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Were the 418 Council of Carthage's canons ratified at Ephesus?


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#1 David Wolf

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Posted 12 August 2016 - 01:54 AM

I've seen numerous statements like this one online:

 

Pelagian theology was condemned in 418 at the Council of Carthage, and these condemnations were ratified at the Council of Ephesus in 431.

 

But I can't find any confirmation of that in the records of the Council of Ephesus I've studied. Is it true?



#2 Anna Stickles

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Posted 13 August 2016 - 01:00 PM

I found an explanation here. . This may seem kind of shaky compared to the logic we are used to, but there  is a lot of overlap between the Pelagian and Nestorian heresies, they are of a family so to speak. So while Pelagianism wasn't mentioned directly, in essence the statement I believe is true. At the Quintisex council we see in Canon 1 an affirmation of the previous ecumenical councils, and in Canon 2 a list of secondary councils and documents that are to be considered authoritative and among these is the Council at Carthage although exactly which council is not mentioned.
I've never looked at this list in detail, it would be interesting to do.


Edited by Anna Stickles, 13 August 2016 - 01:03 PM.


#3 Kosta

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Posted 13 August 2016 - 02:32 PM

The decisions of Carthage were not ratified at the council of Ephesus in 431 as they had not even been translated into greek till much later. The Father's of Ephesus had no idea what canons passed in Carthage.
What Ephesus did condemn in Canons 1 & 4 was the teachings of Celestius. Celestius followed an (extreme) version of Pelagianism. As Anna points out certain elements between nestorianism and pelagianism overlapped as written about St. John Cassian.




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