Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

whistling calls the demons?


  • Please log in to reply
28 replies to this topic

#1 Jesse Dominick

Jesse Dominick

    Regular Poster

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 83 posts

Posted 31 January 2012 - 03:54 PM

has anyone ever heard that whistling calls demons? if so, do you know what the origin of this thought is? im not saying i wholly believe it, but i would assume it has its origin in something legitimate.

anyways, i ask because i dont like when stuff is labeled as "yia yia" or "baba" theology just so we can dismiss it with a laugh. they come from cultures that were formed in an Orthodox ethos, so I can't say, based on my 20th/21st century American experience, that they are necessarily and wholly absurd.

#2 Alice

Alice

    Very Frequent Poster

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 673 posts
  • Orthodox Christian Member

Posted 31 January 2012 - 04:26 PM

I never heard this with any of my Greek relatives.

When I had laryngitis once, I couldn't speak to get anyone in my family's attention (and with two spirited little children that was very frustrating), so I would give a quick whistle instead! Hehehe!

Perhap because it is generally bad manners to whistle, this was made up by parents to discourage it in their children? Let's not forget that living in Orthodox countries years ago was a time when religion (and superstition) was everything, and pervaded everyday life in every aspect.

I agree with you that many yiayialogies are not absurd and may have some deeper meaning or contextual meaning, but I am not sure about this one.

#3 Kusanagi

Kusanagi

    Very Frequent Poster

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 716 posts

Posted 31 January 2012 - 04:36 PM

Some demons tempted the ascetics in the Egyptian desert by whistling.

#4 Jesse Dominick

Jesse Dominick

    Regular Poster

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 83 posts

Posted 31 January 2012 - 04:40 PM

i just asked Matushka Olga Atty- she said the reasoning is that whistling indicates idleness and spiritual idleness invites demonic influence

#5 Herman Blaydoe

Herman Blaydoe

    Moderator

  • Moderators
  • 4,157 posts
  • Orthodox Christian Member

Posted 31 January 2012 - 05:15 PM

Being a former Navy officer, the call of the bosun's Pipe, which is an ancient whistle used aboard ships to issue commands for centuries doesn't seem demonic. I don't know about summoning demons but I used it to summon my children scattered around the neighborhood. I never saw demons appear but sailors and children can be rather naughty at times. Does that count?

Herman the nautical Pooh

#6 IoanC

IoanC

    Regular Poster

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 160 posts
  • Orthodox Christian Member

Posted 01 February 2012 - 06:48 AM

Any activity that is not pleasing to God (in part, or in whole) will basically call demons, or ask them to stay. Any worldly deed will accomplish that, even if it seems to be partly good.

#7 Leah

Leah

    Regular Poster

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 31 posts
  • Orthodox Christian Member

Posted 28 April 2012 - 05:13 PM

My Great granie, used to say" A whistling woman, and a crowing hen are no good to God nor men" ...I wonder if there is a link to your question.She was born in 1890,so it was an old fashioned saying that could have had superstitous roots.

#8 Paul Cowan

Paul Cowan

    Very Frequent Poster

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,064 posts
  • Orthodox Christian Member

Posted 28 April 2012 - 09:16 PM

whistling calls the demons?

yes, it does. The first is named Simba and the second is named Angel Boy. A 8 year old pomeranian and a 5 1/2 year old Chihuhua mix. Yes, absolutely, demons from HELL! If I whistle and only have one bowl of food, watch out.

#9 Bryan J. Maloney

Bryan J. Maloney

    Very Frequent Poster

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 364 posts
  • Orthodox Christian Member

Posted 05 May 2012 - 04:51 PM

Gluttony is a deadly passion. Does that mean we should never eat?

#10 Richard A. Downing

Richard A. Downing

    Frequent Poster

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 240 posts
  • Orthodox Christian Member

Posted 05 May 2012 - 08:49 PM

OK, I have a theory. Orthodox chants are catchy. If you live in a time of persecution and start whistling, unconsciously like I do at times, then it's a clear advert. Maybe this comes from such a time? Say under the Turks.

R.

#11 Herman Blaydoe

Herman Blaydoe

    Moderator

  • Moderators
  • 4,157 posts
  • Orthodox Christian Member

Posted 05 May 2012 - 10:13 PM

Gluttony is a deadly passion. Does that mean we should never eat?

If you cannot eat without being gluttonous, then perhaps yes? I have no idea what this has to do with either whistling or demons however.

Not a sermon, just a thought.

#12 Paul Cowan

Paul Cowan

    Very Frequent Poster

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,064 posts
  • Orthodox Christian Member

Posted 06 May 2012 - 02:50 AM

Gluttony is a deadly passion. Does that mean we should never eat?


Eating does not lead to gluttony. Eating to excess leads to gluttony. Big difference

Paul

#13 Bryan J. Maloney

Bryan J. Maloney

    Very Frequent Poster

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 364 posts
  • Orthodox Christian Member

Posted 13 May 2012 - 04:49 PM

And, now, let us go back to whistling. Spare time leads to sloth. Therefore we must always be slaving like dogs on chains, never daring to whistle, smile, or sit!

This anti-whistling campaign is just a folk superstition, like the "evil eye" or tea leaf reading.

#14 Bryan J. Maloney

Bryan J. Maloney

    Very Frequent Poster

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 364 posts
  • Orthodox Christian Member

Posted 13 May 2012 - 04:49 PM

If you cannot eat without being gluttonous, then perhaps yes?


Therefore, by this reasoning, God wants some of us to starve ourselves to death--how very Gnostic/Albigensian/Bogomil...

#15 Herman Blaydoe

Herman Blaydoe

    Moderator

  • Moderators
  • 4,157 posts
  • Orthodox Christian Member

Posted 13 May 2012 - 05:33 PM

I think you are stretching the "reasoning" well beyond reason. For what reason I wonder?

#16 Steve Roche

Steve Roche

    Frequent Poster

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 201 posts

Posted 24 May 2012 - 10:38 PM

Apparently a common practice of early Christians was to “hiss” at demons. Emperor Julian (the Apostate) states of Christians: “these two things are the quintessence of their theology, to hiss at demons and make the sign of the cross on their foreheads.” (Letters, Emperor Julian, To a Priest, 19) Julian does not say specifically if this was a practice of Nicene Christians (Galileans), Arians, or both. The context suggests that of Nicene Christians.

Steve

#17 Etsi JC Brigid W.

Etsi JC Brigid W.

    Regular Poster

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 51 posts

Posted 01 June 2012 - 01:32 PM

i just asked Matushka Olga Atty- she said the reasoning is that whistling indicates idleness and spiritual idleness invites demonic influence


Wow, haven't heard of "whistle while you work", has she? I've been known to whistle or sing while working.

#18 Steve Roche

Steve Roche

    Frequent Poster

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 201 posts

Posted 01 June 2012 - 06:13 PM

The idea of whistling associated with demons likely came from Paedagogus and Athanasius…

Athanasius (Life of Anthony):

For the demons do all things --they prate, they confuse, they dissemble, they confound--to deceive the simple. They din, laugh madly, and whistle; but if no heed is paid to them forthwith they weep and lament as though vanquished.” (Chapter 26, see also chapter 39)

Paedagogus (The Instructor, Chapter 7):

“Further, eradicating frivolousness, beginning with God, it lays down the law for our regulation somewhat thus: "Do not repeat your words in your prayer." Chirruping and whistling, and sounds made through the fingers, by which domestics are called, being irrational signs, are to be given up by rational men. Frequent spitting, too, and violent clearing of the throat, and wiping one's nose at an entertainment, are to be shunned. For respect is assuredly to be had to the guests, lest they turn in disgust from such filthiness, which argues want of restraint. For we are not to copy oxen and asses, whose manger and dunghill are together. For many wipe their noses and spit even whilst supping.”

“If anyone is attacked with sneezing, just as in the case of hiccup, he must not startle those near him with the explosion, and so give proof of his bad breeding; but the hiccup is to be quietly transmitted with the expiration of the breath, the mouth being composed becomingly, and not gaping and yawning like the tragic masks. So the disturbance of hiccup may be avoided by making the respirations gently; for thus the threatening symptoms of the ball of wind will be dissipated in the most seemly way, by managing its egress so as also to conceal anything which the air forcibly expelled may bring up with it. To wish to add to the noises, instead of diminishing them, is the sign of arrogance and disorderliness. Those, too, who scrape their teeth, bleeding the wounds, are disagreeable to themselves and detestable to their neighbours. Scratching the ears and the irritation of sneezing are swinish itchings, and attend unbridled fornication. Both shameful sights and shameful conversation about them are to be shunned. Let the look be steady, and the turning and movement of the neck, and the motions of the hands in conversation, be decorous. In a word, the Christian is characterized by composure, tranquillity, calmness, and peace.”

Alternatively; Clement of Alexandria (To the Heathen):

“Thus dogs that have strayed, track out their master by the scent; and horses that have thrown their riders, come to their master's call if he but whistle.”

Gregory of Nyssa (Answer to Eunomius):

“For we ourselves are accustomed to direct brute beasts by clucking and whistling and the like, and yet this, by which we reach their ears, is not our language, but we use our natural speech in talking to one another, while, in regard to cattle, some suitable noise or sound accompanied with gesture is sufficient for all purposes of communication.”

Jerome (Letter 46):

“These are the songs of the country; these, in popular phrase, its love ditties: these the shepherd whistles; these the tiller uses to aid his toil”

See also Gregory Nazianzen, Oration 2, 44.

#19 George Y

George Y

    Regular Poster

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 23 posts

Posted 20 July 2012 - 03:58 AM

When I was in high school, I went to the home of a Greek friend after school. While in his house, I whistled a tune and he told me to stop. He said his mother doesn't allow whistling because it brings demons. I stopped whistling out of polite respect, but after giving this much consideration of the years, I had come to the conclusion someone made up the idea to stop another person's annoying whistling.

I never considered that there was any merit to the idea...

#20 Antonios

Antonios

    Very Frequent Poster

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,039 posts
  • Orthodox Christian Member

Posted 20 July 2012 - 08:44 AM

Not only whistling, but many things we do attract the demons.




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users