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Jesus' human body: the image & likeness of God?

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#1 Peter Simko

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Posted 14 February 2014 - 05:42 PM

Blessed pre-lenten season to everyone!

I have an interesting question that is perhaps a bit difficult to ask in words, although it is clear in my head.

Is Jesus Christ's human body (really, His whole human nature i guess) made in the image and likeness of God the same way that my body, for instance, is made in the image and likeness of God?  Or is the body of Christ that mankind experienced physically within history the architype, so that we are made in the image and likeness of the same body we portray in icons, the same body that was pierced and died?  How does Christ's body get affected by being born of the Theotokos when it comes to bearing her image?  Adam begat Seth in his image, so does the same sort of thing take place between Christ and His mother?

I am sorry if the question is confusing, but I am trying to phrase it as best I can--let me know if clarification is needed.  Thank you very much!



#2 Ilaria

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Posted 14 February 2014 - 07:55 PM

I think that the question may be put in some other words: is (was) Christ's body entirely human? If so, then it should have all the human features - including
the main one: the image of God.

Our Orthodox teaching proclaims this truth: He has taken the human nature. 


 

However, indeed, there is a difference between the historical body and the icon body, as we portray it. The icon body portrays the
transfigured body, the body after the Holy Resurrection and Ascension; the transfigured
body is different, has different features. And this is also our aim: to become different, to transfigure our body. 



#3 Kosta

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Posted 15 February 2014 - 04:48 AM

His humanity is like ours in all regards except sin. And yes he took of Mary, his flesh and even humanity is derived from hers and her entire lineage.

#4 Rdr Andreas

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Posted 15 February 2014 - 11:01 AM

I think we have previously discussed the relationship between Christ's humanity and His divinity during His life on earth but I came across something which I hope is not irrelevant here: when, at the Last Supper, Christ spoke the words, 'Take, eat: this is my body', He did so not 'as Master but as the Son of man' (Elder Sophrony).


Edited by Andreas Moran, 15 February 2014 - 11:02 AM.


#5 Peter Simko

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Posted 15 February 2014 - 01:49 PM

So, would I be understanding correctly if I said that Christ's human body was made in the image and likeness of His own divinity? That is fascinating to consider deeply. Also, the glorified body is a transfigured existence, but the relationship to God in terms of image remains, only the likeness is more amplified, yes? Does Christ's body, since He is sinless throughout the incarnation, grow in likeness after His resurrection, or is it already fully in the likeness as well as image of God?

#6 Phoebe K.

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Posted 15 February 2014 - 09:24 PM

In my understanding Christ was always in the fullness of his divinity and humanity, as is seen clearly in his transfiguration.  As I understand it Christ held his humanity in the way it was before the fall, but also in the fullness of what it could be, for the rest of us the state of theoses.  

 

As I understand it Christ showed the full realization of the image and likeness of God, as he was perfect in his divinity and his humanity as we confess in the Creed and in the hymns of the church.  

 

Phoebe



#7 Rdr Andreas

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Posted 16 February 2014 - 01:40 AM

I agree with Phoebe that this is the Church's teaching.



#8 Kosta

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Posted 16 February 2014 - 02:15 AM

So, would I be understanding correctly if I said that Christ's human body was made in the image and likeness of His own divinity? That is fascinating to consider deeply. Also, the glorified body is a transfigured existence, but the relationship to God in terms of image remains, only the likeness is more amplified, yes? Does Christ's body, since He is sinless throughout the incarnation, grow in likeness after His resurrection, or is it already fully in the likeness as well as image of God?


After the ressurection it simply was transfigured to transcend the fall, this he no longer hungered, no longer got sick, no longer died. And his body was made in the image and likeness of His own hypostasis. In icons of the 7 day creation, Christ looks identical to Adam.

#9 Rdr Andreas

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Posted 16 February 2014 - 12:05 PM

I'm not sure this is accurate.

 

Panagiotis Trembelas:


Since the Lord was sent by His Father to the world to raise the fallen human nature, reconstituting it as another ancestor and new Adam, it was natural for Him to assume the human nature, which “Adam received sinless at the first creation,” so that that nature which the first Adam threw to “corruption and death,” the Lord raised “sinless according to nature.” Therefore the Lord did not assume another human nature, different from the one that came out of the hands of the Creator, but the self same one carried by us, save healthy, and not one corrupted or rendered sick by sin, which reveals Him perfect man, precisely as the first Adam was in Paradise before falling into transgression.

 

Metropolitan Hierotheos:


Christ’s conception in the womb of the Theotokos took place creatively through the Holy Spirit and not by seed, because Christ had to assume the pure nature that Adam had before his transgression.







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