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#1 Matt Varley

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Posted 22 April 2012 - 09:20 PM

In the Monachos.net banner, left side, in the foreground is a cropped part of what I believe is Marek Czarnecki's icon Christ the Great High Priest. See the full image here.

While it is a very expertly crafted and beautiful image, I wonder whether it departs too far from the canonical norms for this particular icon. The vestments are neither Byzantine nor pontifical. Is this icon worthy of veneration?

#2 Olga

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Posted 23 April 2012 - 01:04 PM

The vestments Christ is wearing are from western tradition, and are indeed pontifical (worn by bishops). The vestment which circles the shoulders, with a strip down the front and back is called a pallium, and is the equivalent of the Byzantine omophorion. The pallium greatly predates the schism between east and west, likely having appeared at least as early as the beginning of the fourth century. While portraying Christ in western vestments is certainly unusual, it is, in itself, not unacceptable.

Marek Czarnecki is Roman Catholic, and much of his work is of post-schism persons and themes from that tradition, and therefore unsuitable for veneration by Orthodox Christians. I find problematic aspects of the icon linked to by Matt are the presence of a post-schism saint in the right-hand border, the unnecessary addition of a stylised crown of thorns in Christ's halo, and the presence of the wounds of the crucifixion in Christ's hands. On this last point, Orthodox tradition only shows Christ bearing the wounds in icons of the Resurrection, and post-Resurrection scenes. Therefore, I would not recommend an Orthodox Christian acquire this image, because of these shortcomings.

#3 Peter Simko

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Posted 23 April 2012 - 04:28 PM

Olga,

Christ is not shown with the Pallium in this particular icon, however, even though the gold pattern nearly replicates where the Pallium would hang in the front. Can Christ be shown as a "mere" priest, or as a deacon in iconography?

Also, the wounds are also shown on Crucifixion icons, of course. Concerning the crown of thorns, on which Orthodox icons would it be appropriate? Just the Bridegroom icon and those showing Christ being mocked?

#4 Rdr Andreas

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Posted 23 April 2012 - 05:44 PM

In view of Olga's comments, one wonders who chose this icon and why.

#5 Herman Blaydoe

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Posted 23 April 2012 - 06:17 PM

Not claiming ANY visibility or influence in such decisions, but I would suspect it might have something to do with it was pretty, suited the color scheme and did not entail copyright issues.

Edited by Herman Blaydoe, 23 April 2012 - 06:37 PM.


#6 Rdr Andreas

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Posted 23 April 2012 - 06:49 PM

Such could be said for very many canonical icons of Christ.

#7 Olga

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Posted 24 April 2012 - 01:16 PM

Christ is not shown with the Pallium in this particular icon, however, even though the gold pattern nearly replicates where the Pallium would hang in the front. Can Christ be shown as a "mere" priest, or as a deacon in iconography?


For some reason, I can no longer open the link to the image mentioned in the OP. Here is a very similar image, from Marek Czarnecki's website. The only difference between this and the one referred to in the OP is the choice of figures in the border - the central panel of Christ is practically identical in both cases:

Attached File  Christ_the_Great_High_Priest.jpg   104.59K   45 downloads

It is clear that Christ is wearing a western-style pallium. This vestment was/is only ever worn by bishops.

#8 Peter Simko

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Posted 24 April 2012 - 02:17 PM

Olga,

I still think you are probably confusing a trimming of the dalmatic, as shown on the priest in the center of this photo: http://marques.silva...ic_tunic_04.jpg

...with a Pallium, which more clearly resembles its Eastern counterpart, the Omophor. Here is what the Western one traditionally looks like:

http://1.bp.blogspot...euesPallium.jpg

or the possibly more ancient one sported by Pope Benedict a few years back:

http://athreadtofoll...ict-Pallium.jpg

So, again, is it proper to have Christ vested this way in iconography?

#9 Matt Varley

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Posted 24 April 2012 - 09:49 PM

Olga,

Do a Google image search using the terms "chasuble orphery" and you will find many examples of the same type of (purely) decorative embroidery portrayed in the icon.

#10 Brian Rowlands

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Posted 25 April 2012 - 02:15 AM

In the examples shown the 'gold' bands on the green vestment are the orphrey - the integral decoration of the vestment which, in this case, is a chasuble. Roman Catholic bishops wear (wore) the tunicle and dalmatic (sometimes combined as a single garment) over the alb and under the chasuble. In these examples the stola is visible at the neck, and appears to be worn uncrossed beneath the chasuble, as appropriate for a bishop - the priest's stole is crossed over the breast.

The pallium is traditionally made of white wool and was originally reserved to the pope; unlike the omophorion it is not worn by all Roman Catholic bishops but only by certain metropolitans and archbishops upon whom it has been specifically conferred (sometimes, in the past, for the exchange of money or other favours). Most commonly it appears from front or back as a large narrow white 'Y' decorated with black crosses, hanging from or over the shoulders. The present Pope appears to have adopted a form of pallium more akin to the omophorion in style but significantly narrower. In contrast many uniate bishops appear to wear an omphorion which is shaped like a western pallium (-O-) rather than a long scarf-like garment folded around the shoulders

In heraldry the pallium may appear in an episcopal coat of arms as a large white 'Y' ornamented with small black crosses. As such it is a dominant feature of the arms of the Metropolitan See of Canterbury (the Archbishop of Canterbury, Primate of All England), which puzzles many as the arms of the Metropolitan See of York (Archbishop of York, the Primate of England), do not have a large 'Y' jumping out from the centre.

I agree with comments 4 and 5 above, although the first image posted does appear to be marked as copyrighted (lower left corner), which possibly does not allow for it to be manipulated or edited.




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