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What should I do if my priest is going to commemorate the dead at the Divine Liturgy on sunday ?


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#1 hailton

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Posted 10 February 2017 - 04:36 AM

I know that the canons and the great Kollyvades Fathers teach us that is preferable to avoid commemorating the dead on Sunday.

 
I am thinking of asking my priest for a blessing to always leave the Divine Liturgy early (before the end) when the departed is going to be commemorated on sunday.
 
I love my priest, but I fear that I will be responsable for disobeying the canons if I stay until the end.
 
Another doubt: at the third day after death, a memorial service is performed for the dead. What should a priest do if the third day after death fell on a sunday ???
 
Many thanks.

Edited by hailton, 10 February 2017 - 04:37 AM.


#2 Rdr Andreas

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Posted 10 February 2017 - 11:03 AM

From what very little I know, the concerns of the Kollyvades Fathers centred around combatting western influence which was and is admirable. It seems their preference for avoiding memorial services on Sundays was a minor part of their movement, and can hardly be part of their struggle against western influence since the western Christian communities do not serve such memorials anyway. So far as I know, this aspect of the Kollyvades movement is not binding. The serving of memorial services after the Sunday Divine Liturgy is pretty much universal in the Greek Churches though not, in my experience, in Russia. More generally, if we are aware of things done by our priest which are at variance with accepted practice (for example commemorating non-Orthodox on the diskos) but which do not go to matters of doctrine or morals, we pass over them.



#3 Olga

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Posted 10 February 2017 - 01:06 PM

The serving of memorial services after the Sunday Divine Liturgy is pretty much universal in the Greek Churches though not, in my experience, in Russia.

 

Quite true about Greek practice. In Russian churches outside of Russia, though, Sunday commemorations, do occur from time to time. These would be held after the end of the Divine Liturgy, not inserted towards the end of it as happens in Greek practice.

 

The only "prohibition" I've encountered on Sunday services for the departed is for funerals, not memorials. I do not know whether this is because of any canons, or simply longstanding custom.



#4 Rdr Andreas

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Posted 10 February 2017 - 02:39 PM

The departed may be commemorated on the diskos at the Sunday Divine Liturgy so I cannot see why a panikhida could not be served on Sunday after the Divine Liturgy. There are, of course, the special Memorial Saturdays the Church has designated for commemoration of the faithful departed.



#5 Lakis Papas

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Posted 10 February 2017 - 06:38 PM

 
I love my priest, but I fear that I will be responsable for disobeying the canons if I stay until the end.

 

It is best to obey to the priest and let him be accountable, if he is doing something wrong. When you follow priest's ways you have no responsibility for any faults that he may commit.



#6 Rdr Andreas

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Posted 10 February 2017 - 08:57 PM

I respectfully agree with Lakis: members of a congregation cannot be held to account for the actions of their priest, save as already said (regarding matters of doctrine and morals).



#7 Olga

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Posted 11 February 2017 - 04:55 AM

It is also worth remembering that funerals during the week after Easter are permitted.

 

Bright Week, like Pascha, is the most liturgically joyous time of the year, and this joy extends even to the funeral service. A Bright Week funeral is a very different service to the usual one. It is a condensed version of the Paschal services, with only small amounts of the standard funeral service used. Death has indeed been trampled down. :)



#8 Rdr Andreas

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Posted 11 February 2017 - 09:07 AM

I have noted this before but it perhaps bears repeating here: there is a belief in Russia (though how much it is sanctioned by the Church I do not know) that the souls of those who depart during Bright Week are saved because those in the heavens cannot bear the thought of a soul being lost at this most joyous time. Certainly, my wife and her family were greatly relieved that an uncle passed away on Bright Tuesday.



#9 Olga

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Posted 11 February 2017 - 01:09 PM

I have noted this before but it perhaps bears repeating here: there is a belief in Russia (though how much it is sanctioned by the Church I do not know) that the souls of those who depart during Bright Week are saved because those in the heavens cannot bear the thought of a soul being lost at this most joyous time. Certainly, my wife and her family were greatly relieved that an uncle passed away on Bright Tuesday.

 

This belief is not only found among Russians. Greeks and others also speak of it. It is also said that to die on Pascha itself is the greatest blessing.






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