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What type of oil to use in a lampada?


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#41 Justin Farr

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Posted 19 January 2009 - 05:54 AM

This is the only scented oil that I found and it is not for burning in the vigil lamp but rather to be added to the blessed oil used for anointing (such as that blessed at Litia or oil taken from the lamp at the shrine of a saint.) I don't know that burning scented oil would distribute much of a scent since it only really works if the scented oil is heated releasing the aroma before it is burnt.

Fr David Moser


Father,

http://orthodoxincen...vigillamps.html :)

I've thought about buying some myself... :)

#42 Rdr Andreas

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Posted 19 January 2009 - 07:05 AM

When I was at the Troitse Sergieyeva Lavra recently, Archimandrite Alipiy told me that he had discussed lamp oil with a visiting Greek priest and gave him a bottle of the oil Russians use. I don't know what it's made from but it's not olive oil. The Greek priest, not realising that Russian oil is not edible, used some on his food and was violently ill!

#43 Vasiliki D.

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Posted 19 January 2009 - 07:39 AM

The idea sounds lovely, however, I would be very cautious to open an avenue that has its origins mixed into Oriental mysticism ... when we start to introduce things because they are nice ...we can often introduce something more complex than we know ...

A lot of scented/aroma therapy oils have prayers done over them ....that are not Orthodox in their origin. I wont dwelve into what I have been told further but it is safer to err on the side of caution than to offer God an impure offering (as per Old Testament)

The other thing I wanted to point out is that the old fashioned tradition for Vigil lamp was to mix: Water, Oil and Red Wine and burn the three ...not many people I know do this other than some very very very old people I visit (who have one foot in the grave but some very very old fashioned and gorgeous traditions)

#44 Nina

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Posted 21 January 2009 - 02:45 PM

The idea sounds lovely, however, I would be very cautious to open an avenue that has its origins mixed into Oriental mysticism ... when we start to introduce things because they are nice ...we can often introduce something more complex than we know ...

A lot of scented/aroma therapy oils have prayers done over them ....that are not Orthodox in their origin. I wont dwelve into what I have been told further but it is safer to err on the side of caution than to offer God an impure offering (as per Old Testament)

The other thing I wanted to point out is that the old fashioned tradition for Vigil lamp was to mix: Water, Oil and Red Wine and burn the three ...not many people I know do this other than some very very very old people I visit (who have one foot in the grave but some very very old fashioned and gorgeous traditions)


I see... and you are right!

Why red wine?

#45 Vasiliki D.

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Posted 22 January 2009 - 12:56 AM

I see... and you are right!

Why red wine?


Oh dear, I wish I had seen this question last night before i went for my walk. I went and visited Mparmpa Christos, the old man I mentioned (can everyone please pray for him - he is very very old and I think coming to the end of his road and in much pain - a blessed little old man) ... I recall he mentioned something about a reference to oil, water and wine not mixing and something about it being a reference in the Bible ... I will find out when I next visit or call my dear old pappouli :-)

#46 Paul Cowan

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Posted 22 January 2009 - 04:46 AM

Why red wine?


I would say, the water and wine represent the water and blood that poured from the side of Christ at His crucifixion. The oil is of course for burning, but also for anointing. Everything in the EO is symbolic of something. Since water and oil do not mix, water will always be on the bottom. It is also heavier than wine, so you will have the three always separate yet together. A double comparison. One of the crucifixion and one of the Trinity.

#47 Josh Sundheim

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Posted 25 January 2009 - 04:05 AM

Forgive me if this is a total newbie question -- but why does my little cork float keep turning over? My first wick burned for about 5 days with little maintenance except filling of the oil. After replacing it I couldn't seem to keep the wick upright. It would burn for a little while and then turn over and go out. Since I've not actually seen it happen, I can only hypothesize that it only turns over when it goes out, meaning maybe it wasn't wicking up enough oil. Any ideas?

#48 Vasiliki D.

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Posted 25 January 2009 - 06:26 AM

Forgive me if this is a total newbie question -- but why does my little cork float keep turning over? My first wick burned for about 5 days with little maintenance except filling of the oil. After replacing it I couldn't seem to keep the wick upright. It would burn for a little while and then turn over and go out. Since I've not actually seen it happen, I can only hypothesize that it only turns over when it goes out, meaning maybe it wasn't wicking up enough oil. Any ideas?


This is not anything metaphysical :-) This happens to MANY people ... reason, depends on the quality of the cork that they use in the manufacturing process ... sometimes you get a dud in every so many ... so, the pressure from the heat generated by the flame versus the density of the oil pushes/creates an imbalance of pressure above and below the cork ... overturn.

#49 Josh Sundheim

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Posted 26 January 2009 - 04:27 PM

Looks like it was just a bum wick. I changed out the wick and it's been lit for two whole days now. I realize that a lamp needs maintenance and attention, thus bringing our minds to Christ and the light of Christ which it represents, but I sure did get a little frustrated when it wouldn't stay lit!

#50 Josh Sundheim

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Posted 30 January 2009 - 01:11 PM

I switched from the floating wax wicks because my float keeps turning upside down when refilling the lamp.


I'm still having issues with my cork float turning over. It doesn't do it when I'm filling the oil, though. It just turns over on its own. Sometimes I'll just change the wick and it'll go for a day or two without tipping over and sometimes it'll just got a few minutes (or even a few seconds after lighting).

I'm about to give up on the cork float perhaps try using a long cotton wick with the cork float. My friend does that and he says his cork never turns over. Or maybe it's time I try one of the brass Russian-style wick holders.

#51 Herman Blaydoe

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Posted 30 January 2009 - 01:37 PM

I strongly suspect that "quality control" is not strongly emphasized in the manufacturing process for the waxed wicks and the cork floats. The floats need to be replaced from time to time because the cork can become saturated with oil if it is low quality, with larger pores for the oil to seep into. This means one of the floats (there are usually three) becomes heavier than the others. Or it may have been poorly cut and one may be smaller than the others or less dense. This will cause that float to flip over and the only solution is to replace it.

Herman the lampada-tending Pooh

#52 Rdr Andreas

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Posted 30 January 2009 - 03:08 PM

Or maybe it's time I try one of the brass Russian-style wick holders.


I've found these to be much more convenient.

#53 Father David Moser

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Posted 30 January 2009 - 04:36 PM

The floats need to be replaced from time to time because the cork can become saturated with oil if it is low quality, with larger pores for the oil to seep into. This means one of the floats (there are usually three) becomes heavier than the others. Or it may have been poorly cut and one may be smaller than the others or less dense. This will cause that float to flip over and the only solution is to replace it.


I have a variety of floats - the ones that are comprised of a single piece of cork overed by metal always turn over on me - I have not found them to work well at all. The ones that Herman describes - kind of like a three legged stool with a separate cork float on each leg - work quite well and I have never had trouble with those tipping over.

Fr David Moser

#54 Josh Sundheim

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Posted 30 January 2009 - 04:46 PM

I've found these to be much more convenient.


I've read on various message boards, etc., that the brass wick holders can be hard to keep lit, but my parish church uses those exclusively and I've yet to notice any lamps going out during Liturgy. I will have to give them a try.

I look forward to the time when finances allow that I might get our first hanging lamp for our home. We have a standing lamp before an icon of our Most Pure Mother but it's not anywhere near our actual icon corner.

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#55 Josh Sundheim

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Posted 30 January 2009 - 04:51 PM

The ones that Herman describes - kind of like a three legged stool with a separate cork float on each leg - work quite well and I have never had trouble with those tipping over.

Fr David Moser


Thank you, Father, for the suggestion. Where might one order that kind?

#56 Father David Moser

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Posted 30 January 2009 - 07:21 PM

Thank you, Father, for the suggestion. Where might one order that kind?


AFAIK they just come in the package with the wicks.

#57 Theodora E.

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Posted 01 February 2009 - 02:32 AM

I have a variety of floats - the ones that are comprised of a single piece of cork overed by metal always turn over on me - I have not found them to work well at all. The ones that Herman describes - kind of like a three legged stool with a separate cork float on each leg - work quite well and I have never had trouble with those tipping over.

Fr David Moser


I'll have to agree with Fr. David on this one. I've also found that the round floats are difficult to get the wick inserted properly. The three-legged ones are much easier to insert the wick into.

As to make sure you get the correct float, if you can't tell from the website you're ordering on, call or email.

Edited to add link to supplier for three-legged floats:

http://www.easternch...i/c39/c55/41388

#58 Theodora E.

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Posted 01 February 2009 - 09:10 PM

Actually, this reminds me to ask a question I've wondered about. I use the little waxed wicks (I have some that are the pink-paraffin-coated ones and others that are beeswax coated). I only burn my lamp in the evenings during the week and then most of the day on weekends. I almost always use a fresh wick each time I go to light my lamp. Never thought of doing otherwise until a friend (she uses candles) saw me tending to my lamp and said using a new wick each time seemed wasteful.

What do YOU do on a non-24 hour burning lamp?

#59 Paul Cowan

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Posted 01 February 2009 - 09:17 PM

Behind out altar there are windows to the outside. In these window alcoves is a oil lamp. We light them for services and blow them out when we are done. What's wrong with doing that at home? If they burn out, replace them. If not, you are being frugal.

my 2 cents.

Paul

#60 Herman Blaydoe

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Posted 01 February 2009 - 09:29 PM

Actually, this reminds me to ask a question I've wondered about. I use the little waxed wicks (I have some that are the pink-paraffin-coated ones and others that are beeswax coated). I only burn my lamp in the evenings during the week and then most of the day on weekends. I almost always use a fresh wick each time I go to light my lamp. Never thought of doing otherwise until a friend (she uses candles) saw me tending to my lamp and said using a new wick each time seemed wasteful.

What do YOU do on a non-24 hour burning lamp?


Relight the old wick until it does not relight easily, then replace it. But, then again, it is not like this is a "high value" item. We are talking less than pennies here. There could be a spiritual symbolism to using a new wick each time (for you) that might outweigh the material cost. God asks us to be good stewards, not misers or penny-pinchers.

Herman the penny-pinchin' Pooh




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