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Story about two monks and a woman at a river.


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#21 Ryan

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Posted 15 March 2015 - 09:34 PM

Great cultures are based on Myths. Modern man fails to understand this. We think that bible is based on "reality".

But ask a modern man to write a book about his father and he will write a book full of myths. We realize reality through a filter that makes our truth to be based on our conceptions rather than actual facts.

Then, reality is shocking untrustworthy and myths are the foundations of culture.

 

I would go one further and say that people who try to live in a world of bare "fact" are also mythologizers.



#22 Rahul-IN

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Posted 17 March 2015 - 12:57 AM

There is no monastic vow to never touch a person of the opposite sex in Orthodoxy, which is the first thing that stood out to me.

 

No. But it is in the Orthodox heritage. It's been a long time since I read the Desert Fathers, but if I recall right, some of their sayings were quite strict.



#23 Paul C

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Posted 18 March 2015 - 07:35 AM

I heard back from the podcaster today.  She said she actually did not find it directly in the Desert Fathers, but heard it from "a priest, many years ago"  who said it was from the Desert Fathers.  After I contacted her about it, she said she looked into it and could not locate any Christian source for the story and proposes that it must simply have been adopted by the priest she spoke to as a teaching story.  It is definitely a Buddhist parable, with no authorship or derivation within the Fathers of the Church (no Church Father "stole" it from a Buddhist source, as no Church Father mentions it).  Some modern Roman Catholic online popular spirituality sources seem to have "borrowed" it, which may explain its results when searching for the story within Christian traditions.

 

That being said, what should we do with it and other such stories that might have a beneficial lesson behind them?  Here we find lessons about not judging our brothers, about following the "spirit" rather than the "letter" of the law, about not focusing on the past but on the present, etc.  St. Basil the Great says we should be like the bees and collect nectar where we find it...



#24 Niko Barounis

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Posted 18 March 2015 - 10:45 PM

I heard back from the podcaster today.  She said she actually did not find it directly in the Desert Fathers, but heard it from "a priest, many years ago"  who said it was from the Desert Fathers.  After I contacted her about it, she said she looked into it and could not locate any Christian source for the story and proposes that it must simply have been adopted by the priest she spoke to as a teaching story.  It is definitely a Buddhist parable, with no authorship or derivation within the Fathers of the Church (no Church Father "stole" it from a Buddhist source, as no Church Father mentions it).  Some modern Roman Catholic online popular spirituality sources seem to have "borrowed" it, which may explain its results when searching for the story within Christian traditions.

 

That being said, what should we do with it and other such stories that might have a beneficial lesson behind them?  Here we find lessons about not judging our brothers, about following the "spirit" rather than the "letter" of the law, about not focusing on the past but on the present, etc.  St. Basil the Great says we should be like the bees and collect nectar where we find it...

 

Well thats GREAT to know!!! That it was not stolen i mean.

 

as to what should we do with it: We learn from it and apply it to our lives. just cause its a Budhist parable does ot make it evil! Budhhist stories/parables have soo many great teaching stories that DO fit in with Orthodoxy.



#25 Kosta

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Posted 19 March 2015 - 01:31 AM

It shouldn't be credited as a story of christian origins. Instead it can be used as a supplement to the gospel story of "who is our neigbor", and that leniency and eikonomia is permissible when its meant to help our fellow man.




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