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Flooding in Balkans are Divine retribution, say Orthodox Church leaders


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#1 Christophoros

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Posted 22 May 2014 - 09:08 PM

Conchita Wurst caused Balkan floods after Eurovision win, say church leaders

 

By Our Foreign Staff

6:33PM BST 22 May 2014

 

 

Conchita Wurst is responsible for flooding that left over 50 people dead earlier this month, church leaders in the Balkans have claimed.

The Austrian drag artist, whose real name is Thomas Neuwirth, seized international attention after winning Eurovision 2014 with his hit Rise Like a Phoenix.

 

However, several church leaders have now claimed the recent devastating flooding across the Balkans, which was the worst in a century and left over 50 people dead, was "divine punishment" for Conchita's victory.

 

"This [flood] is not a coincidence, but a warning," Patriarch Amfilohije of Montenegro said, according to e.novine.com. "God sent the rains as a reminder that people should not join the wild side."

 

 Patriarch Irinej, the spiritual leader of Eastern Orthodox Serbs, reportedly said the floods were "divine punishment for their vices" and that "God is thus washing Serbia of its sins".

 

The Russian Orthodox Church has previously described Conchita as an "abomination" and that his victory was "one more step in the rejection of the Christian identity of European culture".

 

Speaking about her look on the Graham Norton Show, Conchita said: "It's my own truth. It makes me comfortable on stage. I love myself and the bearded lady is fun and expresses everything I feel."

 

The Balkan flooding caused widespread devastation, forcing almost 150,000 people from their homes.

 

Towns and villages in Serbia, Bosnia and Croatia have been swamped, homes have been swept away by landslides, electricity has been cut off and vast tracts of farmland remain under water.

 

http://www.telegraph...ch-leaders.html

 



#2 Rdr Andreas

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Posted 23 May 2014 - 03:55 PM

Are we supposed to accept these statements? Why should Orthodox people in the Balkans suffer for what an Austrian did in Denmark?



#3 Alex I

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Posted 24 May 2014 - 12:47 AM

The exact quote from novine website is this (just use Google Translate) 
This is not a coincidence, this is a warning, but it is obvious that God still loves you as soon as we send such notice, such as Serbia and sent as floods, among other things, remind people that can not through wilderness " .

 

By heavily editing this quote, omitting "God still loves you" tabloid  Telegraph changes entire message of Patriarch Amfilohije. And there is no direct link to Conchita!!!
As for Patriarch Irinej, it says "reportedtly" so I have absolutely no idea what exactly Patriarch said.

 

I think this article just trying to discredit Orthodox church.



#4 Effie Ganatsios

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Posted 24 May 2014 - 08:37 AM

I totally agree with Andreas. God has given us free will. As far as I know the people did not vote for this singer. The judges did. Whether they wanted to send some kind of message to the people of Europe is not important. But, to say that the flooding and the dreadful death-toll is because of this, does not make any sense.

#5 Rdr Andreas

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Posted 24 May 2014 - 05:07 PM

It is true that one should be careful of any newspaper report, even in the Daily Telegraph. This is, after all, the paper that reported in 2003 that there was a 'killer icon' in the Hermitage in St Petersburg which had caused the deaths of several people by its 'force field'. The icon described was and is, in fact, the icon of Christ by St Andrei Rublev in the State Tretyakov Gallery in Moscow!

 

We know that sin has a cosmic effect but for anyone to see causation - if, indeed, anyone has - between the antics of the bearded 'lady' in Copenhagen and the Balkan floods would be going too far.



#6 Phoebe K.

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Posted 24 May 2014 - 07:33 PM

The only response to the situation is that our Lord said in Luke Chapter 13,

 

"Or those eighteen who were killed when the tower of Siloam fell on them—do you think that they were worse offenders than all the others living in Jerusalem?  No, I tell you; but unless you repent, you will all perish just as they did."

 

I refuse to pass judgement on the situation, rather to pray for all to come to the knowledge of God, that is all we can do, the rest is the Lord's to do.  

 

Preaching and proclaiming the Word to the world will not work, especially if we follow the west in talking of the vengeful God.  If we live it with the consultancy and love which our forefathers did we will draw people to the truth as he sines through our lives.

 

Phoebe 



#7 Rdr Andreas

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Posted 25 May 2014 - 06:22 PM

Phoebe's quote from scripture is, course, very apt. It does make the point that disasters are not visited upon people because of their sins, that is, those people's sins. Disasters may indeed be instructive: the Blessed Theophylact says that the deaths of those killed by the collapse of the tower of Siloam can be seen as presaging the destruction of the whole city of Jerusalem in 70AD. Natural disasters should remind us of the transient nature of this life and how it can be cut off at any time, unexpectedly.

 

I think it might be good to widen this discussion to consider the nature of disasters and catastrophes, and whether God is given to retribution, requital, and vengeance. The OT has many references to smiting but it is trite theology that the fearsome Jehovah of the OT is not the complete picture of God since God is revealed to us in the NT where He is shown to be merciful in ways not envisaged in the OT. I think St Isaac the Syrian writes about this but many other Fathers must have commented on the issue.



#8 Ben Johnson

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Posted 25 May 2014 - 07:37 PM

"But I say to you, love
your enemies and pray for those who persecute you,
 so that you may be sons
of your Father who is in heaven; for He causes His sun to rise on the evil and the good, and sends rain on the righteous and the
unrighteous.
For ifyou love those who love you, what reward do you have? Do not even the tax
collectors do the same
?
" -- Matthew 5:44-46, NASB



#9 Anton S.

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Posted 23 January 2015 - 10:50 AM


 


 Natural disasters should remind us of the transient nature of this life and how it can be cut off at any time, unexpectedly.

 

 

I cannot agree more. I would add that not only natural, but also man-made disasters can be very educational. When I was 9, the house, in which our family lived, was destroyed by a gas explosion and subsequent fire with almost everything we possessed. This event set me thinking about the fragility of our earthly life and possessions, I began to look for something immutable, something eternal to rely on. It helped me very much to renounce my atheist upbringing, to see the futility of materialism and to come to the Church (12 years later).

 

I hope that some of the victims of these horrible floods have benefitted from their misfortune in a similar way.






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