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Odd question: is our mortality sin?


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#1 James Burge

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Posted 23 May 2011 - 08:55 PM

I have been looking at Romans 3:23 for all have sinned and fall short of the glory of God.

From what I have been told, the Glory of God is righteousness and eternal life.

So does this mean our mortality is sin, but not the final stage of or mortality which is death?

#2 Herman Blaydoe

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Posted 23 May 2011 - 09:56 PM

Our mortality is due to sin, it is the symptom or the result but it is not the sickness itself.

Or so it seems to this bear of little brain.

Herman the Pooh

#3 Father David Moser

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Posted 23 May 2011 - 10:08 PM

Mortality - or as it is more commonly referenced in Patristic writings, corruption - is not a sin, but is the consequence of the fall.

Fr David Moser

#4 James Burge

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Posted 25 May 2011 - 02:17 AM

Mortality - or as it is more commonly referenced in Patristic writings, corruption - is not a sin, but is the consequence of the fall.

Fr David Moser


Thank you for the answer. I do have another question. In the NT there are three different Greek words translated into English as sin, hamartanō, hamartēma, hamartia. What are the differences and why three different words if they essentially all mean the same?

#5 Olga

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Posted 25 May 2011 - 10:30 AM

James, they are simply different grammatical forms of the same word:

hamartano: I sin (verb, first person)

hamartēma: the act of sinning (noun)

hamartia: sin (noun)

Declensions such as these are common in most languages, ancient and modern. English is one of the few which has largely done away with them, hence your understandable confusion. :-)

#6 Bryan J. Maloney

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Posted 27 August 2011 - 05:25 PM

And, to extend this, the word comes from a verb that literally means "to miss the mark". This cannot be emphasized enough to us Westerners who are brainwashed from birth to believe that "sin" means "intentional spiritual criminal act". Anything we choose that falls short of perfection is a "sin", but it is not the same thing as saying anything we choose that falls short of perfection is some sort of criminal act. We are to be contrite, not guilt-ridden. Constantly wearing guilt like a garment is a sure way to slip into akedia. Contrition, on the other hand, is a spur to improvement.




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