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Genesis 1-2: Man created on sixth day, enters paradise on seventh?


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#1 Guest_dimitri marinis

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Posted 17 September 2005 - 07:13 PM

Please enlighten me I can not quite understand the period between the 6th day creation of man and the Adam and Eve entrance in to paradise, reading the Genesis it seems as if man was created on the 6th day and Adam and Eve entered the paradise the 7th day?? It seems to be a gap between the two events, if that is so than is there a possibility that there were “pre-Adamic” men?

May God be with us all at all times
dimitri

#2 Guest_natasa

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Posted 18 September 2005 - 12:04 PM

Dear Dimitri,

It seems to me that when one reads the first and second chapter of the genesis book as there are two independant records. The second starting from Gen 2,4. Therfore man would be created in paradise.

Do you think that this possiblility of "pre-Adamic" men would be some teological hint to natural evolution of man?

natasa

#3 Patrick Walsh

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Posted 18 September 2005 - 12:29 PM

I refer you to "On the Mystical Life.' by St. Symeon the New Theologian.

He comments extensively on the creation passage in the book of Genesis. He points out the following:

1. Man was created on the sixth day. Not Adam, but Man in general. So no pre-Adamic men.
2. All that God had created from days 1-6 was handed over to Man, as his dominion.
3. Paradise was created on the eighth day, after man had been given his dominion. So Paradise was not included under Man's rule.

This all forshadows the Holy Week as follows:

1. Christ (Man) was crucified on the sixth day.
2. Christ reposed (rested) on the seventh day.
3. Christ rose again on the eighth day. His resurrection created the new Paradise, the promise of eternal life again.

I am only giving a breif summery of his points. St. Symeon's book contains a very extensive analysis of these passages, and I highly recommend reading them.

Another extensive commentary on these passages, which I have only started to read are the "Hymns of Paradise," by St. Ephrem the Syrian. From what I have read so far, I have not seen anything that relates to your specific question. But I recommend this book as well.

Feofil


#4 Kosmas Damianides

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Posted 18 September 2005 - 02:50 PM

Dear Brethren,

The measure of man is not man, it is God. Take God out of the picture, and what are you left with? Nothing.

In Christ,

Kosmas


#5 Kosmas Damianides

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Posted 18 September 2005 - 03:00 PM

The 7th day is the day of perfection, in other words, God perfects and sanctifies His creation on this day.

The 8th day has not come yet, it is the day of God's rest (the day of judgement, the day of the final resurrection) Sundays are only a prefiguration of this very great day we all expect to come. We live in the 7th Day because our Lord has sanctified us and perfected us through baptism and his blood, but there are those evil spirits who wish to bring us back to the "number of man" the 6th day which is not sanctified, which is not perfected.

St Basil talks about the 8th Day..it is a very interesting theology. Other saints also talk of it.


#6 Guest_patrick oshana

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Posted 18 September 2005 - 04:21 PM

I just want to know if anyone has heard of the mythological view on the genesis story and if anyone has heard of the gilgamesh creation story.


#7 Theopesta

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Posted 19 September 2005 - 12:45 AM

from my weak knowledge Gilgamesh tablets use as archeological indication of the universal of the floods of water which present in the GENSIS written by the akadic language they were discovered in the 50s of the 19th century their is a book about antiquities and old testament by: MYRIL ANGER he write about the likeness and diferences between this story and the flood in the GENSIS

the presence of such myths about a flood nearly in each countery indicate the historical correctness of the old testament may be these web sits help your honour to know more

http://www.bible-his...mesh_Tablet.htm
http://gilgamesh.ifo...nfo/default.asp

in one christ

#8 M.C. Steenberg

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Posted 20 September 2005 - 09:30 AM

Dear Patrick, you wrote:

I just want to know if anyone has heard of the mythological view on the genesis story and if anyone has heard of the gilgamesh creation story.


Yes to part two, on Gilgamesh; but as to part one, one whether one has heard of the mythological view of the Genesis story -- I wonder if you would specify a bit more what you mean? Is there a particular view you are referring to? And what do you mean by your use of the term 'mythological', which can have a number of implications, both positive and negative?

INXC, Matthew

#9 Guest_patrick oshana

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Posted 22 September 2005 - 04:12 PM

mythological meaning it explains a certain truth. Some jews believe that the creation story was written because the jews started believing babolonian myths when they were in exile there.

In the bible it talks about how god creates the sun,the sea creatures etc, and in the gilgamesh story the sea creatures and the sun are gods,but the account in the bible talks about one god creating these so called gods,the sun,the sea creatures and so what they were trying to say is dont believe in these so called gods because our one true god created these so called gods.

#10 M.C. Steenberg

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Posted 25 September 2005 - 12:54 PM

Dear Patrick,

Thank you for the clarification. You had originally asked 'if anyone has heard of the mythological view on the genesis story', and as I said in response, it's hard to answer such a question without knowing which 'the' is being referred to, as they are many mythological readings of that account. I've not heard of the specific reading you recounted in your most recent post (that of a deliberate interpretive reading to counter points in the Gilgamesh epic); but comparisons with that epic (and others) are common and interesting, revealing at the very least a much wider tradition of these accounts of 'beginnings' than is often understood, with, despite radical differences, much of common heritage. But then, the assumption of Christians is that there truly was a cosmic origination, a real beginning, from which all 'tribes and nations' descend. It is no great surprise, in such a context, that there would be common points across otherwise very different histories.

The question of 'myth' and 'mythological' is another, but closely related, point. Too often people - especially Orthodox people - cringe when hearing the term 'myth' applied to the creation saga of Genesis, as if myth meant lie, or fable, or fabrication. Certain fathers are generally cited, who read the narrative as literal history of exact detail. Typically, however, the great corpus and larger context of patristic tradition is ignored, which sees in the mythos of the saga the same kind of authentic truth encountered in an icon.

INXC, Matthew


#11 M. Partyka

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Posted 24 January 2008 - 05:19 AM

I refer you to "On the Mystical Life.' by St. Symeon the New Theologian.

He comments extensively on the creation passage in the book of Genesis. He points out the following:

1. Man was created on the sixth day. Not Adam, but Man in general. So no pre-Adamic men.
2. All that God had created from days 1-6 was handed over to Man, as his dominion.
3. Paradise was created on the eighth day, after man had been given his dominion. So Paradise was not included under Man's rule.

This is interesting. I'm curious to know, when does St. Symeon locate Adam in history? Is he saying that Adam was created after Man in general -- a special creation on day eight, perhaps?

#12 Anthony Cornett

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Posted 01 July 2015 - 04:10 PM

I know this is old, but St. Symeon is clear that the First-Created Man is Adam, hence: http://www.amazon.co...n/dp/0938635115



#13 Kosta

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Posted 01 July 2015 - 10:22 PM

I think there is confusion on terminology. The word Adam is hebrew for anthropos. And the greek anthropo entymologically can mean upright creature (See Gen 5.2)

From the one hypostasis of anthropos came forth male and female. And now through procreative act we multiply. Procreation is sort of a capitulation back to the one. The two become one merging and bringing forth a third.




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