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'Hail holy Queen' prayer in Orthodoxy?


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#1 Caleb Shoemaker

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Posted 15 August 2010 - 07:10 PM

I am curious how prevalent, if at all, this prayer is in Orthodox private devotion? I have never heard it said during liturgy or other services. I also know that it's specific to the Western Marian Rosary. Being a new catechumen, I wonder if there's anything about the prayer specifically that would prevent it being prayed by an Orthodox? The text is below:

Hail, Holy Queen, Mother of Mercy,
our Life, our Sweetness, and our Hope.
To Thee do we cry, poor banished children of Eve.
To Thee do we send up our sighs mourning
and weeping in this valley of tears.
Turn then, most gracious Advocate,
Thine Eyes of Mercy toward us,
and after this our exile show us the
Blessed Fruit of thy Womb, Jesus.
O clement, O loving, O sweet Virgin Mary.
Pray for us O Holy Mother of God
That we may be made worthy of the promises of Christ.

#2 Antonios

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Posted 15 August 2010 - 07:14 PM

A beautiful prayer!

#3 Jason H.

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Posted 15 August 2010 - 07:33 PM

I have never heard of it's use in the Orthodox Church nor come across it any one the prayer books or Akathists. As you stated the Salve Regina, it's Latin name, is primarily used in the devotion of the rosary. It is thought to be composed sometime in the 11th century; although it has been attributed to different authors. It is a Roman prayer.

#4 Benjamin Amis

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Posted 15 August 2010 - 09:28 PM

11th century, and absolutely beautiful! Of course, I've never heard this prayer before (perhaps I should more familiarize myself with the prayers of the rosary?), but from all I can see, there is nothing that contradicts Orthodox doctrine in the prayer (no reference to Immaculate Conception or Assumption without Dormition, etc. Of course, these were doctrines from much later in history).

The old rites of Latin Orthodoxy are truly beautiful. In spite of theological differences, even the Counter-Reformation Tridentine Mass is quite magnificent. The modernization of the Roman liturgy is truly a shame, and I hope we see a Western liturgical revival from them soon. And of course, let us remember our Western-Rite Orthodox, who are being faithful to revive the beautiful Latin tradition of the Church!

#5 Matthew M.

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Posted 15 August 2010 - 11:53 PM

I'm sure this has been brought up, but is it acceptable to say the Hail Mary?

"Hail Mary, full of grace, the Lord is with thee; blessed art thou amongst women, and blessed is the fruit of thy womb, Jesus.
Holy Mary, Mother of God, pray for us sinners, now and at the hour of our death. Amen."

#6 Ruth Sammons

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Posted 16 August 2010 - 01:03 AM

Western Rite Orthodox pray the Hail Mary. So it must be acceptable.

#7 Olga

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Posted 16 August 2010 - 01:22 AM

We have our very own Orthodox version of the Hail Mary, and it is one of the standard, and best-known Theotokia:

Virgin Mother of God, hail, Mary full of grace, the Lord is with you. Blessed are you among women, and blessed is the fruit of your womb, for you have given birth to the Saviour of our souls.

#8 Matthew M.

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Posted 16 August 2010 - 01:25 AM

We have our very own Orthodox version of the Hail Mary, and it is one of the standard, and best-known Theotokia:

Virgin Mother of God, hail, Mary full of grace, the Lord is with you. Blessed are you among women, and blessed is the fruit of your womb, for you have given birth to the Saviour of our souls.


I thought there must be one. Thank you very much Olga!

#9 Olga

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Posted 16 August 2010 - 02:03 AM

Here is the same Theotokion, in Slavonic and Greek:

Богородице Дево, радуйся, Благодатная Марие, Господь с тобою: благословена ты в женах и благословен Плод чрева твоего, яко Спаса родила еси душ наших.

Θεοτόκε Παρθένε, Χαῖρε κεχαριτωμένη Μαρία, ὁ Κύριος μετὰ σοῦ, εὐλογημένη, σὺ ἐν γυναιξί, καὶ εὐλογημένος ὁ καρπὸς τῆς κοιλίας σου, ὅτι Σωτῆρα ἔτεκες τῶν ψυχῶν ἡμῶν.

#10 Benjamin Amis

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Posted 16 August 2010 - 04:20 AM

Western Rite Orthodox pray the Hail Mary. So it must be acceptable.


I did not know that. Cool.

I apologize in advance for distracting from the OP, but can anyone speak as to if Western Rite Orthodox use the rosary? If so, how is it modified (I believe that some of the prayers make mention to the Immaculate Conception)?

#11 Marie+Duquette

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Posted 16 August 2010 - 12:08 PM

The Rosary, in my experience is composed of the Creed, the Our Father, the Hail Mary or Rejoice Mary full of grace, the Glory be, and followed by the Hail Holy Queen, as mentioned above. Usually the prayers of the Rosary, which are immersed in the words of Scripture are prayed with reflection and meditation/contemplation upon the 15 Mysteries of Christ and Mary. These being the Joyful, the Sorrowful and the Glorious, plus the 5 Mysteries of Light . All of these "Mysteries" are Biblical and Liturgical in Character, covering the Life of Christ from the Annunciation of the Angel Gabriel to Mary, up to the Assumption/Dormition of Mary.

#12 Michael Astley

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Posted 26 August 2010 - 11:26 AM

I am curious how prevalent, if at all, this prayer is in Orthodox private devotion? I have never heard it said during liturgy or other services. I also know that it's specific to the Western Marian Rosary. Being a new catechumen, I wonder if there's anything about the prayer specifically that would prevent it being prayed by an Orthodox?


Dear Caleb,

That antiphon is known by its Latin incipit Salve, Regina, (and it is a paraphrased translation of this antiphon that was made famous outside of church circles by the film Sister Act). It is not specific to the western rosary at all. It was borrowed and inserted into the rosary devotion but properly it is one of four traditional antiphons sung at the end of the Divine Office in the Roman Rite and, by custom (though not necessarily rubric), often sung as a public devotion at the end of the Mass. These are known as the "final antiphons" and they vary with the season. Some uses appoint them only to be sung after Compline but others (I think in Benedictine usage) also appoint them to be sung after Vespers and Lauds. Each one is followed by a versicle and response, and then a collect.

While the translation of the Salve, Regina that you have posted is the best known one and is commonly recited today in many Catholic parishes, (where they often tend not to bother chanting these things anymore, and where the Divine Office is seldom prayed publicly in the parishes), unfortunately it doesn't actually fit the tune. If you look in the St Dunstan's Plainsong Psalter or the Monastic Diurnal Noted, both published by the Lancelot Andrewes Press and used in the Orthodox Western Rite, you will find an English translation of the Salve, Regina along with the three other antiphons that fit the traditional plainsong melodies. You can hear a harmonised version of the most common melody here.

As somebody who loves this antiphon and who is a catechumen presumably from a western liturgical background, you may find my blog series of east/west overlap interesting, especially the first instalment.

Here are the others:

Alma Redemptoris Mater - sung from Vespers of the first Sunday of Advent until first Vespers of Candlemass (the Presentation of the Lord in the Temple)

Gracious Mother of our Redeemer, for ever abiding,
Gate of Heaven, and Star of the Sea,
O succour the people who, though falling, strive to rise again.
Thou Maiden who barest thy holy Creator
to the wonder of all nature,
Ever-Virgin, after as before thou receivedst that "Ave"
from the mouth of Gabriel,
have compassion on us sinners.

Up until Christmas
V/ The angel of the Lord announced unto Mary.
R/ And she conceived by the Holy Spirit.

Then the collect.

From Christmas until Candlemass
V/ After childbearing thou didst remain inviolate.
R/ Intercede for us, O Mother of God.

Then the collect.

Ave, Regina Caelorum - sung from second Vespers of Candlemass until Vespers of Wednesday in Holy Week

Queen of the heavens, we hail thee,
hail thee, Lady of all the angels;
thou the dawn, the door of morning,
whence the world's True Light is risen:
joy to thee, O Virgin glorious,
beautiful beyond all other;
hail, and fare well, O most gracious,
intercede for us alway to Jesus.

V/ Vouchsafe that I may praise thee, O holy Virgin.
R/ Give me strength against mine enemies.

Then the collect.

Regina Caeli - Sung from Compline of Holy Saturday (only by those who have not attended the Paschal Vigil, otherwise it is sung from Pascha itself) until the Saturday of the Octave of Pentecost

O Queen of heaven, be joyful: alleluia!
the Son it was thy privilege to bear, alleluia!
hath arisen as He promised. alleluia!
Pray for us to the Father, alleluia!

V/ Rejoice and be glad, O Virgin Mary. Alleluia!
R/ For the Lord is risen indeed. Alleluia!

Then the collect.

Edited by Michael Astley, 26 August 2010 - 11:34 AM.
ineptitude


#13 Fr Raphael Vereshack

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Posted 26 August 2010 - 01:30 PM

Salve, Regina helped me convert towards Orthodoxy while I was at Madonna House in the 1970s.

Such a beautiful hymn.

In Christ- Fr Raphael

#14 Andrew McQuillen

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Posted 07 December 2010 - 05:37 AM

The monks at the Hermitage of the Holy Cross in WV often sing this prayer at the end of Vespers and Matins in the evening.

Andrew

#15 Donna Rail

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Posted 07 December 2010 - 11:42 AM

Thank you, this is very helpful. I had been wondering things like that as well. :)

#16 Andrew Salvia

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Posted 09 January 2011 - 11:10 PM

The monks at the Hermitage of the Holy Cross in WV often sing this prayer at the end of Vespers and Matins in the evening.

Andrew


Yes, this is true. Hierodeacon Sergius told me that it is actually a prayer from St. Isaac of Syria, whom the brotherhood there is rather fond of.

In Christ,
Andrew




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