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Sunday Antiphons for Greek/Antiochian use

sunday divine liturgy antiphons greek

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#1 Anthony Cornett

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Posted 02 December 2014 - 06:14 PM

I am helping put together an English-language Divine Liturgy book for our Greek parish and am looking to consult other American sources on common proper practice. For Sunday Divine Liturgy in parishes that don’t follow the Typica/Beatitudes, the 3rd Antiphon seems to be an elusive mystery as to how it is properly handled. Fr. Konstantinos Papagianni has a proposed formula in his Systema Typikou and Handbook for Readers and Chanters, but I’m not sure if it is necessarily adopted elsewhere. The Violakis Tyikon doesn’t even offer options outside of the Beatitudes and Typica for Sundays. The following is what I gleaned from Papagianni:
 

 

 

 

THIRD ANTIPHON

 

Mode of the Week. Psalm 117.
 
Verse:  O give thanks unto the Lord, for He is good, for His mercy endures forever.
 
Resurrectional Apolytikion in the Mode of the Week.
 
Verse:  Let all that fear the Lord now say that He is good, for His mercy endures for ever.
 
Resurrectional Apolytikion.
 
Verse:  This is the day which the Lord has made; let us rejoice and be glad in it.
 
Resurrectional Apolytikion.

 

 
Is this followed by any American parishes to your knowledge? The model we currently follow, and I am unsure as to where it was gleaned, only has 2 recitations of the Resurrectional Apolytikion, then the Entrance, followed by the 3rd instance. I believe Papagianni’s argument is that it is a shame if the Apolytikion is only chanted once, and perhaps 2 times with a 3rd after the entrance covers this a bit. 
 
Most English-language books simply tell the reader to use the assigned hymns with no direction as to how the Antiphons are supposed to be performed. 
 
Thanks for any insight and/or direction,
Anthony

 


Edited by Anthony Cornett, 02 December 2014 - 06:27 PM.


#2 Rdr Andreas

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Posted 02 December 2014 - 06:34 PM

I didn't know there were places where the Third Antiphon wasn't the Beatitudes. And I serve in an Antiochian parish.



#3 Anthony Cornett

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Posted 02 December 2014 - 06:37 PM

I didn't know there were places where the Third Antiphon wasn't the Beatitudes. And I serve in an Antiochian parish.

 

That place is the vast (insert word)land of America ;)



#4 Rdr Daniel (R.)

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Posted 02 December 2014 - 07:32 PM

Dear Antony Cornett,

 

I'm not in the U.S.A. but the method you have in your first post from Fr. Konstantinos Papagianni is what is in the official liturgy book of Thyateira and Great Britain, and what I think is used in our parish though I'm concentrating on forming the procession at that point so I unfortunately don't take take much heed of what the choir are doing. Following the procession we then sing the troparia of the day, the troparia of the patrons of the church, and then the clergy sing the seasonal kontakion. We do use the Beatitudes during Great Lent but not outwith it.

 

In Christ.

Daniel,


Edited by Daniel R., 02 December 2014 - 07:35 PM.


#5 Rdr Andreas

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Posted 02 December 2014 - 09:50 PM

Probably I'm only used to the Russian tradition which we use.



#6 Dcn Alexander Haig

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Posted 02 December 2014 - 09:52 PM

Most Greek parishes I have attended will only sing the Apolytikion once for the Third Antiphon: occasionally it is prefaced by the third of those verses but not always.  This tradition is odd as it means the right choir sing the apolytikion twice while the left not at all.  I suspect, however, a wide variety of usages exist.

 

In Xp

Alexander







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