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What type of oil to use in a lampada?


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#61 Josh Sundheim

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Posted 04 February 2009 - 06:03 PM

A few pieces of a wine cork and a few staples and my float problem is fixed. It's virtually unsinkable now!

#62 Paul Cowan

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Posted 05 February 2009 - 12:26 AM

A few pieces of a wine cork and a few staples and my float problem is fixed. It's virtually unsinkable now!


LOL,

You could always staple a string to the bottom of the cork and tether that to a fishing weight and plunk it down in the bottom of the lampada. If the weight is not too heavy and your string to long, the cork might float dangling the weight and gravity prevents it from tipping. That is if you fish. But your solution seems perfect.

Paul

#63 Olga

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Posted 05 February 2009 - 03:51 AM

LOL,

You could always staple a string to the bottom of the cork and tether that to a fishing weight and plunk it down in the bottom of the lampada. If the weight is not too heavy and your string to long, the cork might float dangling the weight and gravity prevents it from tipping. That is if you fish. But your solution seems perfect.

Paul


Some 2/0 split shot would be about right. And don't use string, use fishing line. Just make sure the line is centred properly, or the float will tip over easily. :))

#64 Patrick

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Posted 07 April 2009 - 06:24 AM

What kind of vigil lamp do most people use?

I use a six ounce lamp, but like in the picture posted by Mr Josh Sundheim, it seems to be a bigger lamp. Where can I get such a much larger lamp. Mine only burns for around 15 hours before having to cut the wick and be replaced (as of right now I am using the russian brass wick holders and cotton wicks because my float always turned over when I refilled my oil lamp (does anyone have any suggestion to keep it from turning over? I used the 3-legged corked float described by Herman)which, in my experience, burn away much faster than the pink wax covered wicks).

As stated above, my lamp only burns about 15 hours before the cotton burns away and falls into the lamp, and my little pink wicks with my float only burned about 20 hours before looking really burned and incinerated, but people on here seem to have their burning for a few days at least.

Do most people also have more than one vigil lamp in their home burning at a time? As of right now, I only have one because I only have one place at home with icons, and I try to keep it burning as much as possible. But, do most people also have other places with icons and lamps burning in front of them?

Also, which style of wick holders and, consequently wicks, are better to use: the float and wax wicks or the brass holder and cotton wicks?

#65 Paul Cowan

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Posted 08 April 2009 - 03:57 AM

Unless you live in a cathedral, I don't think it necessary to leave it burning beyond your prayer times. Fire hazard and all.

#66 D. W. Dickens

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Posted 08 April 2009 - 06:46 PM

Unless you live in a cathedral, I don't think it necessary to leave it burning beyond your prayer times. Fire hazard and all.


I would love to have an oil lamp burning all the time, however this is a definite concern (my wife would be unable to sleep at night I'm sure). While we light specific beeswax candles during prayers we keep a paraffin candle lit all the time as a vigil. We get them from our parish. There's a slight risk of a mess of wax everywhere, but no risk of fire.

They are very tall and about the width of a tea-style candle light. Either because of the amount of wax or the tall glass tube they are in they burn for a very long time... approx 100 hours. They are inexpensive at $2.50 each (it never hurts to help support the parish either). Less than a dollar a day seems a manageable expense.

I was introduced to them by our Matuska who told me that people use those candles in Church when "something is REALLY bothering them".

I prefer the beeswax, but I haven't yet detected (out of a single candle) any unpleasantness from the paraffin.

#67 Patrick

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Posted 09 April 2009 - 01:43 AM

I keep mine lit as much as possible. I keep it lit when I am out unless I am going to be gone for over 8 or so hours. I doubt it will cause much of a fire hazard (for me at least) because if I keep it lit long enough, the wick will burn and fall into the oil (where it won't cause a fire, no oxygen and not hot enough and whatnot), and eventually, the wick will burn down into the brass holder and go out.

#68 Matthew

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Posted 09 April 2009 - 01:51 AM

For what it's worth, I was recently at the monastery of Saint John the Theologian in Hiram, Ohio. They are a wonderful resource for liturgical items, and I think they have the lampada figured out.

First, they use liquid candle wax. This burns very cleanly, which not only keeps the wicks clean, it keeps the nearby walls and furniture clean, too. Trimming the wicks is now done far, far less often.

For a wick, they use a strand of fiberglass, as used before it's cured with a resin reinforcement. The fiberglass wicks well, but is still efficient. They trim the wicks fairly low in order to consume less liquid candle wax.

For a wick holder, they use a mesh sheet intended for roof storm gutters, cut into strips. These can be easily bent to raise or lower the wick.

I believe that they can supply any of the above, including lamps themselves. Or any other items you might need.

#69 Angie

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Posted 04 August 2016 - 08:52 AM

Would anyone know why our vigil lamp keeps on splattering oil on the icons?

 

It sometimes goes out nicely, but other times it just splatters for a long time before it goes out.

 

We use olive oil and water.


Edited by Angie, 04 August 2016 - 08:52 AM.


#70 Olga

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Posted 04 August 2016 - 03:08 PM

What sort of wick are you using, Angie? The short wax-impregnated ones fitted into a cork float, or a cord that trails into the oil?

 

If the end of a cord wick is in water, as can happen when the oil burns down, sputtering can occur.



#71 Angie

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Posted 05 August 2016 - 01:00 AM

Olga we use the short wax onto the cork float.  I thought it might be the oil we use, but still happens with different olive oils



#72 Olga

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Posted 05 August 2016 - 04:09 AM

Then it could be a problem with the batch of waxed wicks. Try a different brand and see what happens.



#73 Father David Moser

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Posted 05 August 2016 - 01:42 PM

Even with the short waxed wicks, when they burn down to the level of the water there is some "spitting" as the oil layer thins to almost none and some water gets drawn into the oil pool at the base of the float.  This usually only lasts for a couple of seconds, because then the wick goes out and you need to refill the lamp and replace the wick.  If the flame is not very far below the rim of the glass at that point, the steam created that makes the sizzle,will send some droplets of oil over the top.  OTOH, you don't want to go so far down into the lamp because then the flame could weaken the glass and cause it to break eventually.  The reason that I let my lamp always burn out on its own like this is that the last little bit of oil is heavier with residue and if you don't burn it up at this point then the residue collects over successive refills and eventually even when you replace the oil, it mixes with the residue and does not burn as well.

 

Fr David Moser



#74 Lakis Papas

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Posted 05 August 2016 - 04:37 PM

My wife is using a lamp with cover on the top.



#75 Rdr Andreas

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Posted 10 August 2016 - 11:17 PM

To deviate slightly, is there any reason not to prefer tealights in glass votive lamps as opposed to some sort of oil and wick?






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