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During Divine Liturgy, should I light candles for heterodox people ?


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#1 hailton

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Posted 22 May 2016 - 05:27 PM

During Divine Liturgy, should I light candles for an heterodox who is still alive ?? (1)

 

Should I light candles for an heterodox who is already dead during Divine Liturgy ??? (2)

 

I know that the Church does not offer public prayer for departed non-believers. But what about silent mental prayer during Divine Liturgy ??

Should I mentally pray for dead heterodox people during Divine Liturgy ??? (3)

 

Many thanks to all of you.


Edited by hailton, 22 May 2016 - 05:38 PM.


#2 Lakis Papas

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Posted 22 May 2016 - 07:58 PM

Praying for non orthodox is allowed, but the Divine Liturgy is only for members of Church, that is only for Orthodox. Among other reasons, this is also for respecting non-orthodox's freedom to remain non-orthodox.

God respects freedom of non-orthodox, so we also do the same. For if we bring them into Devine Liturgy against their expressed will, we offer no service to them.

#3 John S.

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Posted 23 May 2016 - 03:16 PM

Praying for non orthodox is allowed, but the Divine Liturgy is only for members of Church, that is only for Orthodox. Among other reasons, this is also for respecting non-orthodox's freedom to remain non-orthodox.

God respects freedom of non-orthodox, so we also do the same. For if we bring them into Devine Liturgy against their expressed will, we offer no service to them.

 

Oh?

 

"Priest: Among the first, remember, O Lord, his Beatitude, Metropolitan ______, his Grace, our Bishop ______, and grant them to Your holy church in peace, safety, honor, and health, and many years rightly teaching the word of Your truth.
People:    And all mankind."

 

Or how about:

 

"Deacon:    For the President and all civil authorities of this country, and for those serving in its Armed Forces, let us pray to the Lord.
People:    Lord, have mercy."

 

And as far as respecting others' freedom: I really don't see what that has to do with not praying for them in the liturgy?


Edited by John S., 23 May 2016 - 03:29 PM.


#4 Rdr Andreas

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Posted 23 May 2016 - 07:33 PM

There is a difference between praying for non-Orthodox in the liturgy and commemorating them in the proskomidi. God wants all men to be saved and come to the knowledge of the truth (1 Timothy 2:4). Indeed, this is stated many times in the OT as well as the NT. So, the Divine Liturgy is offered for all mankind. But the crucial word there is 'offered' - what is offered has to be accepted, and all mankind does not accept what is offered. Nevertheless, we pray, in the Lord's Prayer, 'Thy will be done', and so we pray for all mankind because we want God's will to be done.

 

As to non-Orthodox rulers such as HM The Queen and the American president, they are 'God's servants' (Romans 13:6) and we pray for them and honour them (cf 1 Peter:2:18) and those in authority that they may govern well.

 

With regard to individual non-Orthodox of our knowledge - relatives and friends - these are included in the petitions for all mankind but they may not be commemorated in the proskomidi.



#5 Father David Moser

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Posted 23 May 2016 - 08:03 PM

Candles represent your personal prayers that you bring to the Divine Liturgy - therefore they can be lit for anyone, Orthodox or not.  One should not ask the priest to commemorate, either in the proskomedia or in the petitions of the litanies, non-Orthodox people as these are prayers that are corporate or "public".  Outside the liturgy, one can ask for a molieben to be served for a living non-Orthodox person as they still have the opportunity to embrace the true faith and so we can and should pray for them in this manner.  One cannot ask for a pannykhida/memorial service for the non-Orthodox departed as they have already made their choice in this life and are therefore constrained within that choice until the general Resurrection (what happens at the Great Judgement is up to God, of course).  Of course in our private prayers in one's cell (home), in accordance with the direction of many spiritual fathers and elders, we can pray as it seems appropriate.

 

Fr David



#6 Christophoros

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Posted 29 May 2016 - 01:20 PM

What about the Canon of St. Varus, which specifically calls for the commemoration of non-Orthodox? Can this be celebrated publicly in the Church? Here is the service posted of the website of St. Vladimir's Church (ROCOR) in Michigan:

 

http://www.stvladimi...anonstvarus.pdf






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