Jump to content


Photo
* - - - - 1 votes

Greece under Nazi occupation, Mt. Athos?


  • Please log in to reply
9 replies to this topic

#1 Jake A.

Jake A.

    Regular Poster

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 156 posts
  • Orthodox Christian Member

Posted 12 October 2009 - 06:14 PM

...during the Second World War, the Epistassia, the four-member executive committee appointed annually by the Holy Community, asked Hitler to place Mount Athos under his personal protection, and he agreed.



http://www.macedonia...al/History.html

What is your personal opinion on Hitler placing the Holy Mountain under his personal protection, during WWII?

#2 Paul Cowan

Paul Cowan

    Very Frequent Poster

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,064 posts
  • Orthodox Christian Member

Posted 13 October 2009 - 03:04 AM

Personal opinion huh?

What's the best way to keep (or hope to keep ) from being beat up by the school bully? Give him your lunch money before he decides beating you up for it is more fun.

Paul

#3 Vasiliki D.

Vasiliki D.

    Very Frequent Poster

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 674 posts

Posted 13 October 2009 - 03:28 AM

Actually, it is a true fact that Hitler protected the Holy Mountain. It is also known to all Greeks that the Germans were not allowed to destroy Greece's archaeological and ecclesiastical monuments.

#4 Effie Ganatsios

Effie Ganatsios

    Very Frequent Poster

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,725 posts
  • Orthodox Christian Member

Posted 13 October 2009 - 08:25 AM

Some of the things I know about the Orthodox Church and the Nazis.

Firstly and most importantly, the Church in South Greece - including Athens, which was under the control of the German Nazis - was instrumental in saving a lot of Greeks who happened to be Jews. At this time, North Greece was under the control of the Italians, who were not very enthusiastic concerning Hitler's obsession with the Jews and were therefore lax in persecuting them and sending them to the concentration camps. Things later changed when the Germans took over North Greece as well.

In our area the Church was regarded by some as being "too friendly" with the German Nazis. As Paul said, perhaps it was just a matter of becoming friendly with a bully in order to protect yourself.

The one cleric who, in my opinion, is a hero because of his resistance to the Germans is Augoustinos of Florina. He preached and encouraged the people of my city to resist in any way they could, with the result that one Sunday many Greek families, children included, deliberately defied German orders and crossed a barrier of German soldiers who were supposed to prevent them from attending church. The German soldiers did not shoot, perhaps because of the large number of families who defied them.

Augoustinos was hounded by the Germans and hid in the cellars of various houses until he could escape. One of the houses he hid in was my husband's auntie's house.

He is still alive today and is over 100 years old. At least the last I heard.... The above events are recorded in two of his books.

Effie

#5 Alice

Alice

    Very Frequent Poster

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 673 posts
  • Orthodox Christian Member

Posted 13 October 2009 - 09:28 AM

Fascinating, dear Effie! Thanks for sharing all that-and all the more fascinating as it is from first hand knowledge.

#6 Nina

Nina

    Very Frequent Poster

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,149 posts

Posted 13 October 2009 - 05:08 PM

I know from my grandmother who lived to be a centennial, that when part of the German army came and collected all the male children to execute them if the inhabitants did not tell who did some damage to their camp (I think it was the partisans who were communists but people did not tell on them). So they had all the kids against a wall and were getting ready to execute and since my oldest uncle was there also my grandmother run to the German general (who was giving orders) and kissed him (lol) and begged him to not kill the children and spare them. Suddenly from all the authority and toughness he had shown, he became like a lamb and took his soldiers and left. These people were not some monsters. These people were like us who had the bad "luck" to be born where and when they had and leave their families and wives and children and go to other places, not because they chose to but because they were mobilized. Of course there are people who have an innate tendency to do monstrous things but in general they are people like you and I: with their sins and virtues, with their families, dreams, joys, or misfortunes. If we learn to recognize/see the good even in the most bestial person we can not go wrong. It is after all imitating our Christ, Who forgives us every second for our sins grave or little; and Who, when on earth, was so merciful and compassionate to all, and especially to those who were considered the black sheep of society.

#7 Nina

Nina

    Very Frequent Poster

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,149 posts

Posted 13 October 2009 - 05:14 PM

P.S It is interesting the bully idea ha ha ha Paul. But it will not work with the antiChrist I think because they say a prophecy about Athos that before the end of the world, Athos will be submerged in the sea as for the holies and sacred objects there not to be defiled. So it is interesting to read the first post of this thread and juxtapose it to what antiChrist will do. Not that it will help with our salvation, but nevertheless interesting.

#8 Alice

Alice

    Very Frequent Poster

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 673 posts
  • Orthodox Christian Member

Posted 13 October 2009 - 06:29 PM

Suddenly from all the authority and toughness he had shown, he became like a lamb and took his soldiers and left. These people were not some monsters. These people were like us who had the bad "luck" to be born where and when they had and leave their families and wives and children and go to other places, not because they chose to but because they were mobilized.


This reminds me of the movie and book 'Corelli's Mandolin', and the young and nice German soldier who became friends with Captain Corelli on the island of Cephalonia... and how in the end, he got so upset because when the Germans were losing the war, he was given orders to shoot his Italian friend and his regiment/men....

#9 Vasiliki D.

Vasiliki D.

    Very Frequent Poster

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 674 posts

Posted 13 October 2009 - 11:26 PM

This thread reminded me of two miracles that our fellowship group has discussed in times past. Note, Greece, of all countries, suffered the least under the Germans and this we attribute to the fact that all of Mount Athos was praying for Greece and the holy relics protected us! Yes, it was terrible times but in the greater context of the war we had it much better than other countries … and the war ended shortly after the Germans entered Greece. Coincidence? ... if we consider the approach of the saints, such as St Dionysios, and others towards their enemies then we can see the monks of Mount Athos without suspicion and with the eyes of loving orthodox.

Miracle One: Saint Markella of Chios

During March of 1942, when Greece was under German occupation, thirty-nine Greek officers secretly sailed from Lavrion to Asia Minor. When the launch was between Chios and Mytilene, they encountered a fierce storm. The boat was severely damaged and became totally uncontrollable. About 1:00 A.M., one of the officers fell overboard and was drowned. During this desperate situation, the other officers fearfully prayed to the Almighty. One of them, Kreon Talios, says that he saw a dark mysterious cloud from which emanated a bright light. From within this light there developed a beautiful building which was a church. Emerging from the church was a beautiful girl who beckoned to the officers with her right hand to be calm. Miraculously the storm subsided. By day-break, the boat had drifted near the "Tomb of Saint Marcella." At this time, a patrol of Volissians, headed by Alexander Zorbas, were in the area. Among these men were two brothers, named Karagiosis, who strangely enough had served under Kreon Talios on the Albanian front. These men helped the officers bring the boat to the cove of Saint Marcella. The monk Arsenias, the church’s caretaker, hid the officers, since the Germans had a garrison in Volissos. In three days the boat was repaired and the officers again set sail for Asia Minor where there were ruins of a church next to a wild olive tree. The church was named Saint Marcella, the same as the church in Volissos which is next to a huge tree.


Miracle Two: Saint Charalambos saves the town of Filiatra in Greece:

The miracle took place in the small Peloponnesian town of Filiatra in 1943, during the dark days of the occupation of Greece by the Germans. This miracle has moved and continues to move, to this today, not only the people of Filiatra but also the people of all Greece.
----
From the German Headquarters in Tripoli, orders were issued to Officer Kondau, in charge in Filiatra, to burn the town, because of a sabotage that the rebels had instigated. The Commandant was ordered to kill a certain number of notable Filiatrians, to take as prisoners the 1,500 other citizens, and to send them to Germany, after which it is was obvious they would never return.

Officer Kondau, feeling no pity, in turn, gave the orders to his soldiers to follow through with implementing the destruction, on the following day at 6:00AM in the morning.

In Tripol, the Priest, Archimandrite Theodore Kotsakis, who was originally from Filiatra, learned of this plan. Grief and worry overcame everyone; no one knew what to do to save Filiatra and its people. So, the priest Theodore found someone who knew German, and together they went to the house of the German Officer in Tripoli. But while they waited outside his office, loud voices, cursing and a great upheaval were heard. A Greek woman pulled on the priest's cassock, urging him to leave, so that they might not be killed there, right on the spot!

Thereby, upon leaving, the Priest notified all the people from Filiatra who were living in Tripoli, to pray that night to Saint Charalambos, who was Patron Saint of Filiatra, asking him to intercede for the town and its people. Then the Priest Theodore closed himself in his room and prayed with much pain and sorrow. And the citizens of Filiatra did the same, as they had caught wind of something going on, themselves.

Saint Charalambos heard their prayers and performed the miracle! The Saint then appeared that night to Officer Kondau while he was sleeping. He appeared to him as a serious, old and dignified man of holy countenance, dressed in priestly robes and having a long white beard. This German conqueror, who was a protestant, had never seen such a face or such an appearance ever before in his life. The solemn Elder then said to him with such sweetness: "Listen, my son, do not carry out the orders you were given."

The dream was so real that it created a great impression on him. He awakened suddenly and then went back to sleep, but, with determination, however, to carry out the order he was given. Then once again the Saint appeared to him in his sleep and said: "That which I have told you to do, do it. Do not execute the order. Do not be afraid. I will make sure that you are not punished." Again, he awakened, and the words spoken to him were whirling around in his mind. But it was impossible for him not to carry out the order, after all the Germans would execute him if he didn't. Once again he fell asleep. And once again the solemn Elder appeared to him for a third time, saying: "I told you not to be afraid. I will see to it that you are not punished. I will protect you and all your men. You will all return to your homes and nothing will happen to you."

At first, the Commandant wanted to ignore the order of Saint Charalambos, in order to appear the giant. But despite all his intransigence, he yielded, because afterwards, as this German Officer himself related, he heard in his sleep shouts and cries, as if coming from people being tortured right in his own courtyard. Then, real life figures appeared like women, many women, who were beating themselves on the heads and chests out of unbearable misfortune and pain

They were mourning, showing desperation, and cursing, out of agony in anticipation of the slaughter of their children and grandchildren that was to take place. All of these voices then became like a big cloud that ascended on high, into the heavens, without anything falling to the earth.

And furthermore, as he slept, the German Officer saw long black clouds that were coming out of his room, ascending, and casting a shadow upon the sun, with the sun trying to hide from the clouds as if it were a person who in turn was casting shadows on the faces of his soldiers. Some of soldiers were afraid, while others were asking for help as they made the sign of the cross. And still others were running and hiding behind the olive groves.

From his fright he woke up. He tried to speak but couldn't, rather his mouth was agape as he looked at the image in his dream, the old man that he saw three times in his dream who had the appearance of a Saint of the Orthodox church. When he came to his senses, he began thinking of the evil that was about to happen: the slaughter of human beings, like dogs to remain on the streets without burial and of houses burning in seconds which had taken centuries to be built!

These reflections stirred him. But still he said to himself: "I said I was going to burn this town and burn it I will!"

Then he closed his eyes. And the old man, Saint Charalambos, appeared once again before him, in a threatening and persistent manner. In a loud and emphatic voice, the Saint said to him: "Be careful! This town is not going to burn and its people are not going to be captured. They are innocent. Do you hear me?"

The German Officer stood up, steadied himself, as his knees were shaking from fright and he picked up the telephone. With a trembling voice, he called Tripoli to speak to the German Commandant of all Peloponesos. And when this commandant tried to respond to give orders, he faltered. He tried to get fierce so that his orders would be carried out, but he wasn't able to! So what was going on? That same night he also had also seen Saint Charalambos in his sleep, just as the Officer Kondau from Filiatra had described him on the telephone. And finally, the Commandant resolutely told the Officer in Filiatra: "Write this down. I am suspending the destruction of the town. Come immediately to see me tomorrow at noon!"

At daybreak, the decision by the Germans to revoke the order was announced. Everywhere there were shouts of joy to be heard by the townspeople, in the cafes, in the square, in the streets...

One battalion, then, of German soldiers with Officer Kondau and two Orthodox priests in the middle, walked down the street going from Church to Church. They started at Saint John's, then Saint Nicholas', then Saint Athanasios' and finally headed for the Church of the Panagia (The All holy one).

Officer Kondau was searching for the icon of the Saint that he saw in his dream. When they opened for him he door of the Temple of the Panagia, he recognized among the icons, Saint Charalambos, whom he had seen in his dream, who had commanded him. His voice broke. He became ashamed of his pride. He hid his face with his hands. Shortly, he lowered them. And this Protestant, on bended knee, made the sign of the cross. He uttered a few prayers in his own language, of which the priests present were unable to interpret.

Afterwards, he asked the priests to tell him who this geronda (elder) depicted in the icon was. They related to him that it was Saint Charalambos who bore many torments for Christ. Then they told him of the many miracles that the Saint had performed, and still does to this day.

There are no words to describe the joy felt by the people of Filiatra and their gratitude toward the Saint. They glorified God and they thanked Saint Charalambos for the miracle. And just as the Saint had told Officer Kondau, the leader of the garrison, and all his men, after the war was over, they returned safely to Germany and to their homes, without anyone being harmed. The German Officer, thus, preserved vividly the memory of this miracle and showed gratitude to the Saint. He hoped to return from Germany to venerate him. And in fact, after two years, he came with his wife to the town of Filiatra. But, on his first pilgrimage, he didn't quite make it for the Feast Day of the Saint. He came one day later, on February 11th.

When, however, the people of Filiatra saw him, they were so overjoyed that they celebrated the Feast Day all over again. They chanted the doxology; they held receptions and dinners and other festivities. And up until recent times this German Officer with wife and family and other countrymen have come on the 10th of February to the town of Filiatra to venerate and pay homage with faith to this Saint. In their hearts Orthodoxy had blossomed.

Apolytikion of St. Haralambos the Martyr, Fourth Tone

Saint Haralambos the Martyr and Miracle-Worker "O wise Haralambos, you were proven an unshakable pillar of the Church of Christ; an evershining lamp of the universe. You shone in the world by your martyrdom. You delivered us from the moonless night of idolatry O blessed One. Wherefore, boldly intercede to Christ that we may be saved.

Holy Saint Charalambos Pray to God for Us!

~ Translation by Narthex Press.

#10 Effie Ganatsios

Effie Ganatsios

    Very Frequent Poster

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,725 posts
  • Orthodox Christian Member

Posted 14 October 2009 - 08:09 AM

This thread reminded me of two miracles that our fellowship group has discussed in times past. Note, Greece, of all countries, suffered the least under the Germans and this we attribute to the fact that all of Mount Athos was praying for Greece and the holy relics protected us! Yes, it was terrible times but in the greater context of the war we had it much better than other countriesand the war ended shortly after the Germans entered Greece.



Vasiliki, the Germans entered Greece in April, 1941. The war certainly did not end shortly after this.

Germany was forced to invade Greece because of the fiasco of the attempted Italian invasion through Albania, of Greece. The British insisted that we pull all our troops from the Albanian front and deploy them on our northern borders. We thus lost North Iperos and all our young men who fought so bravely against a much stronger and well equipped enemy seem to have died in vain. They were valiant because they fought hard to protect their country against an enemy attempting to conquer it.

Brave Australian and New Zealand men also died in Greece whilst helping her.
Even today we remember them in yearly ceremonies. Something that will probably also be discarded along with so much more. It's sad that "world globilization" also includes a refusal to remember the dead in an attempt to regard all nations as "friends". Sad for those who died but useful for the parasites who built fortunes on their bones. And useful for those "historians" who are busy rewriting history as we speak.

Prayer is a powerful "weapon" against evil. But surely other nations were also praying. Is Greece special? I don't think so.

War, to me, is a disgusting waste of youth. A foul method employed by men who know that they will not be called upon to go into battle, and so feel free to rouse the wrath of those they govern and send others to be slaughtered.

The words of the Australian song about Gallipoli are so true :

"we were butchered like lambs at the slaughter" .

Sorry to be so outspoken.

Effie

Sorry about the large size of the sentence I was replying to. I tried to change the size but wasn't able to. [I](Fixed. Mod.)

Edited by Herman Blaydoe, 14 October 2009 - 11:50 AM.
formatting





0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users