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Daily Vespers videos?


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#1 Brad D.

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Posted 10 February 2012 - 12:16 PM

Does anyone have a link to a site that has video of the daily services in the Orthodox Church? I have found some that do a live broadcast of weekend services, but daily services are not available Well, and those are only live broadcasts, not recordings...I really need recorded services due to time-zone differences.

Brad

#2 Fr Raphael Vereshack

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Posted 10 February 2012 - 03:14 PM

These will be a challenge to find since normally in N America the daily services are only done in monasteries, some major cathedrals, but in very few parishes. The subdued tone of these services, with little liturgical movement as compared to Great Vespers and festal services, means that daily services would be a challenge to film or watch. Perhaps they would be better to listen to.

In Christ
-Fr Raphael

#3 Brad D.

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Posted 10 February 2012 - 03:25 PM

I see... I wonder if there is a CD set of the services somewhere.

#4 Brad D.

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Posted 10 February 2012 - 03:31 PM

I found this: http://www.amazon.co...t/dp/B000EBFLIQ Would this be in any way near what I am looking for?

#5 Fr Raphael Vereshack

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Posted 10 February 2012 - 03:49 PM

These are mainly hymns done at the Saturday Vigil/Sunday Liturgy during Great Lent. Some of the selections also come from Holy Week or the Great Canon of St Andrew.

Except for the troparia at Great Compline these aren't the daily services of Great Lent.

Note though that by 'daily services' we actually mean the services normally done Mon-Saturday. These have their own special structure as compared to the services of Saturday evening, Sunday morning.

I know it sounds wild- but I wonder if we could arrange for the reading of these daily services via Skype or some internet media that would allow simultaneous listening once Great Lent begins? Several of us know how to do these services so I think from this angle this is possible. We'd just have to look into the technical angle and see if it could work. I know I'd be willing to help.

Mike Stckles might best know of an internet media that allows for simultaneous listening in/participation.

In Christ
-Fr Raphael

#6 Brad D.

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Posted 10 February 2012 - 03:57 PM

That would be great! PLEASE record them though! Or, Lord willing, maybe they would be done at a time I could listen....

#7 Michael 'Anthony' Cornett

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Posted 10 February 2012 - 04:35 PM

As it has been mentioned, there are so many variables to the daily services that a CD would only capture that particular service minus the variables, which are every-bit as important as the rest. If you don't mind me asking, where are you located?

Thanks,
Anthony

EDIT: A quick glance at your profile would help ;) Elmore City, OK, unless things have changed? Are you in contact with Holy Ascension Antiochian Church in Norman, OK? Seems to be about 45 miles away from your stated locale. http://holyascensionnorman.org/

Edited by Michael 'Anthony' Cornett, 10 February 2012 - 04:38 PM.
my laziness got in the way ;)


#8 Fr Raphael Vereshack

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Posted 10 February 2012 - 04:36 PM

PLEASE record them though!

The problem here though is that there movable parts to the service (stichiri and aposticha at vespers) which are different every day and which speak to particular themes and also the specific saint of the day. That's why an online English Vespers even if only done as a readers' service would be a very good thing I think.

-Fr Raphael

#9 Father David Moser

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Posted 10 February 2012 - 08:44 PM

I appreciate Brad's desire to chant the daily services, however, it is almost impossible to do "by the book" alone. It is something that is best learned by working with someone already accomplished in doing so. When I was first ordained with a tiny mission parish, I can recall trying to put together the services and I recall the extreme frustration of trying to do it without help, just using the directions in the book. The services are really a "corporate" act and best learned in a "live" situation.

Daily vespers is actually one of the easiest of the services to learn. The variable parts are pretty limited and they are, for the most part readily available in English. Probably the biggest thing that can't be learned from a book is the music - how and when to chant, what to sing and what melody to use in singing it. This is also the place where "local tradition" comes into play as each different national tradition has its own set (or sets) of melodies and having learned Byzantine chant doesn't really help at all with the Slavic chants (unless you have a real musical ear and an ability to hear the underlying structure).

I really really have to second Fr Raphael's earlier suggestion to invest the time to visit a nearby monastery or parish where those services are sung and to learn from the reader/choir master how it all works. Even a week of instruction will go a long way to making things much much easier. Even after 30+ years as a clergyman, I can tell you that I still learn alot by standing on the kliros and singing with the canonarch at the cathedral (at our semiannual pastoral meetings). He is the master of all this, and every time I learn a little bit more from him. Then I have to take what I've learned and go home and practice, practice, practice.

Fr David

#10 Brad D.

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Posted 10 February 2012 - 08:50 PM

As it has been mentioned, there are so many variables to the daily services that a CD would only capture that particular service minus the variables, which are every-bit as important as the rest. If you don't mind me asking, where are you located?

Thanks,
Anthony

EDIT: A quick glance at your profile would help ;) Elmore City, OK, unless things have changed? Are you in contact with Holy Ascension Antiochian Church in Norman, OK? Seems to be about 45 miles away from your stated locale. http://holyascensionnorman.org/


I have spoke with Father Justin by phone and email several times. A member of my congregation is in a nursing home in Norman, and we have tried to get together when I am up there visiting, but things keep getting in the way. We still hope and plan to meet up soon. That being said, it would be almost impossible for me to attend services there during the week, due to my business being almost two-hours away from there... Whenever I take a vacation from my job at the Church for a weekend, I intend to try and attend a service with them. I hope that can happen, I would love to.

Brad

#11 Brad D.

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Posted 10 February 2012 - 08:54 PM

I appreciate Brad's desire to chant the daily services, however, it is almost impossible to do "by the book" alone. It is something that is best learned by working with someone already accomplished in doing so. When I was first ordained with a tiny mission parish, I can recall trying to put together the services and I recall the extreme frustration of trying to do it without help, just using the directions in the book. The services are really a "corporate" act and best learned in a "live" situation.

Daily vespers is actually one of the easiest of the services to learn. The variable parts are pretty limited and they are, for the most part readily available in English. Probably the biggest thing that can't be learned from a book is the music - how and when to chant, what to sing and what melody to use in singing it. This is also the place where "local tradition" comes into play as each different national tradition has its own set (or sets) of melodies and having learned Byzantine chant doesn't really help at all with the Slavic chants (unless you have a real musical ear and an ability to hear the underlying structure).

I really really have to second Fr Raphael's earlier suggestion to invest the time to visit a nearby monastery or parish where those services are sung and to learn from the reader/choir master how it all works. Even a week of instruction will go a long way to making things much much easier. Even after 30+ years as a clergyman, I can tell you that I still learn alot by standing on the kliros and singing with the canonarch at the cathedral (at our semiannual pastoral meetings). He is the master of all this, and every time I learn a little bit more from him. Then I have to take what I've learned and go home and practice, practice, practice.

Fr David


Fr David thank you very much for your advice and thoughts. I would love to do as such, but it doesn't appear to be feasible at present with my current situation. However, on April 1st I will be newly self-employed, and so every other Saturday evening I may be able to get up to Norman to attend vespers! Actually, I hadn't thought of that...now I am even more excited for April 1st to come. Perhaps I can attend every other Saturday vespers (I have my kids every other weekend)...that would be great!

Brad

#12 Michael Stickles

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Posted 11 February 2012 - 12:34 AM

Mike Stckles might best know of an internet media that allows for simultaneous listening in/participation.


Well, there are a lot of them, but the ones I know of are either (a) for one-on-one or small groups (like Skype), or (b) can get pricey. I thought of Microsoft Netmeeting as soon as I read your post, but unfortunately support for it was discontinued and it isn't available for the latest versions of Windows (Vista or Win7), plus I don't know if a Mac-compatible version was ever made.

Also, as for participation - for any of these online services, time lags are common. Trying to sing along audibly with a service would be almost impossible - you might be singing along in time with what you hear, but at the other end they hear you coming in a second or two late.

Back to recordings - there are a large number of recordings of Orthodox Vespers services online (first link is a Google search for YouTube vids, second is for vids anywhere else), of varying quality. However, most (if not all) appear to be Great Vespers or Vespers for a feast; I didn't see any that I could definitely identify as daily vespers (not that I checked thoroughly).

#13 Michael Stickles

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Posted 11 February 2012 - 12:44 AM

Quick note: while looking through a few of the video listings I saw some at a service called UStream that lets you do streaming live video. Apparently several Orthodox churches use it to broadcast their services. Participation is kind of limited (sure, you can sing along if you want, but no one there and none of the other viewers will hear you), but that might be the most technically and financially feasible option for doing livecasts of services.

#14 Richard A. Downing

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Posted 11 February 2012 - 08:03 AM

I would love to see some resource on-line that would make saying daily reader offices easier.

It's all very well for a monastery, they have all the books and experts to use them, not to mention an apprenticeship that can last a lifetime... If only one would 'on-line' their services every day, just a list would do.

It takes me longer to research a proper service than to say it. At the moment I limit myself to an 'empty' Matins and Vespers every day - that is with no Troparia or Stiki, just Kathismata and Bible readings. I am retired, so have more time than most, but even this is a serious effort, and I fail often.

With the Triodion period it gets even more difficult, especially since the Triodion Supplement has been out of print here in Europe for some time. But I am looking forward to St Ephraim again, better than Callisthenics IMO :-)

Once the Sacristan's function is fixed, we can think about actually recording them. Can I also support Fr Raphael's suggestion/wish from #5 ? After listening to the experts, I too would be willing to help.

Love,
Richard.

#15 Fr Raphael Vereshack

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Posted 11 February 2012 - 01:06 PM

Quick note: while looking through a few of the video listings I saw some at a service called UStream that lets you do streaming live video. Apparently several Orthodox churches use it to broadcast their services. Participation is kind of limited (sure, you can sing along if you want, but no one there and none of the other viewers will hear you), but that might be the most technically and financially feasible option for doing livecasts of services.


What I was thinking of was an online media that would allow one person at one location to read the Vespers, and that also allowed others to connect to this, to listen in (not really participate; it would get too awkward) if they want.

In Christ
-Fr Raphael

#16 Fr Raphael Vereshack

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Posted 11 February 2012 - 01:10 PM

I would love to see some resource on-line that would make saying daily reader offices easier.

It's all very well for a monastery, they have all the books and experts to use them, not to mention an apprenticeship that can last a lifetime... If only one would 'on-line' their services every day, just a list would do.

It takes me longer to research a proper service than to say it. At the moment I limit myself to an 'empty' Matins and Vespers every day - that is with no Troparia or Stiki, just Kathismata and Bible readings. I am retired, so have more time than most, but even this is a serious effort, and I fail often.

With the Triodion period it gets even more difficult, especially since the Triodion Supplement has been out of print here in Europe for some time. But I am looking forward to St Ephraim again, better than Callisthenics IMO :-)

Can I also support Fr Raphael's suggestion/wish from #5 ? After listening to the experts, I too would be willing to help.

Love,
Richard.



I have been doing reader's daily vespers for many years, so I have a basic understanding of how they work. The strength of them since you're often in such a simple setting when you do them (you don't even have to be in the church), is that you can stop and explain things as you go along.

#17 Niko T.

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Posted 11 February 2012 - 01:23 PM

If you are willing to listen to services in Greek (and on a time delay from when they would be normally celebrated), you should know that there are a number of TV / radio stations which broadcast services every day, in addition to special services for feast days. I've included links to some below and their schedules in Greece (add on 7 hours for the Eastern Time Zone, for example).

-TV4e (An excellent TV station from Thessaloniki, many services are broadcast from the Church of St. Lydia, Asprovalta, Thessaloniki; it is worth noting that they air many feast days from churches/monasteries around Thessaloniki, especially around the feast of St. Demetrios) - Daily schedule - 8AM Orthros, 4PM Paraklesis to various saints, 6PM Vespers, 11:30PM Small Compline (for example of the times in the EST: Orthros 3PM, Paraklesis 11PM, Vespers 1AM, Small Compline 7AM). To start the station, click the link about and and click the blue play button in the center.

-"O Lychnos" (another excellent TV station from Patras; they also tend to air services from various feasts around Patras, especially around the feast of St. Andrew.) Daily Schedule - 5:30m Vespers, 7:30PM Another Vespers service, from the church of St. Nektarios, Patras, 10PM Compline. To start the station, just click the link above.

-The Radio Station of the Church of Greece (based in Athens, the daily services are broadcasted from Moni Petraki. They also will tend to carry major feasts from around Greece, e.g. St. Nektarios Monastery, Aegina) Daily Schedule - 6AM Orthros and Divine Liturgy, 6PM Vespers, 9PM Compline. To start the station, click the icon in the upper left corner that says: "ακούστε ζωντανά!" (Listen Live!)

There are many more stations from Greece, and I'm sure there are many from other countries, but this is a good start. And I think that even if you don't understand Greek, it is good to know that you can still experience church services (albeit from a great distance) every day as needed.

#18 Kyrill Bolton

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Posted 11 February 2012 - 02:20 PM

This site says http://orthodox.seas...st/seaside/home: This site provides dynamic access to an Orthodox Horologion and Psalter. The Psalter is a Septuagint translation called "The Psalter According to the Seventy" by The Holy Transfiguration Monastery. The horologion prayers come from "The Great Horologion" also published by The Holy Transfiguration Monastery. Both are used with their kind permission. Finally the daily Troparion and Kontakion come from the MENOLOGION 3.0 program. Please click on the links on the left to explore the site.

In simple language if you go to the page that says current service there will be the current service be it hours, matins, etc with the daily parts filled in. It does not provide an audio or video presentation nor tell you what part of the service could be chanted, etc. but it is more than adequate for someone wanting to have a dynamic (or current as to the local time of day) 'prayer service.'

Edited by Kyrill Bolton, 11 February 2012 - 02:21 PM.
Just cleaned up the spacing a little


#19 Brad D.

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Posted 11 February 2012 - 03:40 PM

If you are willing to listen to services in Greek (and on a time delay from when they would be normally celebrated), you should know that there are a number of TV / radio stations which broadcast services every day, in addition to special services for feast days. I've included links to some below and their schedules in Greece (add on 7 hours for the Eastern Time Zone, for example).

-TV4e (An excellent TV station from Thessaloniki, many services are broadcast from the Church of St. Lydia, Asprovalta, Thessaloniki; it is worth noting that they air many feast days from churches/monasteries around Thessaloniki, especially around the feast of St. Demetrios) - Daily schedule - 8AM Orthros, 4PM Paraklesis to various saints, 6PM Vespers, 11:30PM Small Compline (for example of the times in the EST: Orthros 3PM, Paraklesis 11PM, Vespers 1AM, Small Compline 7AM). To start the station, click the link about and and click the blue play button in the center.

-"O Lychnos" (another excellent TV station from Patras; they also tend to air services from various feasts around Patras, especially around the feast of St. Andrew.) Daily Schedule - 5:30m Vespers, 7:30PM Another Vespers service, from the church of St. Nektarios, Patras, 10PM Compline. To start the station, just click the link above.

-The Radio Station of the Church of Greece (based in Athens, the daily services are broadcasted from Moni Petraki. They also will tend to carry major feasts from around Greece, e.g. St. Nektarios Monastery, Aegina) Daily Schedule - 6AM Orthros and Divine Liturgy, 6PM Vespers, 9PM Compline. To start the station, click the icon in the upper left corner that says: "ακούστε ζωντανά!" (Listen Live!)

There are many more stations from Greece, and I'm sure there are many from other countries, but this is a good start. And I think that even if you don't understand Greek, it is good to know that you can still experience church services (albeit from a great distance) every day as needed.


Thanks for the links! I may listen to the structure of the services a little bit in Greek, just to get an idea...if you know of any English links please do let me know!

Brad

#20 Brad D.

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Posted 11 February 2012 - 03:41 PM

This site says http://orthodox.seas...st/seaside/home: This site provides dynamic access to an Orthodox Horologion and Psalter. The Psalter is a Septuagint translation called "The Psalter According to the Seventy" by The Holy Transfiguration Monastery. The horologion prayers come from "The Great Horologion" also published by The Holy Transfiguration Monastery. Both are used with their kind permission. Finally the daily Troparion and Kontakion come from the MENOLOGION 3.0 program. Please click on the links on the left to explore the site.

In simple language if you go to the page that says current service there will be the current service be it hours, matins, etc with the daily parts filled in. It does not provide an audio or video presentation nor tell you what part of the service could be chanted, etc. but it is more than adequate for someone wanting to have a dynamic (or current as to the local time of day) 'prayer service.'


Thank you!




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