Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

'Holy Day of Obligation'?


  • Please log in to reply
8 replies to this topic

#1 Christopher Dombrowski

Christopher Dombrowski

    Regular Poster

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 133 posts

Posted 31 March 2009 - 06:50 AM

Does the EOC have any equivalent of the Roman "Holy Day of Obligation"? Are there any feasts of the Church that lay persons are "expected" to attend on a different level than others?

#2 Father David Moser

Father David Moser

    Moderator

  • Moderators
  • 3,581 posts
  • Orthodox Christian Member
  • Verified Cleric

Posted 31 March 2009 - 01:19 PM

Does the EOC have any equivalent of the Roman "Holy Day of Obligation"? Are there any feasts of the Church that lay persons are "expected" to attend on a different level than others?


No ... and yes. No there is not the same concept of "days of obligation" where if you don't go to Church on that day, you have committed a serious sin. But yes, every day we should be praying together in the Church (that's what daily services are for right?) and so every day is a day of (joyful) obligation. The Apostle did after all instruct us "Pray without ceasing"

Fr David Moser

#3 Anthony Stokes

Anthony Stokes

    Very Frequent Poster

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 413 posts
  • Orthodox Christian Member

Posted 31 March 2009 - 01:55 PM

Does the EOC have any equivalent of the Roman "Holy Day of Obligation"? Are there any feasts of the Church that lay persons are "expected" to attend on a different level than others?


I like Fr. David's reply. There really aren't any days like that. My priest always says that if there is one service that he could require people to attend, it would be Forgiveness Vespers. He also emphasizes participating in at least part of the 12 Great Feasts, and of course Pascha. Plus the parish's feast.

Sbdn. Anthony

#4 Herman Blaydoe

Herman Blaydoe

    Moderator

  • Moderators
  • 4,157 posts
  • Orthodox Christian Member

Posted 31 March 2009 - 02:10 PM

Does the EOC have any equivalent of the Roman "Holy Day of Obligation"? Are there any feasts of the Church that lay persons are "expected" to attend on a different level than others?


No, we don't have a legalistic "obligation", but why miss an opportunity to receive a blessing? I do seem to recall an early canon of the Church that stated something to the effect that any Christian missing more than three consecutive opportunites to receive communion was automatically excommunicated until they went to confession. Beyond the Holy Apostle Paul's admonition to "not forsake the gathering of the brethren" I don't believe we are "obligated" in any way other than love.

Or so it seems to this bear of little brain.

Herman the Pooh

#5 Anthony Stokes

Anthony Stokes

    Very Frequent Poster

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 413 posts
  • Orthodox Christian Member

Posted 31 March 2009 - 09:05 PM

No, we don't have a legalistic "obligation", but why miss an opportunity to receive a blessing? I do seem to recall an early canon of the Church that stated something to the effect that any Christian missing more than three consecutive opportunites to receive communion was automatically excommunicated until they went to confession. Beyond the Holy Apostle Paul's admonition to "not forsake the gathering of the brethren" I don't believe we are "obligated" in any way other than love.

Or so it seems to this bear of little brain.

Herman the Pooh


Herman,
I think it is the 80th canon of the Council of Trullo that you are thinking of, but it is 3 consecutive Sundays, not eucharists.

Canon LXXX.
If any bishop, or presbyter, or deacon, or any of those who are enumerated in the list of the clergy, or a layman, has no very grave necessity nor difficult business so as to keep him from church for a very long time, but being in town does not go to church on three consecutive Sundays—three weeks—if he is a cleric let him be deposed, but if a layman let him be cut off.

This is what I have always been taught.

Sbdn. Anthony

#6 Michael Astley

Michael Astley

    Very Frequent Poster

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 562 posts
  • Orthodox Christian Member

Posted 06 April 2009 - 03:23 PM

I thought I'd share this.

Michael

#7 D. W. Dickens

D. W. Dickens

    Frequent Poster

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 287 posts

Posted 06 April 2009 - 03:53 PM

Canon LXXX.
If any bishop, or presbyter, or deacon, or any of those who are enumerated in the list of the clergy, or a layman, has no very grave necessity nor difficult business so as to keep him from church for a very long time, but being in town does not go to church on three consecutive Sundays—three weeks—if he is a cleric let him be deposed, but if a layman let him be cut off.


While I do not want to endorse and legalistic model, it seems to me that there is a good pastoral point here. Regular attendance (considering reasonable circumstances) seems directly related to participation in the life of the Church. Someone who deliberately removes themselves from that life should expect a process of reintegration (perhaps an obedience or something) both for their own spiritual good and for that of the parish.

I'd prefer to be "prodigal son" about this and just be excited to see them return. I know my own priest likes to err on this side, particularly on feast days, most especially on Pascha where our little parish can have easily 3 times the normal "Sunday" folks, some of which I haven't seen all year.

Perhaps it is best for my salvation to assume I have not seen them because they are visiting relatives in the area for Holy Week.

#8 Bryan J. Maloney

Bryan J. Maloney

    Very Frequent Poster

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 364 posts
  • Orthodox Christian Member

Posted 30 March 2011 - 12:06 AM

I think that the "days of obligation" are a result of not so much legalism as minimalism. The Western ideal is salvific minimalism--what's the least I can do to squeak by as "saved"? Orthodox are salvific maximalists--pile it on--buckets, barrels, let's drink from the fire hose!

#9 John Konstantin

John Konstantin

    Frequent Poster

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 342 posts

Posted 30 March 2011 - 11:24 AM

I think the over arching problem is one of guilt. As some one who has been on both sides of the fence so to speak, I find no comparison whatsoever with my attendance at Liturgy ( which is a joy and a blessing and some thing I look forward to) with my attendances at Mass....where very often in order to meet the 'obligation' I often had to sit (yes sit!) through the most dire of masses. Now this was quite bearable at a beautiful Missa Cantata but more often than not it was at some of the most lack lustre, casual and perfunctory masses imaginable. Often the daily masses were rattled through. A 20 minute Low Mass was not unusual. But that didn't matter, mass was seen to be said, obligations fulfilled, mortal sin avoided. Finally the penny dropped when I realised mass was indeed an obligation. Such an obligation that I began to resent it.

I can honestly say despite the many miles racked up in order to participate in the Liturgy, have I never resented one, not been blessed by one or put off from attending again. God be praised!




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users