Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

"...among the gods..."?


  • Please log in to reply
6 replies to this topic

#1 Algernon

Algernon

    Regular Poster

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 173 posts
  • Orthodox Christian Member

Posted 12 August 2013 - 02:08 PM

The first of the Prayers of Light said by the priest during Vespers includes the following line:

 

"Thou alone art God, and among the gods there is none like unto thee."

 

​What "gods" is this referring to?

 

Thanks,

A



#2 Rdr Andreas

Rdr Andreas

    Very Frequent Poster

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,033 posts
  • Orthodox Christian Member

Posted 12 August 2013 - 03:01 PM

The ones men had made up.



#3 Algernon

Algernon

    Regular Poster

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 173 posts
  • Orthodox Christian Member

Posted 12 August 2013 - 03:16 PM

So, things that people worship other than God? e.g. money, power, prestige, etc.



#4 Phoebe K.

Phoebe K.

    Regular Poster

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 279 posts
  • Orthodox Christian Member

Posted 12 August 2013 - 03:26 PM

yes,

 

When this pernertion was written Christianity was in the minority and there were many other religions most of which were polytheistic (having multiple gods each with a specific place in the way the world worked).  This was the original reference as see in the Psalms as well which speak about the 'gods' of the nations as apposed to the Lord.  Although it is equally aporeate to consider it as referring to anything that humans put before the Lord in their lives.

 

Phoebe



#5 Father David Moser

Father David Moser

    Moderator

  • Moderators
  • 3,581 posts
  • Orthodox Christian Member
  • Verified Cleric

Posted 12 August 2013 - 05:14 PM

yes,

 

When this pernertion was written Christianity was in the minority

 

Phoebe

 

Actually, when this was written Christianity did not even exist because Christ had not yet come. This line is a quote of Ps 85 vs. 8 (86:8 KJV).  Many of our prayers are composed of direct quotes from the Psalter as this was (and still is) the primary "Prayerbook" of the Church.

 

Fr David Moser



#6 Rdr Daniel (R.)

Rdr Daniel (R.)

    Very Frequent Poster

  • Validating
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 705 posts
  • Orthodox Christian Member

Posted 12 August 2013 - 05:57 PM

As Fr David says it is from Psalm 85, and as the others have said is most likely a reference to the false gods of the nations, in a largely polytheistic world it was important to show how great the Lord was compared with the gods of the nations even though the faithful Israelites themselves knew that there was only one God. 

 

"Among the gods there is none like unto Thee, O Lord, neither are there any works like unto Thy works. All nations whom Thou hast made shall come and worship before Thee, O Lord,  and  shall  glorify  Thy  name. For  Thou  art  great, and doest wondrous things; Thou art God alone" - Psalm 85, Rdr Michael Asser's Old Testament, emphasis mine.

 

In Christ.

Daniel,



#7 Effie Ganatsios

Effie Ganatsios

    Very Frequent Poster

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,725 posts
  • Orthodox Christian Member

Posted 17 August 2013 - 08:06 AM

The Unknown God

In addition to the twelve main gods and the innumerable lesser deities, ancient Greeks worshipped a deity they called Agnostos Theos, that is: the Unknown god. In Athens, there was a temple specifically dedicated to that god and very often Athenians would swear "in the name of the Unknown god" (Νή τόν Άγνωστον Ne ton Agnoston).[1] Apollodorus, Philostratus and Pausanias wrote about the Unknown god as well.[2] The Unknown god was not so much a specific deity, but a placeholder, for whatever god or gods actually existed but whose name and nature were not revealed to the Athenians or the Hellenized world at large.

http://www.princeton...nknown_God.html




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users