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A question about versions of the Synaxarion


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#21 Nathaniel Woon

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Posted 05 September 2009 - 05:12 AM

Thanks for the information Fr. Raphael. The foreword in the edition of the Prologue of Ohrid that I have mentioned that the prologue was a form of the synaxarion. I am not sure who wrote the foreword (i.e.whether it was by St. Nikolai or one of the translators). From what I remember, it seemed to say that prologues were a Slavic term for the synaxarion.

#22 Fr Raphael Vereshack

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Posted 05 September 2009 - 02:57 PM

From what I remember, it seemed to say that prologues were a Slavic term for the synaxarion.


I think that these are different forms of spiritual literature.

A synaxarion is only the lives of the saints. This would correspond to what in Slavonic/Russian is called zhitie svyatich, lives of the saints.

A prologue is a shortened life of the saints with added spiritual reading.

In Christ- Fr Raphael

#23 Nathaniel Woon

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Posted 18 January 2011 - 01:48 PM

Has anyone seen the latest two volumes in the Great Synaxaristes published by Holy Apostles' Convent? There is a volume for the Triodion and another for the Pentecostarion period. The first volume appears to be much thicker than the other volumes in the series.

http://www.holyapost...&products_id=37
http://www.holyapost...&products_id=38

#24 Fr Raphael Vereshack

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Posted 18 January 2011 - 02:06 PM

Has anyone seen the latest two volumes in the Great Synaxaristes published by Holy Apostles' Convent? There is a volume for the Triodion and another for the Pentecostarion period. The first volume appears to be much thicker than the other volumes in the series.

http://www.holyapost...&products_id=37
http://www.holyapost...&products_id=38


I also would greatly appreciate some comment on these. I have a number of their earlier 'lives of the saints' volumes (up to the one on the prophets) and they were very good. But I don't know about these later volumes.

In Christ- Fr Raphael

#25 Nathaniel Woon

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Posted 26 February 2011 - 03:14 AM

I just received the Triodion volume two days ago and I am very very pleased to have it with me - it is indeed a wonderful resource to have. I have no hesitation to recommend it to everyone.

#26 Sbdn. Peter Simko

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Posted 01 May 2017 - 09:05 PM

Christ is risen!

 

Does anyone happen to know of the current progress on the unpublished volumes of the Chrysostom Press edition of the Synaxarion?  I am looking at investing in a set soon, so I would like to wait on theirs if the timeline is within reason for my own schedule.  Thanks!



#27 Christophoros

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Posted 18 January 2018 - 03:55 PM

On the western influences of St Dmitri of Rostov, from "Ways of Russian Theology" by Protopresbyter Georges Florovsky:

 

The two most outstanding examples of Kievan learning in the late seventeeth century were Saint Dimitrii (Tuptalo, 1651-1709) and Stefan Iavorskii, though to be sure their religious importance is not confined to the history of Kievan theology. Each played a large part in the history of Great Russian theology. Nevertheless, both figures are quite representative of the later years of the Mogila epoch. Dimitrii, who became bishop of Rostov after his move to the north, is famous for his work in the field of hagiography. Here his main work was his book of saints' lives, The Reading Compendium (Chet i-Minei, 1689-1705). Based for the most part on western sources, the bulk of the work is taken from the renowned seven volume collection of Laurentius Surius, Vitae sanctorum Orientis et Occidentis, (1563-1586, itself actually a reworking into Latin of Symeon Metaphrastes' work on the lives of saints). Dimitrii also utilized various of the volumes of the Acta Sanctorum, which had by his time appeared in the Bollandists' edition, as well as Skarga's personal collection of hagiographies, Lives of the Saints (Zywoty swgtych, 1576) which, judging from the large number of translations that circulated in manuscript form, must have been popular among the Orthodox for a long time. Skarga's style and language, too, left a deep imprint on the work of St. Dimitrii. Greek and Old Church Slavonic materials, however, are hardly present at all, and there is scarcely a trace of the diction and idiom of the East. St. Dimitrii's sermons were also of a western character, especially those of the early years. The same is true of his morality plays, written in Rostov for school performances, and patterned as they were after the popular Jesuit dramas of the time. The catalogue of Dimitrii's private library which has been preserved tells a similar story: Aquinas, Cornelius a Lapide, Canisius, Martin Becan, the sermons of Mlodzianowski, numerous books on history, the Acta Sanctorum, a number of the Fathers in western editions, and publications from Kiev and others of the cities in the south. On the whole it was a library appropriate to an erudite Latin. True, in his spiritual life, St. Dimitrii was not confined to the narrow mold of a Latin world, but as a thinker and writer he was never able to free himself from the mental habits and forms of theological pseudo-Classicism acquired when at school in Kiev. Nor did he wish to do so, insisting with obstinacy on their sacred character. And in the north, in Russia, where he settled, he never came to understand its distinctive religious ethos and the circumstances that shaped it. To cite but one example: Dimitrii understood the Old Believer movement as no more than the blindness of an ignorant populace. 






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