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De-glorification?


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#1 Christophoros

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Posted 02 February 2013 - 02:41 PM

There are reports (including a letter of protest from a ROCOR archpriest in Toronto) that the Moscow Patriarchate has "de-glorified" 36 clergy and monks from the ranks of the Russian New Martyrs.

 

Has this previously occured in the Church, and if so, what were the circumstances?



#2 Fr Raphael Vereshack

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Posted 02 February 2013 - 03:25 PM

St Anna of Kashin was 'decanonized' and then later on 're canonized'. The reasons for the decanonization had to do with how Old Believers were using her as a rallying point to further their cause.

 

In the case of the new martyrs and confessors it needs to be kept in mind that a fairly strict 'bench mark' was set by the MP so that as much as can be ascertained we really are referring to those who consciously laid down their lives for Christ.

 

Note then that in the circumstances that led to the waves of persecutions, some of which during the early days of the revolution were accompanied by many 'para-legal' acts of violence, and others which during later times (eg Yezhov purges of the 1930s) were portrayed in a legal sense as political crimes against the state, it is often difficult to discern the actual cause for their repression. In other words did the repression occur because of active witness to the Faith? Or was it because the person involved simply was a clergyman or monastic? In most cases interrogators would not bring up religious issues but rather fantastic 'plots against the State.'

 

Add to this that it is only gradually that archives with records on those who were arrested are being made available or discovered. And this still leaves us with the chaos of the early days of the revolution when in many cases little or no legal process was followed.

 

In Christ

-Fr Raphael



#3 Herman Blaydoe

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Posted 02 February 2013 - 04:12 PM

It should be remembered that "glorification" is not a magical thing. Saints are saints whether or not the Church happens to acknowledge their sainthood. It is God who grants, we merely acknowledge (or not). Glorified saints are those actual saints that the Church chooses to "promote" for the faithful to inspire, teach, and emulate, as lives pleasing to God. Sometimes saints are "elevated" for other than spiritual reasons. For an egregious example, there are those trying to make saints out of Stalin and even Rasputin for political or cultural reasons. There do need to be standards to fight this sort of thing and perhaps in the excitement and emotion coming out of bondage of the horrors of communism, some examples of sainthood were perhaps injudiciously chosen and now discernment is being applied.

 

If some true saints of God have been mistakenly "removed" from the Church's list, they are still on God's list!



#4 Kosta

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Posted 08 February 2013 - 01:07 PM

I think some of those glorifications were made too hasty.  Dont see why two protestants who were nominal to begin with were glorified simply because they worked for the royal family.


Edited by Kosta, 08 February 2013 - 01:07 PM.


#5 Carolyn C.

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Posted 08 February 2016 - 07:57 AM

My question has to do with an obscure Greek saint.  A friend of mine has asked me to try to find some information about, or an icon of, St. Archonton [also spelled:  St. Arhontion; feminine:  St. Archondia; St. Arhontia], whose feast day is September 3. 

 

      A Greek nameday site lists St. Arhontion, St. Arhontia for September 3.  In the book, "Wondrous is God in His Saints" is listed:  "Sept. 3  St. Archontinus, martyr with St. Chariton".  The "Book of Saints" by Mary P.  Hallick, reads:  "St. Archonton, the word is translated as 'ruler, magistrate'.  September 3 is reserved in memory of St. Archonton, the martyr."  Also:  "Archontisa, feminine of Archonton."  On the internet I found a Greek archeologist named Archondia Thanos.  I found a 2008 obituary for a woman named Archondia Kallergis who was born Archondia Drosos, daughter of Odysseas and Katerini (Pashali) Drosos, in Phili, Kos, Greece circa 1927.  I also found an ad for Archondi Apartments in Kefalos, Kos, Greece. 

 

      My friend's mother is Archondia (Cappas) Karas, daughter of Domnichi (Papaprokopis) Karas, who was born on Kos in 1916 and died in Ohio in 2012.  St. Archonton [Archondia; Arhontion] seems to have been a saint that is especially venerated on the island of Kos.  Theo Kritos Travel Agency told me that there is a small church on Kos with this name, but I haven't been able to get any more information from them in several months. 

 

      Does anyone know anything about saints especially venerated on Kos?  My friend would like to have an icon written of her mother's saint for her nameday on September 3.

 

     I would appreciate any scrap of information.  Thank you so much.



#6 Christophoros

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Posted 08 February 2016 - 02:01 PM

As a side note, I once read that when the MP glorified the New Martyrs/Passion Bearers, they produced an "official" list of some 700-800 names. If it is true, has the list ever been translated?



#7 Rdr Andreas

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Posted 08 February 2016 - 08:06 PM

The canonisation by MP of those who suffered under communism (up until and during the Khrushchev era) is a work in progress so there is no 'official list' as yet. Given the numbers involved, I think it will be a long time before this work is completed, though I have seen the figure of 30,000 as the number so far glorified.


Edited by Rdr Andreas, 08 February 2016 - 08:10 PM.


#8 Christophoros

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Posted 08 February 2016 - 11:56 PM

Here is a reference to the number I was thinking of:

 

HOLY CITIZEN ROMANOV
The church canonized the last Russian emperor
 
by Aleksei Makarkin 
Segodnia, 15 August 2000
 

 

The bishops' council of the Russian Orethodox church yesterday made the decision to enroll in the canon of saints the new martyrs who perished at the hands of the bolsheviks. There are now 860 names in the synaxis of new martyrs. It is especially necessary to note that the group of new saints does not include those clergy and laity who either were informers for the "organs" or denounced either themselves or others.
 


#9 Rdr Andreas

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Posted 09 February 2016 - 11:55 AM

That was sixteen years ago. There are canonisations happening with some regularity, as I know, but they do not get publicity.



#10 Christophoros

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Posted 09 February 2016 - 01:45 PM

That was sixteen years ago. There are canonisations happening with some regularity, as I know, but they do not get publicity.

Yes I know, they are indeed happening regularly and should be! I was asking if the initial list of 860 was ever translated.

 

The total number of New Martyrs who suffered under the Communist yoke will never be known to anyone but Our Lord.



#11 Rdr Andreas

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Posted 09 February 2016 - 08:21 PM

In 2000, the MP glorified 1,760 saints by name and others known only to God. The day of commemoration of the New Martyrs and Confessors of Russia was recently marked. Though not exactly to the point, we may note that six days ago, Archbishop Seraphim (Sobolev) who was Russian but spent some years ministering to Russians in Bulgaria, was canonised during a synodal meeting in Christ the Saviour Cathedral in Moscow.






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