Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

Do you think vocal praise of God literally repels Satan?


  • Please log in to reply
17 replies to this topic

#1 Brad D.

Brad D.

    Regular Poster

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 244 posts
  • Guest from Another Religious Tradition

Posted 26 October 2011 - 03:10 AM

A friend of mine made a post on Facebook today that got me to thinking. She said something along the lines of "If you want to keep the enemy away from you, praise God outloud all the time. The enemy will not want to hear such things and will flee."

My thinking is that Satan probably is not as delicate as that...as to flee upon hearing someone speak of the glory of God. There are certainly ways of repelling the enemy, prayer and the like...but simply declaring the glory of God in songs of praise does not seem to me to be a direct method. Am I being callous? That seems like a nice saying, or motto, but I am unsure of the efficacy of such a plan.

Interested to hear your thoughts...strange question, perhaps.

Brad

#2 Antonios

Antonios

    Very Frequent Poster

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,039 posts
  • Orthodox Christian Member

Posted 26 October 2011 - 03:26 AM

It has to do with the heart. Vocal prayer with purity in heart is very powerful, and demons have been known to flee at the sound of it. The key words being 'with purity in heart'.

#3 IoanC

IoanC

    Regular Poster

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 160 posts
  • Orthodox Christian Member

Posted 26 October 2011 - 07:27 AM

Like Antonios said, the vocal prayer needs to be accompanied by purity of heart and faith in God, and not reliance on our own powers, nor the actual formula of the prayer. It is the Grace of God that makes demons flee, not us. If we relied totally on ourselves or the text by itself, like you said, the devil would take advantage of our pride and continue to bother us.

#4 Marie+Duquette

Marie+Duquette

    Frequent Poster

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 302 posts
  • Orthodox Christian Member

Posted 26 October 2011 - 03:36 PM

Like Antonios said, the vocal prayer needs to be accompanied by purity of heart and faith in God, and not reliance on our own powers, nor the actual formula of the prayer. It is the Grace of God that makes demons flee, not us. If we relied totally on ourselves or the text by itself, like you said, the devil would take advantage of our pride and continue to bother us.


Mr Ioan, thank you for the above post! "purity of heart"! it all sound so simple! This pushed me to look up references to "purity of heart" in the Monachos archives. This term is mentioned a lot here; and yet, I wonder how the term "PURITY of HEART" is understood? Antonios in his post # 2 emphasis that "The key word being 'with purity of heart'"! I don't find a particular thread on this subject/topic of "purity of heart", though the Fathers speak of it extensively in their writings. This would make a profitable Thread, not only in relation to the repelling of Satan, but especially in the living of our daily lives. Even Jesus in the Gospels speaks of "purity of heart" in His "Blessed are the pure in heart, for they shall see God," Semon on the Mount/Beatitudes.

What is truly meant by "Purity of Heart"?

Thank you?

Edited by Marie+Duquette, 26 October 2011 - 03:39 PM.
spelling


#5 IoanC

IoanC

    Regular Poster

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 160 posts
  • Orthodox Christian Member

Posted 26 October 2011 - 03:53 PM

Mr Ioan, thank you for the above post! "purity of heart"! it all sound so simple! This pushed me to look up references to "purity of heart" in the Monachos archives. This term is mentioned a lot here; and yet, I wonder how the term "PURITY of HEART" is understood? Antonios in his post # 2 emphasis that "The key word being 'with purity of heart'"! I don't find a particular thread on this subject/topic of "purity of heart", though the Fathers speak of it extensively in their writings. This would make a profitable Thread, not only in relation to the repelling of Satan, but especially in the living of our daily lives. Even Jesus in the Gospels speaks of "purity of heart" in His "Blessed are the pure in heart, for they shall see God," Semon on the Mount/Beatitudes.

What is truly meant by "Purity of Heart"?

Thank you?


I will respond simply. Purity of heart means that our heart is clean of passions, such as pride, selfish demands, judging of others, envy, so on, and that we are actually humble, decent, honest, peaceful, loving; in a way, it is a clean attitude or state of the heart.

#6 Brad D.

Brad D.

    Regular Poster

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 244 posts
  • Guest from Another Religious Tradition

Posted 27 October 2011 - 02:21 AM

Thank you all very much for your thoughts! Very interesting. I suppose I agree that at times when we are truly pouring forth praise to God from a pure heart, Satan likely would be expelled by the presence of God, for a time. I wish we had the capability to truly live in that state.

#7 Rob Bergen

Rob Bergen

    Regular Poster

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 74 posts

Posted 27 October 2011 - 03:11 AM

Thank you all very much for your thoughts! Very interesting. I suppose I agree that at times when we are truly pouring forth praise to God from a pure heart, Satan likely would be expelled by the presence of God, for a time. I wish we had the capability to truly live in that state.


Unless you subscribe to the Calvinist doctrine of Total Depravity, we do live in a state where it is possible to have a pure heart. The blessed Theotokos lived in a state of pureness of heart. We are certainly capable of living with pure hearts, the problem is our own understanding of how to live that life. Christ Jesus, Son of God, became incarnate to elevate our humanity to the point where we can achieve pure hearts, by His grace and through the sacraments, where His grace is bestowed upon us. An excellent book on this subject was written by Fr. Schmemann, memory eternal, called For the Life of the World.

The Devil cannot stand against the power of God, and indeed, the Love of God!

Rob

#8 Paul Cowan

Paul Cowan

    Very Frequent Poster

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,064 posts
  • Orthodox Christian Member

Posted 27 October 2011 - 03:26 AM

I will respond simply. Purity of heart means that our heart is clean of passions, such as pride, selfish demands, judging of others, envy, so on, and that we are actually humble, decent, honest, peaceful, loving; in a way, it is a clean attitude or state of the heart.


The only time I am in this state of mind is when I am asleep. We have a high watermark to strive for. I have trouble even seeing it.

#9 Brad D.

Brad D.

    Regular Poster

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 244 posts
  • Guest from Another Religious Tradition

Posted 27 October 2011 - 11:13 AM

Unless you subscribe to the Calvinist doctrine of Total Depravity, we do live in a state where it is possible to have a pure heart. The blessed Theotokos lived in a state of pureness of heart. We are certainly capable of living with pure hearts, the problem is our own understanding of how to live that life. Christ Jesus, Son of God, became incarnate to elevate our humanity to the point where we can achieve pure hearts, by His grace and through the sacraments, where His grace is bestowed upon us. An excellent book on this subject was written by Fr. Schmemann, memory eternal, called For the Life of the World.

The Devil cannot stand against the power of God, and indeed, the Love of God!

Rob


I meant live continuously in that state. Certainly we enter into purity of heart at times, but typically we do not stay there long. Yes, it is a "technical" (I hate that word) possiblility, but few of us come even close to that blessed state. I pray, with a pure heart, that one day I do...one day on earth, that is.

#10 Rob Bergen

Rob Bergen

    Regular Poster

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 74 posts

Posted 27 October 2011 - 01:22 PM

I meant live continuously in that state. Certainly we enter into purity of heart at times, but typically we do not stay there long. Yes, it is a "technical" (I hate that word) possiblility, but few of us come even close to that blessed state. I pray, with a pure heart, that one day I do...one day on earth, that is.


How true. I also pray with you!

Question. Do you think there is a difference between vocal praise and praise within the heart? Or are they they same? Similar? Different? The post mentions "vocal praise," I wonder if it is necessary for vocal praise, when the powers that be are not powers that we can see with our senses?

#11 Herman Blaydoe

Herman Blaydoe

    Moderator

  • Moderators
  • 4,157 posts
  • Orthodox Christian Member

Posted 27 October 2011 - 03:55 PM

There is prayer of the head and prayer of the heart. We strive to move our prayer from our head to our heart. Prayer of the heart is a very specific thing in patristic, monastic, and asthetical writings.

#12 Brad D.

Brad D.

    Regular Poster

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 244 posts
  • Guest from Another Religious Tradition

Posted 28 October 2011 - 11:15 AM

There is prayer of the head and prayer of the heart. We strive to move our prayer from our head to our heart. Prayer of the heart is a very specific thing in patristic, monastic, and asthetical writings.


Hello Herman, Thanks for your reply. But is prayer of the heart the same thing as praise?

Brad

#13 Herman Blaydoe

Herman Blaydoe

    Moderator

  • Moderators
  • 4,157 posts
  • Orthodox Christian Member

Posted 28 October 2011 - 01:34 PM

It is something deeper. We can praise God in our minds and in our hearts. When it is merely an intellectual assent, it is in the mind. When it becomes the core of our being it is in the heart. REAL praise comes from the heart. Our goal is to move our prayer from our minds to our hearts. This is something I personally believe a significant portion of Protestantism misses.

#14 Rob Bergen

Rob Bergen

    Regular Poster

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 74 posts

Posted 28 October 2011 - 04:18 PM

Brad,

If you are interested in prayer, and would like to learn more about the prayer of the heart, I suggest you read The Way of a Pilgrim, written by an anonymous person in the late 18th or 19th century. It is really insightful, and explains a little bit about interior prayer, or prayer of the heart, in a much better way than I can.

Peace be with your spirit!

Rob

#15 Brad D.

Brad D.

    Regular Poster

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 244 posts
  • Guest from Another Religious Tradition

Posted 29 October 2011 - 12:25 PM

Brad,

If you are interested in prayer, and would like to learn more about the prayer of the heart, I suggest you read The Way of a Pilgrim, written by an anonymous person in the late 18th or 19th century. It is really insightful, and explains a little bit about interior prayer, or prayer of the heart, in a much better way than I can.

Peace be with your spirit!

Rob


Many thanks for your reply! I have read The Way of a Pilgrim (well, most of it...I got side-tracked). Very good book! I also have a copy of Dr. Rossi's teachings on The Jesus Prayer. I pray this prayer every day, although not at length as some do. Take care!

Brad

#16 Antonios

Antonios

    Very Frequent Poster

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,039 posts
  • Orthodox Christian Member

Posted 05 November 2011 - 06:57 AM

“If the words of God are uttered merely as verbal expressions, and their message is not rooted in the virtuous way of life of those who utter them, they will not be heard. But if they are uttered through the practice of the commandments, their sound has such power that they dissolve the demons and dispose men eagerly to build their hearts into temples of God through making progress in works of righteousness.”

- St. Maximus the Confessor



#17 Brad D.

Brad D.

    Regular Poster

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 244 posts
  • Guest from Another Religious Tradition

Posted 05 November 2011 - 05:23 PM

“If the words of God are uttered merely as verbal expressions, and their message is not rooted in the virtuous way of life of those who utter them, they will not be heard. But if they are uttered through the practice of the commandments, their sound has such power that they dissolve the demons and dispose men eagerly to build their hearts into temples of God through making progress in works of righteousness.”

- St. Maximus the Confessor


Wonderful quotation. Thank you!

#18 Forrest Slice

Forrest Slice

    Junior Poster

  • Members
  • 5 posts

Posted 01 December 2011 - 04:08 AM

It does not have to be done something out loud. As I personally think that the one who keeps on saying how strong his faith is, will be the one tested the most until he breaks. And knowing the nature of Satan, I would not think twice about him being present even to those who are utmost close and personal with God. It probably means that you repel him for yourself but not to the point of him giving up on testing.




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users