora.

#5 Anthony

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Posted 09 September 2008 - 04:34 PM

I have started a social group for people living in Germany and central Europe (an area with a much sparser Orthodox population, it seems, than Texas ;)).

A few possible topics of interest:

- Places of interest / pilgrimage.
- Orthodox literature in German, and general awareness of Orthodoxy in the area.

I have noticed that there are some German members here who do not post much and apologize for their "poor" English (actually a lot better than my German). Subject to Monachos policies, I don't see why messages in German should not be equally welcome in this group.

#6 Paul Cowan

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Posted 10 September 2008 - 04:46 AM

Hi Anthony,

Yes, we Texans are a very proud bunch. At least this Texan is. ::rolleyes: I too would like to see more activity in the social groups section of the website. I have to admit, I forget it is there most of the times and only go there sporadicaly to see if anyone has posted. Perhaps you restarting this thread will get more interest there.

I see nothing wrong with any foreign language not being acceptable with the social group set up for it; just not probable on the general message board. Here is the link for those that don't know where the social groups section is.

The BBQ lovin' Texan
Paul

#7 Father David Moser

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Posted 10 September 2008 - 06:18 PM

I have noticed that there are some German members here who do not post much and apologize for their "poor" English (actually a lot better than my German). Subject to Monachos policies, I don't see why messages in German should not be equally welcome in this group.


While there is no stated policy regarding language in the discussion forum, may I share with you the comments of the website founder, Fr Dcn Matthew Steenberg: "Regarding language, we've not in past years felt a need to indicate specifically in the TOU any language requirements, as the lingua franca has from the beginning been English. This is certainly how I (personally) would wish to see the main forum continue, as it's part of who and what we are as a community of discussions." This does not mean that occasional posts in a language other than English would not be welcome - especially when such linguistic variety would prove to make an important point or draw out a nuance not otherwise noted in the conversation. However, the expectation is that the default and major language of posts in the forum would be in English.

This is a separate issue from the various social/special interest groups that might be formed. There is certainly nothing that would prohibit a bi-lingual or even monolingual non-English social group.

Fr David Moser

Edited by Father David Moser, 10 September 2008 - 06:18 PM.
correct typo


#8 Anthony

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Posted 11 September 2008 - 01:49 PM

The BBQ lovin' Texan


They are pretty serious about "grilling" in this neck of the woods too. Anything to do with beer and sausages... ;) Though I still think the steaks are better in Scotland, and no doubt in Texas too.

Thank you, Father, for the clarification on language. I didn't envisage German being the general language of the group - just that people who are not confident in English might write in German and expect to be understood. I for one will be posting in English.

#9 Paul Cowan

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Posted 11 September 2008 - 02:03 PM

They are pretty serious about "grilling" in this neck of the woods too. Anything to do with beer and sausages... ;) Though I still think the steaks are better in Scotland, and no doubt in Texas too.

.


You all might enjoy this Review of BBQ. It is from my associate priest's blogsite who got it from another priest's blogsite. Yes, we are all Texans, and well, Houstonians too. :P enjoy.

Paul

PS: Notice Texas is the only state that uses beef. interesting huh?

#10 Anthony

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Posted 11 September 2008 - 02:37 PM

Those look good healthy portions too. About half a cow each, as far as I could see.

Was that melitzanosalata in the South Carolina bit?

#11 Paul Cowan

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Posted 11 September 2008 - 08:35 PM

Those look good healthy portions too. About half a cow each, as far as I could see.

Was that melitzanosalata in the South Carolina bit?


Only the Texas piece has beef (cow). The other states use pork (pig) except one uses sheep.

I don't know that word. It has too many syllables to be a word used from the South. It looked like mush to me. probably cornbread mush.

Edited by Paul Cowan, 11 September 2008 - 08:41 PM.
clarification


#12 Olga

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Posted 11 September 2008 - 11:04 PM

Paul, melitzanosalata is what the Greeks call baba ghanoush, a dip or spread made from roasted eggplant, garlic, olive oil and lemon juice. YUM! :)

#13 Paul Cowan

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Posted 11 September 2008 - 11:20 PM

Oh, well; then yes, of course I have heard of it. And love eating it too. But not with BBQ unless it is left in its premashed state of grilling. You can grill most anything (cob corn, squash, tomatoes, cheese), but once you change its natural state, then it really shouldn't be eaten with BBQ. The only exception would be hot potato salad. (heavy on the mustard. not mayonaise). Mayonaise was a Yankee introduction to the South and it is just a sad state of affairs it has caught on as it has.

Mustard has always been preferred since it can be left out on a hot picnic day and not spoil. Mayonaise unless it is kept refreigerated will spoil within minutes in the hot Texas heat. Yankees would not know anything about HOT unless they spent a summer down here or have eaten a habenero. And for any of you manly men wanting to prove you can handle being in the South by eating one of these pearls of sweat, if you put salt on the burning part of your mouth after you eat one (or try to) it will help take the sting out. Sometimes bread or a soda will also work.

Anyway, I suppose even in Greece there are local customs for what ya'll would call BBQ and the proper fixin's for it, but like I told Fr. Joseph on his blog, "If it ain't from Texas, it ain't BBQ".

Dang it, now I'm hungry. Hurricane or no hurricane, I'm grill'n this weekend. Who's with me boys? BYOB (bring your own beef)

Paul

#14 Olga

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Posted 11 September 2008 - 11:44 PM

"If it ain't from Texas, it ain't BBQ"


Oooh, Paul, best you don't try that line on an Aussie! :D As for chilli, there's a concoction called Chilli Fire, made right here in South Australia, billed as "arguably Australia's HOTTEST condiment". I can assure you it's off the Richter scale.

#15 Paul Cowan

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Posted 12 September 2008 - 12:16 AM

Oooh, Paul, best you don't try that line on an Aussie! :D As for chilli, there's a concoction called Chilli Fire, made right here in South Australia, billed as "arguably Australia's HOTTEST condiment". I can assure you it's off the Richter scale.


Dearest Olga (as I pat your dear sweet hand)

I checked out your Aussie condiment but have to say, I can one up it here. I know you Aussie's are as proud as we Texans are but you really can't compare the two world's. BBQ gator or kangaroo is not the same as corn fed beef or sow. I sure wish we could have this discussion on the social group side of the house. (I had to find a way to make this relevent to the thread)

Actually to be on term, it is called a scofield unit of heat. To get an idea of the range of heat here, a jalapeno is about 2,500 scofields (relatively mild) while these sauces are as high as 13,000,000 scofields. These are NOT edible sauces without extreme dilution. Your Chilli Fire is only about 300,000 units hot. Respectible, don't get me wrong. We need o have a Monachos cook off and invite the moderators over to be judges.

The main rule of any BBQ cookoff here locally is the judge will not try any concotion without the cook first eating it. There have been cases of judges getting hurt from eating BBQ made too hot. And I would be glad to help sample ya'lls cooking.

Paul

#16 Father David Moser

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Posted 12 September 2008 - 02:36 AM

We need o have a Monachos cook off and invite the moderators over to be judges.


I am IN!!!!!!!!!

Fr David Moser

#17 Olga

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Posted 12 September 2008 - 05:33 AM

We need to have a Monachos cook off and invite the moderators over to be judges.


Well, that means the judges are Fr David and Fr Matthew. Fr Raphael could judge fish or seafood, if it's on the menu. But where should this cook-off take place? :P

BBQ gator or kangaroo is not the same as corn fed beef or sow.


My friend, gator is non-existent (and crocodile is hard to come by at the butcher's), and roo (strange as it may seem) is hardly staple fare here, though it's delicious, as long as it is not overcooked (very easy to do, as it's so lean).

The Great Aussie Barbie MUST, repeat, MUST, have lamb in some form, as well as beef. In recent years, the Australian livestock industry has run a hilarious and satirical series of ads exhorting the people of Australia to eat lamb on Australia Day (January 26) as a patriotic duty.

http://en.wikipedia....ki/Sam_Kekovich

Pork has always run a distant third behind lamb and beef here, especially for barbecuing. Most Aussies eat their pork as roasts, or in stir-frys and other Asian-style dishes which are increasingly popular.

Greek-Australians are unsurpassed at spit-roasted lamb, and if you want good BBQ pork, or pig on spit, you can't go wrong with a Slav or Italian doing the honours.

Actually to be on term, it is called a scofield unit of heat. To get an idea of the range of heat here, a jalapeno is about 2,500 scofields (relatively mild) while these sauces are as high as 13,000,000 scofields.


Interesting! Thanks for this.

#18 Fr Raphael Vereshack

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Posted 12 September 2008 - 01:41 PM

Greek-Australians are unsurpassed at spit-roasted lamb, and if you want good BBQ pork, or pig on spit, you can't go wrong with a Slav or Italian doing the honours.



I don't know. Sounds a bit too basic for me. :)

#19 Paul Cowan

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Posted 12 September 2008 - 06:13 PM

Well, that means the judges are Fr David and Fr Matthew. Fr Raphael could judge fish or seafood, if it's on the menu. But where should this cook-off take place?


Well, obviously as the tension mounts, we will need a neutral location. We'll have to put the word out to see which country can be most impartial. It's probably NOT this one. (Thanks to Fr. Dcn. for posting this) And yes, We will of course have a speciality cookoff arena to accomodate Fr. Raphael's carnivorous restrictions.

My friend, gator is non-existent



Oh contrar my dear. American alligator has made a comeback even to the point of gator farms. As exotic meat goes, this is some of the less expensive to buy.

Pork has always run a distant third behind lamb and beef here, especially for barbecuing. Most Aussies eat their pork as roasts, or in stir-frys and other Asian-style dishes which are increasingly popular.

Greek-Australians are unsurpassed at spit-roasted lamb, and if you want good BBQ pork, or pig on spit, you can't go wrong with a Slav or Italian doing the honours.


There are always regional speciality differences. I just can't see a spit doing justice to a fine piece of meat that needs to be over a slow bed of mesquite coals.

I posted a BBQ rub on the "Orthodox in and from Texas" Social Group if anyone is interested.

So, whose country is going to host our cookoff?

#20 Effie Ganatsios

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Posted 12 September 2008 - 07:37 PM

Oooh, Paul, best you don't try that line on an Aussie! :D As for chilli, there's a concoction called Chilli Fire, made right here in South Australia, billed as "arguably Australia's HOTTEST condiment". I can assure you it's off the Richter scale.


I was about to say something about the Aussie barbie but you beat me to it Olga.

We even have a song titled : Toss another shrimp on the barbie



And what about that great TV series Surfing the menu with
Curtis Stone. One of the best.........

B.B.Q King Prawns with Olive Oil, Lemon Juice and Fresh Parsley by Curtis Stone

Ingredients:
20 king prawns, cut in half lengthways with shell on
4 tbsp extra virgin olive oil
3 lemons, zest & juice
2 tbsp flat leaf parsley, roughly chopped
2 small chillies, finely chopped

Method:
Preheat BBQ or grill pan to high

Drizzle prawns with olive oil and place flesh side down onto BBQ or grill for 30 seconds

Turn the prawns, add chilli, lemon zest and parsley, and squeeze over lemon juice

Once prawns are cooked, remove from heat, drizzle the excess sauce over them and serve.




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