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40-day churching, Altar entrance


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#41 Rdr Andreas

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Posted 15 July 2015 - 07:03 AM

The video clip in post #39 shows the kind of pulpit/amvon which exists in some Greek and Cypriot churches; I have not seen them in Russia. Such an amvon is the early amvon which was in the centre of the nave moved to the north side, and often attached to a pillar and reached by a long steep ladder. These, where they exist - and many churches do not have them, are nowadays rarely used. The presiding celebrant may instruct the deacon to use it on some special occasion as for the hierarchical divine liturgy in the video. I have seen this kind of pulpit/amvon used only once, in a church in Omodhos, Cyprus when the senior priest instructed a young deacon to mount the long, steep ladder to the pulpit/amvon to read the Gospel, purely as a sort of testing of the poor young man. Climbing a long steep ladder in vestments and carrying the Gospel book would be no easy matter! So, the amvon these days means the semi-circular feature in front of the Royal Doors as the photos in posts #36 and #40 show. By the way, the smaller photos can be enlarged by clicking on them. As Olga has said, the arrangement of the iconostasis, solea and amvon are the same in Greece, Cyprus and Russia, the only variations being in the number of steps and sometimes the railing off of the solea (which is usual in Russia). Greeks and Cypriots commonly go to kiss the icons on the iconostasis. In Russia this is not done, hence the railing on the solea; icons for veneration by the faithful are placed on stands in the nave.



#42 Olga

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Posted 15 July 2015 - 08:29 AM

 As Olga has said, the arrangement of the iconostasis, solea and amvon are the same in Greece, Cyprus and Russia,

 

.... and this arrangement is the same for other Orthodox churches I have attended, such as Antiochian, Belorussian, Serbian, and others.

 

 

 the only variations being in the number of steps and sometimes the railing off of the solea (which is usual in Russia). Greeks and Cypriots commonly go to kiss the icons on the iconostasis. In Russia this is not done, hence the railing on the solea; icons for veneration by the faithful are placed on stands in the nave.

 

There are indeed such railings in some Greek churches I have attended, though they are not common.






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