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Greek vs. Slavic "reading"


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#1 Rdr. Elias

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Posted 19 May 2017 - 11:41 PM

I'm curious if anyone has information about the difference in the reading approaches between the Greek and Slavic traditions. I grew up in Antiochian and Greek parishes, but lived in a Slavic style monastery for a few years. So, I've been at the kliros for both styles.

 

In the Slavic style, nothing is ever just plain read, but it is often in the Greek tradition. I want to say this happened even on Athos. The rubrics in the Antiochian services even explicitly say "plain read." As a non-musical reader, I rarely intone (when needed, I can do a sort of midway between simple intoning and actual chanting, but not real chanting...I'm hoping to change that if I can figure out how to learn to sing). Usually if our chanters aren't there or if they need help (i.e. Agape Vespers is rough for them our protopsalti). 

 

Anyway, just curious if anyone knows why the difference. Thanks!



#2 Rdr Andreas

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Posted 21 May 2017 - 09:23 PM

I'm not knowledgeable about these things but the main difference I notice when I'm in Russia is the reading of the Epistle in ascending notes. Can't say I like it that much.



#3 Algernon

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Posted 15 June 2017 - 01:48 AM

I'm not knowledgeable about these things but the main difference I notice when I'm in Russia is the reading of the Epistle in ascending notes. Can't say I like it that much.

I don't like it either. It seems too showy.



#4 Olga

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Posted 15 June 2017 - 11:25 PM

I don't like it either. It seems too showy.

 

If it's showy, it's not being done right. It should not draw attention to the reader, but to the words. When done properly, it is no more theatrical than other styles of chant, and often less so. Many a Greek-style chant, with its drawn-out syllables, melismata and fluctuating pitch, is far more ornate and showy than a well-executed, disciplined stepped pitch.

 

The point is that any style of reading must be done in a manner where it does not detract from what is read or chanted. It should not be a performance.


 






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