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The Mountain of Silence (Kyriacos C. Markides)


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#21 Dennis McFarland

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Posted 04 July 2011 - 04:12 AM

I have read this book and found much to chew on. I have reread the book a few times and have lent it to others so they could read it as well. I just my bok case ans see that my copy never made it back to me. I pray that the person who has has derived much benefit from it.

#22 Dana Pope

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Posted 25 July 2011 - 10:17 AM

I went into this book blind, not knowing what to expect. Several people from my parish gave it rave reviews. My interest was piqued. I would have to agree overall with the reviews above. I would not just place this book in someone's hands without a cautionary note. Ultimately, because it has proven to be so popular, I am glad I read it. It wouldn't be my first choice on a book list with so many other good (some great) books out there.

#23 Rob Bergen

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Posted 04 October 2011 - 02:55 AM

Hello all!

I had the privilege of meeting and getting to know Kyriacos Markides through the Greek Orthodox Church of St. George in Bangor, Maine. He is a wonderful man, and, may I add, adds a wonderful baritone to the Divine Liturgy! Kyriacos is passionate about his religion. He is a devout Orthodox, and his book has truly influenced many. The book is not meant to be taken as the personal journey through the Orthodox faith as taken by Kyriacos, but indeed is to be understood as the revelation of the Orthodox faith to the skeptic. I know, I was once with Kyriacos, as a skeptic. But now, I can truly tell each and and everyone of of you, that it is through this experience that Kyriacos has indeed embraced the path to Christ, he is indeed a faithful servant and Orthodox.

#24 Dennis Justison

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Posted 14 October 2011 - 12:08 PM

I had been searching for a faith/spirituality that had "gusto" or something that I could really sink my teeth into. I had grown tired of just going to church and repeating mental doctrine. What is belief good for if it doesn't affect a person's life and those around him/her? I don't really remember why I purchased The Mountain of Silence, except that I must have thought it would give me an eye into the life of a typical Orthodox Christian. This book woke me up like no other book. It has deepened my faith: both the one believed and the one that others see lived. I am on the road to joining the Orthodox Church. ONe thing that has made a lasting impression is that more, than any other Christian faith, I see Orthodoxy as more than beliefs, but there is an "Orthodox Way." There is a life of fasting, praying, and almsgiving that is unique amongst the Orthodox. To me, it makes it more real and authentic. Certainly, not all Orthodox are like Fr. Maximos, but for me, peering in from the outside, when I see people fasting, showing up for Liturgy, and DOING and LIVING some of the teachings of the Church, it definitely inspires me to continue on my journey into the Church. I'd also encourage everyone that they can influence people like me just by smiling at strangers at Divine Liturgy and helping them find their place and to invite them to sit with you for breakfast. That makes Orthodoxy more than something read in a book. Peace to all.

#25 Rick H.

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Posted 14 October 2011 - 12:42 PM

What a great post Dennis! I love this book too for the very reasons you have stated. It had a very positive influence on me.

Yes, "gusto." He doesn't mess around and he is not motivated by fear in any way shape or form. Those who might wish to do a paper on the shape and dimension of fear in Eastern Orthodoxy today will come up completely empty if they try to reference this book.

Even in the first sentence of his Prolegomena he sets the tone:

"When I arrived in America in the early sixties for my higher education, I brought with me a naive faith in the Christian religion, the Church, and the God of my forefathers and grandmothers. It was a taken-for-granted faith based on an upbringing within the insulated and homogeneous confines of Eastern Orthodoxy . . ."

There are two good book titles right there, "A Naive Faith" and "A Taken-For-Granted Faith." Or, maybe one should be the sub-title of the other.

This book is not for those with a spirit of timidity or a spirit of fear. But, for all others it is a must read.

#26 Alice

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Posted 04 July 2013 - 02:14 PM

If you loved this book, by all means, read his next book: 'Gifts of the Desert', and his most recent sequel to both these books: 'Inner River:A Pilgrimage to the heart of Christian spirituality'. I just finished it, and, as with the other books, was sad when I did....

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

#27 Deborah Valentine

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Posted 15 July 2013 - 01:30 AM

I loved the book and learned a lot about Orthodox mysticism and I came to Orthodoxy from agnosticism as well.  So, it spoke clearly to me.



#28 Loucas

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Posted 12 October 2014 - 06:35 PM

I have read all of Mr. Markides books reguarding his relationship with monk/father Maximos. Kyriakos also came to our church to talk about the first book Mountain of Silence. I certainly agree that he takes a scientific aproach at best, however, through talks with Father Maximos and different experiences he is drawn deeper and deeper into the Spiritual World of Orthodox Christianity. I even found his lastet book " Inner River " to be interresting. He and his wife, both scolars, use the methods and teachings of thier perspective trades to help them understand that which may be beyond our comprehention. It is a very 2 demensional approach for me. I embrace the Mystical, Spiritual Truths and do not try to break them down and explain them in a more acedemic fashion. However I realize that many people, especially if they have spent years in studying and teaching and believing in certain scientific and acedemic theories, would need to use those to help them understand Spirituality. Never the less, the books are well written and one can see his groth as he explores the Greek Orthodox Monastic and Spiritual Truths.






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