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#41 Father David Moser

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Posted 28 January 2007 - 08:57 PM

I'm not sure how to answer this question. If you are a catechumen in a particular parish, and you want to know about whether you could receive communion in some other particular parish, well then the best thing is to ask your own priest about that parish.

At present the Russian Church Outside Russia and the Russian Church inside Russia are technically "separated" and do not concelebrate or share a common litugical or sacramental prayer. However, that separation was due to the domination of the Church inside russia by the atheistic soviet authority. But that authority is no longer in power and the domination is ended and by God's grace these two parts of the Russian Church will soon re-establish their proper relationship. As for the relationship between the Greek Church and the Russian Church - in this country it has been strained at times, but never broken off entirely. One of the factors that has strained our relationships with the other national churches has been our own internal disorder. Once that is resolved, it is expected that any irregularities that still exist between the Russian Church and the other national Churches here in the diaspora will fade away and our relationship will find an equilibrium.

Fr David Moser

#42 Anthony Peggs

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Posted 29 January 2007 - 01:40 AM

Bless, Father

i really just want to make sure i'm in a canonical church.

Kissing your right hand,

Anthony

#43 Anthony Peggs

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Posted 29 January 2007 - 01:47 AM

Bless, Father

Hi Father David, how come some have said that ROCOR was out of communion? from what i've read it seems to be in Communion.

Kissing your right hand,

anthony

#44 Father David Moser

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Posted 30 January 2007 - 05:17 PM

how come some have said that ROCOR was out of communion?


Well, I guess you'd have to go to the people that said that and ask them how they came to that mistaken conclusion.

Fr David Moser

#45 Kosta

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Posted 17 February 2007 - 09:58 AM

Bless, Father

i really just want to make sure i'm in a canonical church.

Kissing your right hand,

Anthony


As long as your church is headed by a right believing bishop with apostolic succession following proper praxis, and you gather together & partake of that Gift; the Holy Eucharist, which unites all Orthodox christians regardless of juridiction and synod and calendar, your in good shape.
This is the only canonicity you need to worry about.

#46 Hieromonk Ambrose

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Posted 07 February 2009 - 09:37 AM

, I think we do need to face the fact that ROCOR was never intended as a permanently separate ecclesiastical body, and the necessity for its existence as such no longer exists. Now that the fullness of communion has been restored, canonically, what should happen is that, in time, and with pastoral sensitivity, we should be absorbed into the autocephalous churches of the places where we find ourselves.


Dear Michael,

I disagree about the fading need for ROCA's continuing existence and see it is just as necessary as in the past. The fact is that the thousands of new Russian immigrants in the West are flowing into the Russian Church Abroad. This is where they feel their deepest spiritual connections.

Talke my country - New Zealand. We have 4 Russian Church Abroad parishes. When I became parish priest 30 years ago each parish had a membership of just a handful of people.

Since perestroika and emigration out of Russia, we have moved up into the thousands.

My home parish, Wellington (maybe 30 members in 1990) - now up to 2,000 members

Christchurch (50 members in 1990) - now 3,000

Auckland (100 members in 1990) now 5,000.

(These figures are all rounded off for convenience.)

So you can see that we are expanding rapidly and we hope to expand more because, as well as the churched people who have swelled our numbers already, there is around the same numbers again who are unchurched immigrants and who can, we hope, be brought into the Church over time.


Then same has happened in Australia, with even greater numbers involved.

So we have truly become the Russian PATRIARCHAL Church Abroad and our existence, to serve the spiritual neds of these Russian people, is just as necessary as that of the Greeks or Lebanese who are serving their own people around trhe world.

Thanks to the arrival of these immigrants our clergy numbers have gone up. For 30 years it was only me running around the country! Now we have 2 priests from Russia (and another one due to arrive) and 1 from Australia.

It's all good. :)

#47 Rdr Andreas

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Posted 07 February 2009 - 01:01 PM

It may be that the reason so many Russians now attend ROCOR churches is that since the re-union of ROCOR and MP, Russians from Russia, such as my wife, will now go to a ROCOR church whereas they would not have done before; plus, a ROCOR church may be the most convenient or only Russian church available.

#48 Hieromonk Ambrose

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Posted 07 February 2009 - 01:14 PM

It may be that the reason so many Russians now attend ROCOR churches is that since the re-union of ROCOR and MP, Russians from Russia, such as my wife, will now go to a ROCOR church


In this diocese (Australia and New Zealand) the Church division did not impact on us. The new wave of immigration began about 1994, which is 13 years before the union. There was no hesitation about welcoming them and nor did they stand back. They were quite happy to attend our churches. In fact they very quickly began to dominate in the choirs and to be elected to our Parish Councils. It was something wonderful to see - brother met brother with a kiss of peace, immigrants from the 1950s and immigrants from the 1990s.

#49 Fr Raphael Vereshack

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Posted 07 February 2009 - 01:56 PM

Even though our diocese had a very radical reputation on the MP issue I think that all of our parishes grew during the last 10-15 years due to the arrival of new Russians. Our parish for example has just about quadrupled in size in the last 10 years. However reconciliation did add somewhat to our numbers- there were some new Russians who only began attending once reconciliation occurred.

An added change brought by reconciliation however has been the attendance/association with our parish of more Orthodox of other jurisdictions than previously. This ranges from attendance at our services to participation in the sacraments.

To my way of thinking this has helped situate us as an indigenous part of the larger Orthodox Church. It has not taken anything essential from our character but rather improved it.

In Christ- Fr Raphael

#50 RichardWorthington

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Posted 08 February 2009 - 09:13 AM

In this diocese (Australia and New Zealand) the Church division did not impact on us. The new wave of immigration began about 1994, which is 13 years before the union. There was no hesitation about welcoming them and nor did they stand back. They were quite happy to attend our churches. In fact they very quickly began to dominate in the choirs and to be elected to our Parish Councils. It was something wonderful to see - brother met brother with a kiss of peace, immigrants from the 1950s and immigrants from the 1990s.


"In fact they very quickly began to dominate in the choirs and to be elected to our Parish Councils": Thank you for posting this. Coming from a jurisdiction that is still reverberating from a recent split due - it seems to me - precisely from fears of being 'taken over' it is nice to hear of a harmonious coming together.

Pray for us - all of us in both jurisdictions involved!

Richard

#51 Ilya Zhitomirskiy

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Posted 15 January 2013 - 11:01 PM

There are also significant numbers of non-Russians in ROCOR, especially in the Southern United States (google the documentary "Orthodox in Dixie" released by ROCOR Eastern American Diocese). Other traditionally-minded Orthodox are also integrating into ROCOR, especially former Catholics and Fundamentalist Protestants.




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