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Is this icon canonical?


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#1 Algernon

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Posted 22 October 2017 - 11:35 PM

Helllo. Can someone tell me if this icon--and similar icons of Christ depicted as the Creator--are acceptible in the Church? I like it, but I'm not sure it is in keeping with our faith.

Thanks

A

 

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#2 Olga

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Posted 23 October 2017 - 06:30 AM

The general composition of the icon is canonical. However, it would have been better if God the Word was dressed in white or gold, as is seen in canonical icons of the Ancient of Days, or of Christ in Majesty, where He is sitting on His heavenly throne, surrounded by uncreated light and seraphim and cherubim.

 

The red and blue garments speak of the Incarnation. While icons are supposed to transcend time as we know it, the red and blue garments in this case could be a source of confusion.



#3 Algernon

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Posted 23 October 2017 - 08:21 AM

Thank you, Olga. What I am really getting at though is whether or not it is correct to depict Christ as the creator. Our Creed clearly states that God the Father is the "Creator of heaven and earth and of all things visible and invisible," not God the Son. So, why would Christ be shown as the creator?

 

Thanks,

A



#4 Olga

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Posted 23 October 2017 - 09:17 AM

Following the passage you quoted, the Creed clearly states:
 
And in one Lord Jesus Christ, the only-begotten Son of God, begotten of the Father, Light of Light, true God of true God, begotten, not made, being of one essence with the Father, by whom all things were made. This verse is about Christ, so the "by whom" is Christ.


Moreover, Christ is frequently referred to liturgically as Creator, most notably in hymns to the Mother of God which express the mystery and paradox of her, a created being, conceiving, giving birth, and nursing and nurturing her Creator and God.

 





 



#5 Rdr Andreas

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Posted 23 October 2017 - 05:27 PM

Just to add that the Second Person of the Holy Trinity is the Word (John 1:1) and the Creation account in Genesis I repeatedly has, 'And God said . . . ', and so God the Word  - Christ - executed Creation. The depiction of angels could be a reference to Job 38:7, and Colossians 1:13-16 affirms that Christ is He by Whom all things were made.



#6 Algernon

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Posted 23 October 2017 - 09:19 PM

Great, thanks!



#7 Ben Johnson

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Posted 25 October 2017 - 01:46 AM

It looks like the Lord is dressed in blue to create the sky and dressed in red to create the earth.  The icon looks fine to me.



#8 Olga

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Posted 25 October 2017 - 09:25 PM

The red and blue of Christ's garments in conventional icons of His have a specific, incarnational meaning: The King and God (red tunic) is clothed in humanity (blue cloak). This meaning also explains the colours of the garments of the Mother of God, which are the reverse of His: the human and mortal woman (blue tunic) is graced by God (red maphorion) in conceiving and bearing God Incarnate.



#9 Ben Johnson

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Posted 26 October 2017 - 02:55 AM

The red and blue of Christ's garments in conventional icons of His have a specific, incarnational meaning: The King and God (red tunic) is clothed in humanity (blue cloak). This meaning also explains the colours of the garments of the Mother of God, which are the reverse of His: the human and mortal woman (blue tunic) is graced by God (red maphorion) in conceiving and bearing God Incarnate.

But is there a rule that says that the colors must have an incarnational meaning? :unsure:


Edited by Ben Johnson, 26 October 2017 - 02:56 AM.


#10 Olga

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Posted 26 October 2017 - 05:30 AM

Icons, at their heart, proclaim the Incarnation of God. :)






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