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The Gospel message in Genesis


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#1 Antonios

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Posted 24 June 2010 - 05:19 AM

I found something yesterday which I found very edifying and would like to share with all of you.

If you take all the descendants of Adam until Noah as listed in Genesis 5 and translate their names from their Hebrew meaning, you get an astonishing message!

Hebrew = English
Adam = Man
Seth = Appointed
Enosh = Mortal
Kenan = Sorrow
Mahalalel = The Blessed God
Jared = Shall come down
Enoch = Teaching
Methuselah = His death shall bring
Lamech = The Despairing
Noah = Comfort (or Rest)

This can be put together to read:

Man (has) appointed mortal sorrow; (but) the Blessed God shall come down teaching (that) His death shall bring (the) despairing rest.



#2 Kusanagi

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Posted 24 June 2010 - 10:20 AM

Excellent, never occured to see things that way. Was it done by research or how did you come about translating the names?

#3 Antonios

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Posted 24 June 2010 - 12:33 PM

Actually, I found it on this website while researching what the name Lamech meant in Hebrew and thought others here would find it interesting.

#4 Paul Cowan

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Posted 25 June 2010 - 02:59 AM

Who said that Bible Code stuff was phoney baloney? I knew there had to be a hidden message in there somewhere. We just needed "the keymaster" to help us unlock the mystery.

#5 Antonios

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Posted 25 June 2010 - 07:16 AM

Who said that Bible Code stuff was phoney baloney? I knew there had to be a hidden message in there somewhere. We just needed "the keymaster" to help us unlock the mystery.


Upon clicking on your links, I'm confused as to what you mean. While I know we should be wary of possible 'hidden meanings' and not look for things that are merely constructs of my our fallen mind which often involves more fantasy than anything else (something I regrettably confess to being guilty of most of the time), should we ignore such an observation as in the OP as simply coincidental? I am not talking about the 'Bible Code' (whose author believes that extraterrestial beings created the Bible), but for the OP specifically, that the names mentioned by Moses of the male descendants that lead from Adam to Noah gives an obvious (to me at least) message of the gospel.

#6 Paul Cowan

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Posted 25 June 2010 - 01:05 PM

Forgive my tongue in cheek comedy Antonios. As I read the webpage we were directed to I felt as if I was reading some "new" found revelation. I had the feeling of reading the text of someone who was stretching to say the least to make his point anyway he could by pulling in words and thoughts that if pulled in a certain would make his point.

(A caveat: many study aids can prove rather superficial, however; and any inferences are certainly not free of controversy.)


Methuselah's father was given a prophecy of the coming Great Flood, and was apparently told that as long as his son was alive, the judgement of the flood would be withheld. (Can you imagine raising a kid like that? Every time the boy caught a cold, they must have panicked!) The year that Methuselah died, the flood came. It is interesting that Methuselah's life, in effect, was a symbol of God's grace in forestalling the coming judgement of the flood. It is, therefore, fitting that his lifetime is the oldest in the Bible, speaking of the extensiveness of God's grace.


Really? Where is this prophesy written or even accepted by the church?

Enosh's son was named Kenan, which can mean "sorrow," or "wandering nomad." (The precise denotation is somewhat elusive; some study aids even assume that Kenan is synonymous with "Cainan."


This next statement worries me. And is why I wrote what I did.

The Bible is an integrated message system, the product of supernatural engineering. Every number, every place name, every detail every jot and tittle is there for our learning, our discovery, and our amazement. Truly, our God is an awesome God.

Look behind every detail; there's a discovery to be made! God always rewards the diligent student. What other "messages" lay hidden behind the names in the Bible? The names of each of the sons of Jacob have meanings. The resulting Twelve Tribes are listed in different orders throughout the Bible. Do they spell out messages, too? Check it out.


I have learned to be very skeptical with anythign I read on the WWW.

Paul

#7 Antonios

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Posted 25 June 2010 - 02:40 PM

I agree with you that the particular paragraph you mentioned worries me too which relates to looking for hidden codes or messages in places where they may not be. Especially if one fixates themselves on some 'codes or hidden meanings' while neglecting the obvious teachings and commandments. This can easily be a symptom of pride.

The author of this article whom I assume is Protestant has taken a couple of teachings (for example, of the prophecy of Methuselah's father which you referred to) from Jewish sources.

This prophecy is found in the Book of Enoch which I understand is not listed as canonical in the Orthodox Church, however is considered so in the Ethiopian Orthodox Church.

That being said, many of the earliest Christian did consider this book authoritative (notably St. Athenagoras, St. Clement, Irenaeus, and Tertullian). In fact, this particular prophecy regarding Methuselah's father (Enoch) is explicitly referred to in the Epistle of St. Jude:

Now Enoch, the seventh from Adam, prophesied about these men also, saying, “Behold, the Lord comes with ten thousands of His saints, to execute judgment on all, to convict all who are ungodly among them of all their ungodly deeds which they have committed in an ungodly way, and of all the harsh things which ungodly sinners have spoken against Him.” (Jude 1:14,15)

This very fact caused much discussion in the past as to whether the Epistle of Jude should be regarded as canonical.

Some other interesting things I have read regarding the Book of Enoch is that it refers to the origin of evil stemming from the falling of angels which was a reason why the Jews rejected the Book of Enoch. Also, it's prophesy of the coming Messiah called "Son of Man", with divine attributes, generated before the creation, Who will act directly in the final judgment and sit on a throne of glory.

Either way, even if one removes these controversial topics out of the article I listed above, it does not in any way affect the point the author originally tried to make, that the names listed express an interesting message consistent with the gospel when translated. While we should always reject those things the Church has explicitly countered and rejected and should always be skeptical of things that seem foreign to us, especially things not explicitly referred to in the writings of the saints or addressed by the Church, we should also heed the final words of the Gospel according to St. John: "And there are also many other things that Jesus did, which if they were written one by one, I suppose that even the world itself could not contain the books that would be written. Amen."

#8 Herman Blaydoe

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Posted 25 June 2010 - 02:54 PM

I believe Paul's post was meant in a humorous, not a serious, manner. Ah the foibles of cross-cultural humor in an ascii world. It's hard to be funny to the lowest common denominator, especially since you can't render slapstick in ascii.

Herman the slapstick Pooh C|:= (an attempt at an ascii rendition of Charlie Chaplin)

#9 Archimandrite Irenei

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Posted 01 July 2010 - 04:31 PM

.... except, in point of fact, Adam means 'Dust creature'. ;-)

#10 Dcn Alexander Haig

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Posted 03 July 2010 - 10:05 PM

While these "messages" may be interesting ideas to meditate upon, please do not treat them as theology: people get caught up with finding hidden messages so miss the Gospel altogether.

With love in Xp
Alex

#11 Darren

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Posted 10 July 2010 - 04:44 PM

.... except, in point of fact, Adam means 'Dust creature'. ;-)


In Hebrew Adam means dust or creature?

From the NAS exhaustive concordance and from Strong's concordance, the meaning of Adam is;

any man (2), anyone (4), anyone's (1), being* (1), common sort* (1), human (19), infantry (1), low degree* (1), low* (1), man (363), man's (20), man* (1), mankind (9), men (104), men of low degree* (1), men's (3), men* (4), mortal (1), one (3), people (1), person (5), person* (1), persons (3), population (1), someone (1).

Source: http://strongsnumber.../hebrew/120.htm

#12 Darren

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Posted 10 July 2010 - 05:05 PM

Here is another strange coincidence I noticed, in Revelation13:18 John gives the beast(antichrist) the number 666 and calls it the number of a person or man depending on your translation. The typical interpretation of this is that it was a numerical code for Caesar Nero(a type of antichrist). In John's gospel in chapter and verse 6:66 it describes those disciples who left Christ, in 1John18-19 he describes those that left them as antichrists. This could be merely accidental or deliberate, what confounds the coincidence is that the sixth chapter of John's Gospel is the only chapter to go as high as verse 66.

#13 Archimandrite Irenei

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Posted 10 July 2010 - 05:52 PM

In Hebrew Adam means dust or creature?


No, it means 'dust creature'. Keep looking!

#14 Darren

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Posted 10 July 2010 - 09:02 PM

I just noticed the smiley, I assume you're being sarcastic?

#15 Paul Cowan

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Posted 10 July 2010 - 09:25 PM

Why could it not mean dust creature? We were "created" from "dust".

#16 Archimandrite Irenei

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Posted 10 July 2010 - 09:35 PM

No, not at all!

#17 Antonios

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Posted 11 July 2010 - 04:20 AM

As Father Irenaeus has pointed out, Adam comes from the word adamah which means ground or earth.

Gen. 2.7 explains that the man was called Adam because he was formed from the ground (adamah).

#18 Darren

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Posted 11 July 2010 - 09:45 AM

There is some debate whether the word Adam comes from the word adamah, and the two words are translated separately(Genesis2:7).

Man= Adam

Ground= Adamah

Can you show me any translation that translates the word Adam as, 'dust creature'?

#19 Ben Johnson

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Posted 12 July 2010 - 04:17 AM

It is very difficult to determine if Adam comes from Adamah or the reverse. We simply do not know. Edom (red) is related to both words. Just pure speculation on my part: The Hebrew word for blood is dam (the a is pronounced like the a in father). I can't help but wonder if the other words are derived from it.


--Ben

#20 Paul Cowan

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Posted 12 July 2010 - 04:55 AM

I heard in a TV movie once (solid Hollywood factoid) that only humans can blush. Perhaps where the dam in Adam came from? Maybe not.




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