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What we are giving up for Lent


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#41 Effie Ganatsios

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Posted 08 March 2009 - 08:25 AM

I can say for sure the opposite of this statement is true on this side of the pond.


Paul, what do you mean?

re BBQ's.................... shrimps are Lenten fare and very, very tasty when bbq'ed...................

Today I made a Greek ratatouille. In Greek this dish is called tourli which means a bit of everything. In the past housewives were very frugal and anything left over during the week - excluding animal products - was added to this dish. It is easy and very tasty. Saute onions and garlic with parsley until onion is transparent, and then add all the other ingredients one by one, all nicely cubed..... stirring constantly. The tomatoes will add their juice so you don't need to add any liquid. Simmer until cooked then put the cooked mixture into small, individual clay oven pots and then bake. When not fasting a bechamel cream topping can be added.

I used a little olive oil to saute the vegetables, but you can use plain water if you are fasting from oil.

Effie

#42 Paul Cowan

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Posted 08 March 2009 - 08:44 PM

Paul, what do you mean?

re BBQ's.................... shrimps are Lenten fare and very, very tasty when bbq'ed...................

Effie


I don't know whether the fact that most people fast here makes fasting easier. I suspect it does.


What I meant was, over here; "nobody" (as in Americans in general) fasts, so it is harder for us to fast.

I went to a work meeting last night and everyone was polite and said the sodas were "over there" since they know I don't drink. When they started eating, I had to politely decline and got many jaw opening stares and actually left so I would not cause a scene to the host. Besides, the smell of alcohol was making me sick.

Its easier just to remove myself from tempttion than try to explain the "whys' of it all.

Paul

#43 Stephen Wendland

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Posted 08 March 2009 - 09:08 PM

Paul, I have always heard that when we, as Orthodox are invited to someones house (or in this case an office), it is proper to take what is given without making a scene. I can understand refraining from alcohol, if you don't drink. I have had people at work ask me if I was a vegetarian before and I simply replied, sometimes. I let them guess to as the reasons. Today many people have all kinds of weird diets and eating patterns, that no one really seems to care or take much notice. Some of my co-workers eat popcorn only for lunch (they must go home and gorge themselves). I don't really speak to anyone about fasting for spiritual reasons. It makes little sense to the modern mind. I have found that there is almost always something at an office party or meeting that follows fasting guidelines. If not I would much rather eat than be accused of being rude or proud. In this case you could eat a smaller portion than you normally would. Of course check with your priest but I have again never heard anything other than this.

#44 Kseniya M.

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Posted 08 March 2009 - 09:16 PM

What I meant was, over here; "nobody" (as in Americans in general) fasts, so it is harder for us to fast.


Plus, Americans in general have NO clue what Orthodox fasting entails. To be fair, it's not like we've educated the American public about it. They think fasting means either 1) the old Catholic fish on Friday thing, or 2) some kind eastern total fast on water thing.

When I was an Episcopalian, we were exhorted to give up sin for Lent. Even at the time, my reaction was, But we're supposed to do that anyway...

Paul, I have always heard that when we, as Orthodox are invited to someones house (or in this case an office), it is proper to take what is given without making a scene.


St. Paul says (I don't know where in the epistles, but it's there) to eat what is set before us. I've known too many converts who make an issue of food and end up alienating their non-Orthodox families. When we travel to my in-laws, we never press for my husband's parents to accommodate our fasting practices. It's not fair.

On topic -- um. I'm deliriously happy today, so I just decided that I'm giving up being dour and solemn for Lent!

Kseniya the Madly Happy

Edited by Kseniya M., 08 March 2009 - 09:21 PM.
added response to Stephen


#45 JoAnn K. Prater

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Posted 09 March 2009 - 07:19 AM

This is my first Great Lent...I gave up all meat for Lent, for my fast. I'd heard it said that it is better to start like this if you are a newbie to the fast, and then build it as time goes by, if you can. So far, so good. It reminds me every day what the season is, what it means, and why we are here.

Joanna

#46 Jean-Serge

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Posted 12 June 2013 - 03:01 PM

I would like to complete some indications provided:

 

- when a meal a day is allowed, it is to take place after 3 PM (9th hour); the same for fasting on Wednesday and Friday fast when no oil is allowed

 

- during some feasts of Great Lent, like the martyrs of Sebasta, oil maybe eaten, which also entails 2 meal a day

 

- after much research on the subject, I've reached the conclusion that eating shellfish, shrimps etc is far for ideal: Balsamon and Saint Nikodemos of the Holy Mountain say so. An explanation is that fasting is going back to the state Adam had in paradise when he did not eat animals (which was only allowed after the flood). So we should refrain from any animals, even with cold blood, and from anything that has been killed. 

 

These are in fact the ideal targets. Some can reach them at the first shot, for others in takes more time but they remain the targets for anyone As a priest told me, one should to his best, without lying.

 

The hardest thing for me, are I think:

- eating after 3 PM particularly at work because you don't have time to have a break then; even if in Spain 3 PM is the normal time to eat

- eating once a day : one meal is OK but I still need to eat many fruits in the evening

- the 3 strict fast days opening Lent

 

At the opposite, spending a whole day without eating and drinking at all is manageable, and during fasting seasons the envy of meat, cakes, milk, fish and so on simply goes away.

 

Practically speaking, while eating out of home, the main problem is to find meals without oil. The vegan offer is quite large but the without oil option is a bit difficult in stores or restaurants.

 

When invited by people during lent... well, I don't accept invitations during fasting periods by non orthodox. I take the initiative to set in advance the good dates. Moreover we should not visiting so much one another during fasting periods because it is a time for spirituality and not not socializing.






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