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Troparia and kontakia


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#1 Warren Bensinger

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Posted 11 January 2006 - 03:11 PM

Could someone please help me find a site for daily Troparia and Kontakia? Also is there a difference between Kontakia, Kontakion, katavasia and Kathisma? I'm trying to follow daily Matins, Hours and Vespers reader service from Fr. John Whiteford. I found the Troparia and Kontakia for Sat. and Sun. but not for the weekdays.

Also info on the proper Octoechos to sing, the appointed Exapostilaria and stichera and Aposticha and Doxasticon. (definitions of these might help also)
One more thing, it says to read the canon after a particular "ode". (3rd, 6th or 8th) Where would I find that?

As you can see I know very little so a lot of help is needed.

Thanks in advance for the help.
warren
t.s.

#2 Fr Raphael Vereshack

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Posted 11 January 2006 - 05:16 PM

I don't know if there is a site where one can find the daily Troparia & Kondakia. Note however that by 'daily' is properly meant the Octoechos weekday cycle (Mon-Sat) & not those of the Great Feasts, other Menaion feasts and feasts related to the Paschal cycle. If you mean these latter that will make your search a little more complicated.

Kontakia- is plural of Kontakion (or Kondak- Slav). Kontakion is singular (again this is Kondak for the Slavs; made more complicated by the fact that people often combine the two traditions and say "Kontak"!). Katavasia is the hymn sung at the end of an Ode. On great feasts at the end of every ode, on weekdays and not festal (ie without Great Doxology) at the end of 3rd, 6th, 8th & 9th odes. Kathisma (Kafisma- slav): the Orthodox Psalter for reading at services is divided into 20 parts each called a Kathisma (Gk 'to sit' because we may sit when listening to the Kathisma); each Kathisma is divided into 3 Stasis (a Slava in slav); certain Kathisma correspond to certain services and days of the week according to a schedule which can be found in most Orthodox Psalters.

The troparia & kondakia for weekdays are found in the weekday Octoechos- called in Greek- Paraklytike; and also in many standard Orthodox prayerbooks, Book of Hours and also in the Slav Chasoslov or Velikii Sbornik.

For your next two questions I think that it is best to first aquire a good Orthodox liturgical library which I think Fr John Whiteford's site gives suggestions about. When it comes to the services and especially the daily services there is really no replacement for participating in a hands-on way at daily services. And you need to do this for a year or so before getting a basic understanding of how the services are structured. Thankfully apart from monasteries( which obviously many people do not live nearby to) a number of parishes now do daily services. The riches found in these daily services are truly amazing.

In Christ- Fr Raphael


#3 Fr. George Morelli

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Posted 11 January 2006 - 11:45 PM

Dear Fr George,
Perhaps you would be able to post this info to monachos.
Somehow I forgot about this Menologion 2 even though I have it installed on my computer. One small problem is that it doesn't actually use the Tropars and Kondaks as found in the Menaion but are rather compositions from some other source- not too sure which.
I pray you had a wonderful Theophany.
In Christ- Fr Raphael

V.Rev.Fr.George Morelli, Ph.D. wrote:

> Fr Raphael ....Glory to Jesus Christ! ... As you know I follow the new calendar, but the program below is from Menologian 2. [I copy pasted todays page. It also has the Epistle and Gospel readings. I believe the web site is www.menologian.org (or com) ...however it can be accessed through www.theologic.com .. it comes in New and Old Calender versions ...is this what you were looking for in answer to the Monachos question? ...if so I hope this helps ... have a holy and blessed Theophany .... in Christ ..FrGeorge

ST THEODOSIOS THE GREAT, THE CENOBIARCH
ST MICHAEL OF KLOPS MONASTERY, FOOL FOR CHRIST
SS ETHENIA AND FIDELMIA, NUNS

Troparion of the Feast Tone 1
When Thou wast baptized in the Jordan, O Lord,/ the worship of the Trinity made its appearance./ For the voice of the Father bore witness to Thee/ when He called Thee His beloved Son./ And the Spirit in the form of a dove/ confirmed the truth of the word./ O Christ our God, Who hast appeared and hast enlightened the world,/ glory to Thee!

Troparion of St Theodosios the Great Tone 5
Thou didst shine forth in God-given virtues,/ O righteous Theodosios,/ and wast an illustrious model of the monastic life./ Thou wast seen as a God-like light and leader,/ the emulator of Angels/ and servant of the Trinity./ Pray to God unceasingly to have mercy on our souls.

Troparion of St Michael, the Fool for Christ Tone 8
Thou wast foolish on earth for the sake of Christ and didst hate the beauty of this world wholeheartedly./ By thirsting and fasting and by lying on the earth thou didst wither the flesh and the play of the passions./ Thou didst never shun heat, frost, rain nor snow, nor other hardships of climate and weather./ Like gold in the crucible thou didst purify thy soul, O holy and Godbearing Father Michael./ Thou dost now stand in heaven before the throne of the Trinity./ Boldly pray to Christ our God that our souls may be saved.

Troparion of Ss Ethenia and Fidelmia Tone 5
O daughters of King Laoghaire and first-fruits of Patrick's mission,/ most pious Ethenia and Fidelmia,/ you were blessed to receive the monastic veil from Ireland's Enlightener./ Weeping and lamenting we call upon your charity./ Pray to Christ our God/ that He will raise up a new Patrick in our day,/ that we may be led into the Way of Salvation.

Kontakion of the Feast Tone 4
Thou hast appeared today to the world,/ and Thy light, O Lord, has been signed upon us/ who with full knowledge sing to Thee./ Thou hast come, Thou hast appeared,/ O Unapproachable Light.

Kontakion of St Theodosios the Great Tone 8
Thou wast planted in the courts of the Lord, and didst blossom with holy virtues;/ thou didst increase thy children in the desert/ and irrigate it with the rain of thy tears, O Shepherd of God's divine sheep folds./ Wherefore we cry: O Father Theodosios, rejoice.


Kontakion of St Michael, the Fool for Christ Tone 8
In the power of the Holy Spirit thou wast like the ancient Prophets:/ for thou didst utter unknown secrets that would come to pass in the year of God's judgments./ Thou hast wrought miracles in Christ and astonished the people./ Thou hast granted victory to those who cry:/ Glory to God Who glorifies His Saints.

Kontakion of Ss Ethenia and Fidelmia Tone 4
Having been tonsured, O most pure and righteous virgins Ethenia and Fidelmia,/ you were found worthy to tarry in this vale of tears/ and to receive the Body and Blood of Christ, just once,/ before going to your eternal reward./ We chant your praises and implore Christ our God/ that, in the day of Judgment,/ He will not find us wanting.

Of some service to Warren. My Diocese and Archdiocese publish the full text of Vespers & Orthros for the weekend services and Feasts. While not every day, the structure of these weekend services could be learned by carefully studying these services. On the Archdiocese website: www.antiochian.org. Scroll down the home page to: Online Orthodox Church Liturgical Guide. On the Diocese website (Los Angeles) www.antiochianladiocese.org, scroll down the home page looking to the ovals on the left, click on: Liturgics. In Liturgics you will see a red rectangular box titled Service Texts. Click on this and the full texts are posted ...There are also various Liturgy-Choir Workshops both on the East and West Coasts. St. Vladimir's and Antiochian village I know have them. On the West Coast our diocese gives one, in fact it is posted currently on the antiochianladiocese home page it is called the West Coast Sacred Music Institute and is scheduled for 19-22 Jan 2006....... .in Christ ...FrGeorge


#4 Herman Blaydoe

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Posted 12 January 2006 - 01:57 PM

The OCA website and the GOARCH sites both provide tropars and kondaks for the saints of the day in calendar and searchable formats. I use them regularly to publish the tropars and kondaks for Sunday for our parish.


#5 Guest_Fr George Morelli

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Posted 12 January 2006 - 02:29 PM

Herman, Glory to Jesus Christ ....yes they do for the most part, but some are missing and I find this frustrating when doing research and putting together materials etc ....this is why I did not give the source but what they do have (about 90% is excellent) ....... in Christ ..FrGeorge


#6 Dcn Alexander Haig

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Posted 13 January 2006 - 01:00 AM

Sorry, this is a slightly different question, but I thought here would be a good place to put it. What is the difference between a "troparion" and an "apolotikion" (sp?). As far as I can work out a troparion is any hymn whereas the apolotikion is the specific hymn of the feast sung towards the end of vespers. Am I correct?

With love in Christ

Alex


#7 Warren Bensinger

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Posted 13 January 2006 - 02:36 AM

Fathers bless.

Thank you for your help. I have looked at what you have said and the places you've sent me and remember from the past. It has helped and I will continue to try to soak it up. I've been at this for about two years of my almost 6 years now in Orthodoxy. I have more time now to spend learning and praying and as some of the Fathers have said, learning to pray, even the Jesus prayer, is helped by spending more time in the rites and prayers of the church. I'm trying to learn this.
Thanks again.

warren.
t.s.

#8 Fr Raphael Vereshack

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Posted 13 January 2006 - 05:29 PM

What is the difference between a "troparion" and an "apolotikion" (sp?). As far as I can work out a troparion is any hymn whereas the apolotikion is the specific hymn of the feast sung towards the end of vespers. Am I correct?


Yes the apolytikion (this is the spelling most often seen) is the troparion sung at the end of Vespers.

In Christ- Fr Raphael

#9 Guest_Sandra June Hofstead

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Posted 13 January 2006 - 06:47 PM

The sisters at Holy Myrrhbearers Monastery update liturgical texts daily on their website, and I am sure that if you contact them they would help you locate the other texts you are loooking for as well. http://holymyrrhbearers.com
In Christ, Alexandra


#10 Olga

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Posted 16 January 2006 - 07:57 AM

The word Troparion is a general term for hymn, as it refers not only to the apolytikion (dismissal) hymn mentioned above, but to other hyms, such as the stanzas following the eirmoi/irmosi(Greek and Slavonic usage respectively) which begin an ode of a canon. Most often, in most people's minds, though, the word troparion refers to the apolytikion. A Kathisma as described by Fr Raphael can also be called a Sedalen (Germanic word, also used in Slavonic), or a Sessional hymn. Both words refer to sitting.

As to your frustration, Warren, on finding liturgical materials online, I can understand this well. Over the years I have accumulated a large collection of digital liturgical materials in English, as well as Slavonic and Greek. I may be able to help. You're most welcome to email me privately.

A tip if you're attempting to compile texts of particular services: there can often be variations in the texts used in vigils between jurisdictions or "nationalities". One of the best examples of this is the vigil for the feast of the Protection of the Mother of God. Greek churches use an entirely different text (it was written in the early 1950s, if I'm not mistaken) to the older text still used by the Slavic churches. The reason for this seems to be in part because of the incident which drew Greece into the Second World War, namely, the invasion of the country by the forces of Mussolini's Italy on October 28, 1940. This date became Greece's secondary national day (after March 25), and the feast of the Protection has also been moved from October 1 to this date. Other liturgical variations can also occur, though usually (thankfully!) not quite to the same extent.


#11 Fr Raphael Vereshack

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Posted 16 January 2006 - 02:57 PM

A tip if you're attempting to compile texts of particular services: there can often be variations in the texts used in vigils between jurisdictions or "nationalities".


Yes this is very true. At some point one usually chooses which basic liturgical tradition one will follow- the Slavic or Byzantine (often this is already decided by what jurisdiction one is in)- and keeps to this for the sake of consistency & sanity.

There are very basic differences between the two traditions such as the Byzantine often having 6 stichera at Lord I have Cried at Vespers for great saints while the Slavic tradition has 8 stichera for almost all feasts.

The Slavs also have a very standardised way of shortening many of the sung parts of the Vigil such as Blessed is the Man, the Polyeley & the Praises. Even in monasteries one often sees the shortened form whereas the Byzantines often do the full Psalms.

Even the basic structure of the Vigil can also be different with the Slavs loving to do 'vigils' (doing Vespers & Matins together on the evening before) even for daily services without a great doxology. In the Byzantine tradition for the Sunday resurrection service Matins is often done on Sunday morning immediately before the Liturgy whereas for the Slavs Matins is always done on Saturday night immediately following on Vespers (so immediately following that parishioners often don't realise that Vigil is composed of three services- Vespers, Matins, 1st Hour- and is not just one long service.

There are many other interesting differences also.

In Christ- Fr Raphael

PS: Before I forget thanks Matthew S for the recent guidelines for the monachos discussion group which include using our real name. This is some sort of pet peeve of mine I guess but I have always thought that Orthodox communication even on the wild world of the internet obligates the using of our real name so as to promote honesty as a basic starting point of conversation. Some other forums do not ask for this and to me at least this gives a note of falseness to the conversation.

#12 Olga

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Posted 17 January 2006 - 03:25 AM

I understand there can also be differences in the order of the "standard" text of what is sung or read in vigils between Greek and Slavic usage, such as the position of the Prayer of Intercession and the Gospel. Another series of significant services where there are notable differences between Greek and Slavic usage are the services for the Resurrection, especially in the Matins of Easter. Briefly, the Greek Easter services use more short cuts.


#13 Angie

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Posted 19 March 2017 - 12:32 PM

Would anyone know were I can obtain a book that has the Troparion and Kotakion in Greek one side and English on the other side?

 

Maybe the name of the book?

 

Thanks






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