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Which version of the bible to use?


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#21 Mary M.

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Posted 10 January 2010 - 10:21 PM

Christ is Baptized! In the Jordan!

Hi All,
I was brought up with the KJV and love the language. I agree with the modern day Athonite saint (whose name I don't recall right now) who believed that liturgical language should differ from regular speech, but I believe that some portions were translated incorrectly or ambiguously, so it may not be the most accurate bible to use.

The Orthodox Study Bible does have it's quirks; I tried to follow the psalm readings for Lent and found that several psalms were missing passages and even accounting for the difference in numbering between bibles, some of the OSB psalm and proverbs passages were inaccurately numbered. But, it would seem that the OSB or some other modern language translation would be easier for a non-native English speaker to follow than the KJV.
I always have a selection of bibles including the Oxford University Press' The New English Bible with the Apocrypha.

There's a bible edition that was released around 2003 that consists of volumes of the New and Old Testaments with commentary from the Church Fathers. INformation can be found here:http://www.ivpress.c...gi-ivpress/book.

#22 Ben Johnson

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Posted 11 January 2010 - 12:27 AM

Nuts. I tried to edit a post and it disappeard and then reappeared after I rewrote it. Sorry about that.

#23 Ben Johnson

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Posted 11 January 2010 - 12:29 AM

I once read an Orthodox site (I can't remember which one) which gave the ins and outs of various translations. It's last words of wisdom are, "Which ever version you have, use it."

#24 Andrew G.

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Posted 11 January 2010 - 04:16 AM

I personally like the KJV of the Bible, although I use the Orthodox Study Bible whenever I have problems understanding the Old English. From what I hear, the KJV also matches the Greek Orthodox Lectionary the closest.
Liturgically, my Church (I believe) uses the New King James verision of the Gospel (Though, both our Deacon and Priest want to switch to the origional KJV), and the St. Tikhon version for the Epistle.

#25 Richard A. Downing

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Posted 11 January 2010 - 05:46 PM

I find that there are two or three reasons for reading the Books. If I want to just read it as a book, say for the story of Tobit, then a modern translation such as NKJV is needed - I want my mind on the story, not the translation. If I am studying a passage to write about it, then I want something else, something that helps me understand the historical context, the authors intent, and I will also be looking for a commentary or two from the Fathers - usually that means several translations. And despite it's protestant leanings, I find http://www.biblegateway.com excellent - it even has some Koine Greek. Sometimes it's good to have the book read to you (especially the Hebrew books - for the names etc.) and then the same site has some versions read. On my desk I see KJV, NIV, NRSV, The Message (a modern protestant paraphrase), NETS, and OSB. Often, I sing the psalms from "The Psalter According to the Seventy." from the website http://orthodox.seasidehosting.st.

Love to you all, Richard.

(My first serious posting on Monachos.net)

#26 Michael Stickles

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Posted 11 January 2010 - 06:13 PM

If I want to just read it as a book, say for the story of Tobit, then a modern translation such as NKJV is needed - I want my mind on the story, not the translation. If I am studying a passage to write about it, then I want something else, something that helps me understand the historical context, the authors intent, and I will also be looking for a commentary or two from the Fathers - usually that means several translations. And despite it's protestant leanings, I find http://www.biblegateway.com excellent - it even has some Koine Greek.


That pretty much matches my own approach. I tend to do my personal reading from the RSV (I have a version with the deuterocanonicals included in their proper places). For study, I might add in the NASB, OSB, and/or Green's Literal Translation (from my Greek interlinear NT). Occasionally I'll also make use of the KJV and NIV (the latter usually when I'm discussing a verse with someone online). If I'm doing serious study I add in my Greek texts (a Septuagint and two Greek NT versions).

In Christ,
Michael




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