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Bells during the Magnificat


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#1 Algernon

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Posted 15 June 2017 - 10:06 AM

I read on the Blagovest Bells website that "During the Magnificat the bell is struck nine times."

​Why nine? Is it because it's the ninth ode or is there another reason?

 

Thanks,

​A



#2 Algernon

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Posted 17 June 2017 - 10:49 PM

Okay, so no one knows the answer to this either, I guess...?



#3 Olga

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Posted 17 June 2017 - 11:28 PM

Which service are you referring to? Both Matins (most of the time) and the DL feature a magnificat to the Mother of God.



#4 Algernon

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Posted 18 June 2017 - 08:06 AM

Matins.

I wasn't aware that the DL had the Magnificat, too.



#5 Olga

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Posted 18 June 2017 - 10:43 PM

The hymn to the Mother of God after the Eucharistic canon (the most commonly-sung being "It is meet") is also known as a magnificat (megalynarion). Hence my question.

 

Regarding the ringing of bells during either of these times: in my long experience of both Greek and Russian liturgical practice, the only time I've heard bells being rung is during the DL magnificat, and that only in Russian churches, not Greek. The bell-ringing was not a single note tolled nine times, but a melodic peal using several bells.



#6 Rdr Andreas

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Posted 24 June 2017 - 07:17 AM

I have come across a Greek custom of ringing a bell - no specific number of times - at the start of the great doxology at the conclusion of matins when that is followed by the DL. Is this related to the question, and in any case, why is this done?



#7 Olga

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Posted 24 June 2017 - 11:25 PM

This is only a guess, but perhaps it is a heralding of the DL which follows the doxology. I have come across a similar Russian custom of bell-ringing as the Hours are ending, before the liturgy begins.



#8 Rdr Andreas

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Posted 25 June 2017 - 05:39 PM

Thank you, Olga. I have not heard in Russia any bell ringing (inside church) at any point in any service though, of course, the external church bells are rung though exactly at what point I am not sure.



#9 Brian Rowlands

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Posted 01 July 2017 - 05:31 PM

On Saturday 1st July/18th June 2017 the Russian TV channel 'Soyuz' broadcast the All Night Vigil service live from the church of the Nativity of Saint John the Forerunner in Yukki (Leningrad Oblast, about 12 miles north of Saint Petersburg).  

 

This church has two bells inside, close to the ends of the iconostas, next to the chanters' stands (look next to the banners).   At matins, during the singing of the Song of the Mother of God ('Magnificat'), at the beginning of the ninth ode of the canon, one of these bells was struck nine times by one of the men singing, as the priest censed around the church.   The second screenshot posted here just captured the bell being struck.

 

For anyone interested, a video recording of the entire service might appear on the tvsoyuz channel on Youtube - the regular Saturday and Sunday (and festal) broadcasts seem to appear there a few days after their live transmission.

Attached Files


Edited by Brian Rowlands, 01 July 2017 - 05:33 PM.





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