Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

Evangelism


  • Please log in to reply
47 replies to this topic

#41 Andrew

Andrew

    Very Frequent Poster

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 363 posts

Posted 16 January 2008 - 10:29 PM

The Balamand Agreement is heretical... it's basis is in "Baptismal Theology," which is basically a modified version of the Branch Church heresy. The Orthodox Church is the Church. Salvation is within her, and to deny the opportunity of entrance into the Body of Christ to not upset the Pope is silly. What would St. Mark of Ephesus say about all of this?

The creation of saints is the greatest mission of evangelism. A holy man sanctifies the area around him and is a spiritual magnet, drawing others towards him, towards Christ who lives within him. Technology, slick marketing, and jurisdictional unity are not the keys to evangelism in the modern world. Fidelity to the deifiying mysteries of Christ in the ascetical-sacramental life of the Church is the key to true evangelism.

#42 Mary

Mary

    Very Frequent Poster

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 800 posts

Posted 17 January 2008 - 12:04 AM

If the other person is Christian why would that be an uneven yoke? It is not that Catholics and Protestants are unbelievers. And Saint Paul in his advise distinguishes clearly between believers and unbelievers.


Orthodoxy is as different from Catholicism and Protestantism, as the difference between believers and unbelievers. On the surface, the similarities seem small, but the deeper you get, the further apart you get. That's why, we're not even one with our own family and friends anymore... just two years ago, we were one with them. We've especially been cut off from those with whom we had the deepest spiritual connections, in fact, that severing, was quite painful.

In Christ,
Mary.

#43 Darren

Darren

    Frequent Poster

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 203 posts

Posted 08 February 2008 - 09:57 PM

The Balamand Agreement is heretical... it's basis is in "Baptismal Theology," which is basically a modified version of the Branch Church heresy. The Orthodox Church is the Church. Salvation is within her, and to deny the opportunity of entrance into the Body of Christ to not upset the Pope is silly. What would St. Mark of Ephesus say about all of this?

The creation of saints is the greatest mission of evangelism. A holy man sanctifies the area around him and is a spiritual magnet, drawing others towards him, towards Christ who lives within him. Technology, slick marketing, and jurisdictional unity are not the keys to evangelism in the modern world. Fidelity to the deifiying mysteries of Christ in the ascetical-sacramental life of the Church is the key to true evangelism.


This works both ways, i'm all for people being able to evangelize where ever and however they like.

This would also open the door to the Catholic church in Russia.

#44 Owen Jones

Owen Jones

    Very Frequent Poster

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,341 posts
  • Orthodox Christian Member

Posted 09 February 2008 - 02:31 PM

Since I started this thread, I suppose I ought to contribute something. But most of what I have to say on the subject, based on my personal experience and history, would come off sounding like sour grapes. And there is an intrinsic arrogance when trying to state how things ought to be, or how people ought to be doing things differently, whilst sitting at the keyboard of a computer, or by pointing to one's personal example of doing things differently. With that said, I attend a parish that, when compared to my old home in the Episcopal Church, is nothing short of a taste of heaven. However, when I compare it to the possibilities, it is quite nerve wracking. I can't help thinking that we are committing a grievous sin by keeping our light hidden in a basket. My way of looking at it is that if we don't give away what we have, we lose it. And we are simply clinging to what we have got and doing little or nothing to give it away. There are so many possibilities for evangelism that exist, that do not fit into the gross forms of American promotionalism, even little things that we could be doing, even in our own internal prayer lives, that it is difficult not to feel aroused by feelings of frustration and discontent. I can think of no greater area than that of education. And of course the Greek people still consider themselves to be a kind of repository of classical wisdom, both Christian and philosophical, including the mathematical arts, architecture and aesthetics. As one humanities teacher of mine many years ago put it, the Greeks had a word for it. So why not respond to the hunger of many wrong people today for something other than ideological nostrums in education? How about some stronger presence on our college campuses? What about a national magazine for college students that draws from our knowledge of the spiritual life, and what it means to live in an anti-spiritual environment. With all of the experimentation going on with exotic spiritualities, why not offer an experimental approach to young people? But it seems like we are operating on the principle that what is at rest stays at rest.

#45 Rick H.

Rick H.

    Very Frequent Poster

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,231 posts
  • Orthodox Christian Member

Posted 09 February 2008 - 02:48 PM

It seems that while operating in fear of a spiritual ADHD setting in (akin to what is perceived as an Evangelical-Protestant hyperactivity), there is an opting for a mode that manifests itself as a spiritual autism which provides a status quo that is in deed severely introverted and in this sense most sinful. It seems the thinking here is to hide that light lest someone would attempt to blow it out. I wonder what the Apostle Paul would have to say about this way of being in the Church today? I think I know what he would say.

#46 Nina

Nina

    Very Frequent Poster

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,149 posts

Posted 10 February 2008 - 03:07 AM

And of course the Greek people still consider themselves to be a kind of repository of classical wisdom, both Christian and philosophical, including the mathematical arts, architecture and aesthetics. As one humanities teacher of mine many years ago put it, the Greeks had a word for it.


LOL A word for it? That is why Washington DC (not to mention other cities) looks more Greek than Athens itself?

#47 Paul Cowan

Paul Cowan

    Very Frequent Poster

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,064 posts
  • Orthodox Christian Member

Posted 03 January 2009 - 10:14 PM

This is a speech from Metropolitan Jonah from Fr. Joseph Homeycut's blog; Orthodoxie. In case the exact segment does not show, look in the archives under January 3, 2009.

#48 Andrew Pantelli

Andrew Pantelli

    Regular Poster

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 20 posts
  • Orthodox Christian Member

Posted 06 April 2009 - 10:45 PM

Orthodoxy is as different from Catholicism and Protestantism, as the difference between believers and unbelievers. On the surface, the similarities seem small, but the deeper you get, the further apart you get. That's why, we're not even one with our own family and friends anymore... just two years ago, we were one with them. We've especially been cut off from those with whom we had the deepest spiritual connections, in fact, that severing, was quite painful.

In Christ,
Mary.


Romans 10:15 "How beautiful are thre feet of those who preach the gospel of peace, Who bring tidings of good things!"

There are differences between us, but what is it that bonds us? Our love of our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ! Should we not be showing and telling people about what He has done for us in our lives.


In Christ Alone Andy




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users